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790 Adventure R Suspension Mods

Discussion in 'Parallel World (790/890)' started by windblown101, Jul 5, 2019.

  1. Velociraptor

    Velociraptor TrackBum Super Supporter

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    2,187
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    Correct. My stuff came with some stickers that said Touratech Suspension by TracTive.
  2. kubcat

    kubcat Long timer Supporter

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    Upstate NY
    well then, why pay for the middleman? Why not go direct?
  3. 1coolbanana

    1coolbanana Long timer

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    And pay half?
    Dont think you can, dont think they sell certain products direct, licence agreement and all that etc
    Velociraptor likes this.
  4. SirWreckaLot

    SirWreckaLot Been here awhile

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    Dec 17, 2019
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    162
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    Heartland
    The frame of the R is different as well. The rake/trail for the S is 25.9 degrees/4.2 in. and for the R it’s 26.3 degrees/4.3 in... it’s orange too, which is arguably the most important thing about the R.

    Edit: I was wrong
  5. SoilSampleDave

    SoilSampleDave Dr. Zaius was right!

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    Nope. The frame is identical, other than color. The differences you reference are caused by the longer travel suspension.
    BHoward, SirWreckaLot and Subaruvich like this.
  6. SirWreckaLot

    SirWreckaLot Been here awhile

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    Ahh, I thought rake was measured from a set point on the frame and that the steering head dictated it... didn’t realize it was from a 90 degree angle with the ground and that front/rear suspension heights would indeed affect it. I was wrong. Frames are the same.
    SoilSampleDave likes this.
  7. offworlder

    offworlder Been here awhile

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    Sep 6, 2010
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    Vancouver, Canada
    A MASSIVE hats off to @Torque:pynd - who's masterful craftsmanship has totally transformed the bike!
    No more non adjustable stock WP XPLOR :topes feeling like cement. I threw everything I could at her today; rocks, baby heads, logs, loose uphills/downhills, whoops, and she ate it up effortlessly - never bottomed, feels plush while firm, and I now have a huge range of adjustment.
    Amazing work @Torque :clap:clap:clap Outstanding!
  8. Nelso

    Nelso All the gear-no idea

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    May 20, 2014
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    In Australia at release in June 2019 there was AUD$1,500 difference between the R and S. Currently the R price is $23,395 ride away and they are now doing 2019 S models for $18,990 ride away and 2020 S models for $21,495 ride away
  9. new2adv

    new2adv Converting gas into wheelies since 1974

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    Ouch! Makes our prices look pretty good!
  10. jaumev

    jaumev Long timer

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    Barcelona
    Just picked this beauties 20200708_163402.jpg
  11. bikemoto

    bikemoto Tyre critic

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    There's more price difference here, too, especially with run-out pricing on the 2019 S vs a 2020 R. I did consider starting with an S and then adding Xplor Pro suspension plus Rally mode, but that suspension here is very pricey, and probably not worth the upgrade over the R for me. [Edit: You DON'T have to change the S's triple clamps to go from the Apex 43s to the Xplor or Xplor Pro 48s. In fact the triples are completely identical.]

    In the end I went with an R and the PP lowering kit. Not only will it be better than the S, it will still have more travel and ground clearance. I'm riding the bike with the OEM suspension until the first service, so that fitting the kit becomes a first service on the forks and shock (oil change). The suspension is very harsh for me and it looks like I need to go down a spring rate in the shock. I have not yet checked or changed sag (clickers are at or near fully open), that's the next step but I will do that before the lowering kit is fitted so I can compare the two. The kit includes springs but supposedly at the OEM rate.
  12. bikemoto

    bikemoto Tyre critic

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    When I get my OEM lowering kit installed in the next few weeks, I will measure the dimensions of the OEM and lowering springs. And get them to check for any signs of this issue.

    Easy to do and will give one more data point.
  13. SoilSampleDave

    SoilSampleDave Dr. Zaius was right!

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    Please stop spreading the falsehood that you need different triple clamps to switch between S and R forks. The upper part is the same diameter.
  14. bikemoto

    bikemoto Tyre critic

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    Thanks for correcting that. I should know better than to take the dealers' off-the-cuff remarks as gospel. Indeed the whole triple clamp assembly is identical. The only difference in the parts book is the fork legs themselves, and the R's fork guards are listed on that page rather than the bodywork page. Front and rear wheel assemblies are also completely identical.

    Interesting that the 390 Adventure also has WP Apex 43 forks but a different sub-model number to the 790. The upper outer tubes are different diameters and therefore the triple clamps are (very) different, and so are the axle holders (smaller axle, single brake disc).
  15. tbarstow

    tbarstow Two-wheelin' Fool Super Supporter

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    I turned the preload all of the way up on the fork and it is starting to work properly! I can hit washboard and not feel like my wrist is going to break!

    Pic is just south of Flagstaff.
    windblown101 likes this.
  16. windblown101

    windblown101 Long timer Supporter

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    When my forks were stock I ran 3mm of additional preload and I also found it seemed to make the forks feel a bit more compliant. I weigh about 180 in street clothes.

    After round four of valving changes on the forks with the local tuner I'm extremely pleased with the current setup and I'm running zero preload on the external adjuster again. He put up with a lot from me as we worked through the changes, lol. I've been on several rides with the current setup and have not come back from one thinking "Still needs work".

    The latest rebuilt shock from the WP suspension center is holding up well so far. It's not as perfectly tuned for my riding as the forks but its improved over the original unit. Or perhaps I've just finally found settings that are working for me. Regardless, it doesnt hold me back, just feels like it could be better. That's plenty good enough for now. I will likely have the local tuner have a go at the shock when winter comes.
    EvilSteve and TrailTrauma like this.
  17. EvilSteve

    EvilSteve Not so evil, not so Steve.

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    Getting my suspension done by @Torque makes riding in technical terrain waaaay less stressful, I have to think about the bike a lot less and can think about my line and technique a lot more. Whether you're going to a local shop or upgrading to WP Pro suspension, getting it set up for you makes riding these silly machines just that much better. Even better yet is if the stock suspension works for you then you save money and have a great bike to ride. :-)
    offworlder and AdvRonski like this.
  18. MistressOfMayhem

    MistressOfMayhem Guttermouth Ragdoll

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    Kern County
    If this question has already been asked here, forgive me. I've scoured through many many pages and tried to find a viable search option to no avail. I just bought a new '20 790 R three weekends ago. My ONLY gripe is, of course, seat height. I have a 31 inch inseam and I've already got the low seat in the works but I've been reading about the aftermarket suspension mods with the progressive springs to help bring the height down. My forks are at OEM settings and my rear preload has been backed out 2 turns past OEM. I already know that I'm going to be in for some aftermarket adjustments since I weigh 140-145, but I'm wondering if anyone has any suggestions or thoughts on this as a method to gain an inch or so without butchering the travel of the suspension. I was looking at the options offered through Touratech and Hyperpro but maybe there are other options?
  19. Torque

    Torque Been here awhile

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    San Diego
    Yes I do, as a matter of fact.
    How much do you want to lower the bike? Keeping in mind you want to lower the bike as little possible yet be comfortable.
    How important is performance, meaning are you an aggressive rider?
    If you are aggressive do you have a racing background? Those guys are generally really aggressive and slam the bike into things, hard.
    Percentage of time you are standing while offroad?
  20. MistressOfMayhem

    MistressOfMayhem Guttermouth Ragdoll

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2018
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    Kern County
    Well I'm definitely not a pro by any means. Most of my offroading experience is recent and I would consider myself pretty timid in sand and mud. I stand quite a bit because I feel more comfortable letting the bike work beneath me and I work to be as non-existent as possible yet still giving some input. I don't ride fast in the dirt, and if I'm honest I probably wouldn't even put the stock suspension through its paces but I also wonder how much of my limited confidence in the dirt is because I am currently riding a stock KLX 250 that I also haven't touched the suspension on. However, coming from a street/trackday background (where I was much more spirited perhaps a fast Intermediate rider), I do know the importance and difference it makes in having your suspension tuned to your size, style, pace, etc. I definitely favor the front brakes and my habit is to come in to corners a little hard and then throttle out. I am currently riding the 790 in this fashion on the street/canyons. Adventure bikes are a whole new ballgame for me and what I LOVE about this bike is it feels light and balanced when it's moving but only two weeks in, I still haven't quite gotten used to her or her suspension feedback.

    I guess my main question is how far off is the stock suspension from being compatible with my size and needs? Am I going to benefit significantly from going with a more custom setup? Or is it simply a matter of making a few adjustments to what exists? At the moment if I am sitting centered on the seat my feet dangle about 2-3 inches above ground. My KLX has a seat height roughly the same and I make it work because it is narrow and light and squats a LOT more when I sit on it. So my comfort level with this bike would be about 2 inches? And that's factoring in the SC low comfort seat that is en route.