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790 Adventure R Suspension Mods

Discussion in 'Parallel World (790/890)' started by windblown101, Jul 5, 2019.

  1. Venturer

    Venturer AKA klakeman Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2004
    Oddometer:
    965
    Location:
    Dawsonville
    A female friend of mine had the Touratech lowering kit (essentially springs) installed, and she is much happier. It is about 1.5-2 inches lower in my estimation. The kickstand becomes too long once you lower the bike, and a swap to the non-R side stand might be necessary. The stock suspension, with or without the lowering kit, is actually quite good for many/most riders. I have had tons of KTM dirt bikes (own a KTM 350 XCF now) and owned a long-term KTM 950 and 1190R. The stock 790R suspension is firm but is by far the best stock adventure bike suspension I have sampled. Can it be improved (especially for heavier and more aggressive riders)? Yes. But I like just fine mine as-is and the suspension can be fine tuned to some extent with pre-load adjustment and the damping clickers.
    MistressOfMayhem likes this.
  2. Torque

    Torque Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2006
    Oddometer:
    514
    Location:
    San Diego
    2 inches 50.8mm lower bike. This would shorten your fork by 56mm giving you 184mm of travel up front. The rear would have 189mm of travel. 7.45"
    I think you will be fine at your level and that much travel. We can get you to 200mm of travel up front with some additional labor still keeping the bike level at 2" overall drop without raising the fork in triples.
    So taking about 20% of your travel simply means you are 20% closer to bottoming with the stock suspension when shortened.
    If it was me, I would shorten the bike the correct way with internal spacers, and do the mod to retain as much fork travel as possible, get it sprung properly, and ride.
    If you intend to go at a conservative pace do not worry about the re-valve unless you want to address the harsh aspect of the suspension. Springs alone will not address the initial hit harshness.
    If you intend to go at a faster pace putting you in situations where you may hit ruts, washouts etc. at speed then you should do a quality re-valve. With that you will have a shorter bike that will out perform a stock height 790R in the rough and be a much safer and a better riding motorcycle. Cost can be from likely $1000 for a low end build and up to $1600 for a true re-design going all in with springs etc. Keeping in mind many times you get what you pay for. A mush re-valve while shortening can be more dangerous than stock. Dialing in EvelSteve took a couple shots and we learned a lot from him as he likes plush and bottoming resistance. But he seems pleased. AdvRonski is a hammer and has a much more aggressive set up. Think more like EvelKnievel. Lol. Enjoy the ride!
    bikemoto, EvilSteve, BHoward and 3 others like this.
  3. MistressOfMayhem

    MistressOfMayhem Guttermouth Ragdoll

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2018
    Oddometer:
    49
    Location:
    Kern County
    Some great feedback here worthy of some deliberation. Thank you guys for taking the time to respond. I think I would be somewhere in between EvelSteve and AdvRonski. I do see that the Touratech arrangement is a fairly cost effective option, which is why I was wondering how much it changes the handling of the bike overall or if it was worthwhile. My preference would be to do it Glad to ear some good things. I definitely like a comfy ride but I don't want to feel like I'm riding a marshmallow. Once the seat gets here I think I'll have a better idea of where I stand... (sit?). If I can make it doable on the current suspension, then that will give me some time to refine my preferences so that when I shell out the money for a complete re-design, I won't be changing my mind 8 months later when I've gotten faster or more skilled.
  4. WI-790R

    WI-790R Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2020
    Oddometer:
    75
    Location:
    Cochrane, Wisconsin
    I installed the tourtech progressive -30mm springs on my R about 650 miles ago. I’d say it lowered it the stated 30mm, or very close to that. The springs, with the bike on the side stand, seem to keep the bike very near it’s original height, such that the lean angle on the stand isn’t much different than stock. With the bike held upright, it does settle some, and with some body weight, it settles the 30mm. I fully expected to have to shorten the side stand, but as of now, have not felt a need to.

    I’d offer to take a pic on its side stand but the bike is at the dealer (since last Wed. evening). I took it there for the first service, to have the stuck brake light fixed, and to enable cruise control. I want to give them the benefit of doubt, but still don’t know f they tried replacing the simple front brake light switch. I had convinced myself (ohmmeter) that the switch was bad. They are pursuing various firmware solutions. But what does a customer know.......right?

    I had written a bit about the installation and riding impressions here, post #59:
    https://advrider.com/f/threads/ktm-790-adventure-r-height.1414651/page-3#post-40357917

    Bill
    MistressOfMayhem likes this.
  5. 171Steve

    171Steve Adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2020
    Oddometer:
    14
    Location:
    South Africa
    @Torque and @AdvRonski so there is now cost effective way to send my forks and shocks from SA to Amerika.
    We do have a local option available from N10Z. They have dynamic conevalves.
    In your honest opinion if its not feasible to have your suspension send over and no local tuners available that is will to work with you on the suspension to get a proper result.
    Will you give the N10Z a try its reasonably priced in our country.
  6. Torque

    Torque Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2006
    Oddometer:
    514
    Location:
    San Diego
    On their website there is only a bottoming device sited. No idea of what they do. If it is a shim shuffle you are looking for maybe Race Tech Gold Valve is an option for you. Small package because it is diy.
    Not sure if they are doing them yet , but it is just an email away to find out.
  7. Maniac28

    Maniac28 Independent Moto Journalist

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2004
    Oddometer:
    454
    Location:
    California
    So I've gotten my front forks to work well by dialing out the clickers past comfort. They were too harsh to begin with. I can't seem to get my rear shock to feel compliant. I am 190lbs on a stock 2020 790R. Sag is set correctly. I am using the "standard" settings for the rear shock, going to comfort didn't seem to help. Any clues? Am I just going to have to suck up for a revalve?
  8. Torque

    Torque Been here awhile

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    Apr 4, 2006
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    514
    Location:
    San Diego
    I hate to say it and yet I should love to say it. You have to go inside both forks and shock for compliance. It takes valving & springs to get the compliance and longevity from the shock.
    For true ready to race type of performance meaning safety at high speeds and compliance, replace omitted parts, build new damper design springs modify cartridges, stems, etc. .
    You want somewhere in the middle of the road, springs, revalve, with damping in both forks and a standard shim stack design.
  9. offworlder

    offworlder Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2010
    Oddometer:
    617
    Location:
    Vancouver, Canada
    Yer in Cali, so send yer stuff to @Torque and be amazed.
    EvilSteve likes this.
  10. 171Steve

    171Steve Adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2020
    Oddometer:
    14
    Location:
    South Africa
    to me it seems the same and im not sure if it is worth it.

    That said. To save on shipping wat exactly do you need from my forks.
    Perhaps i can disassemble them and only send the parts needed for you to do your magic on the internals, it would save me massively on shipping cost if I only send the internals that you need then it might just be possible for me to have them done by you.
  11. Torque

    Torque Been here awhile

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    Apr 4, 2006
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    Location:
    San Diego
    Cartridges without disassembly as I need the Base valves and rods the spring guides / hydrostops, fork caps. All of these need mods. So basically everything except the tubes and lugs.
    You can send me the shock shaft with all components in place and the high speed adjuster as it also has a shim stack that needs mods.
    1coolbanana likes this.
  12. AdvRonski

    AdvRonski They call me......Ronski

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    1,529
    Location:
    Finally made it to Fruita!
    That's what I did with George. I just sent the cartridges and the base valves, which does save quite a bit on shipping. I shipped them in a pair of PVC tubes to keep them safe.
  13. 171Steve

    171Steve Adventurer

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    Feb 26, 2020
    Oddometer:
    14
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    South Africa
    Ok that is good news.
    Might just work then.
    All in all would two pvc tubes of 1.2m be big enough for everything.

    @Torque will you be happy with that arrangement?
    Im sure our local suspension guy will be able to disassemble and then assemble afterwards.

    Will you also be will to assist with info if he is unsure about something.

    He did do the full course at FCR and is also the local agent for K-tech so im sure he is clued up enough to be able to do it.
  14. Torque

    Torque Been here awhile

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    All good and I will have the cartridges reassembled so he can just bolt them in.
  15. EvilSteve

    EvilSteve Not so evil, not so Steve.

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2008
    Oddometer:
    725
    Location:
    SoCal
    I ride a lot of freeway on my 790 to get to the trails I ride. I also jump my 790 whenever I can because it's hilarious. I'm also pretty new to offroad so, I'm doing technical things but doing them slowly. I'm also pretty light (165 lbs / 75 kg) so was already at the limit of KTM's stock setup (if we want to pretend that it was any good to start with... lol).

    As @Torque mentioned, I'm looking for plush in general and bottoming performance for the reasons above but, with the spring rates I have now and the valving improvements, I can dial in to have more support as I start getting faster and need that support. If you watch any of @AdvRonski's videos you'll see that he's a beast (compliment) - I'm not that.

    Like all suspension setup, mines a compromise for my needs what I can say is that @Torque is awesome and amazing to deal with. I have no hesitation in recommending him and his work. I'm much more confident riding my 790 on the same trails as my fiancé's 250 except single track.
    offworlder, TrailTrauma and Brilloman like this.
  16. deeve

    deeve Adventure Lite

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,652
    Location:
    Hillsboro, OR
    Got a sag question for the group. I measured the unloaded sag with the rear wheel off the ground at 610mm. Bike only sag was right at 30mm. With me on the bike at 275 lbs the sag with zero preload was 95mm. With four turns to the "Standard" preload according to the manual was 85mm. The bike has less than 2000 miles on it. I bounced the bike multiple times between settings. All other settings on the shock were the "standard" settings. The spring is the stock spring showing 95-210 F/X on it.
  17. bikemoto

    bikemoto Tyre critic

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2004
    Oddometer:
    4,510
    Location:
    Nelson, New Zealand
    What's the question? Numbers sound legit; you're heavier than me and getting bigger sag numbers as a result.

    Measure the sag twice: first compressing then rising to settle, second lifting then falling to settle, and then average the two. This makes allowance for stiction. I get 5-6 mm difference at the rear.

    I didn't measure static sag at 0 preload, but 4 turns gives 19 mm, and 2 turns gives 25 mm.
  18. deeve

    deeve Adventure Lite

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    I guess my question is, shouldnt the sag be much more than due to my size? I think 90-100 is just about right isnt it or am I thinking wrong?
  19. bikemoto

    bikemoto Tyre critic

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2004
    Oddometer:
    4,510
    Location:
    Nelson, New Zealand
    Conventional suspension theory is 10% of travel (24 mm) static sag, 33% 80 mm for rider sag. KTM & WP have different ideas, especially with PDS setups. I haven't found any advice yet from KTM/WP about the 790R suspension, but for the WP4860's on my EXC and 640A their advice is different to both the above and each other!!

    Anyway, 90-100 mm is likely too much, you'd need a stiffer spring to get back to 80 mm. You can try more preload, but an over-preloaded soft spring will be harsh initially and introduces its own problems. Someone posted a link previously to Slaven's IIRC showing recommended spring rates for various rider weights.
  20. deeve

    deeve Adventure Lite

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,652
    Location:
    Hillsboro, OR
    THank you.