790 Adventure S (Standard) Suspension Mods

Discussion in 'Parallel World (790/890)' started by No-Fret, Dec 5, 2019.

  1. c-m

    c-m Long timer

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    Yeah they got back to me when I pointed that out and said that it's the 890 they haven't measured not the 790 even the subject of my email was 790/890. Not that it makes a difference since they are the same, but I guess as a manufacturer they have to be precise.

    Ohlins say that the offerings with their branding must be setups made by the Andreani Group in Italy, so their HQ knows nothing about it.

    Tractive like hyper Pro say they haven't yet measured the 890.

    None of this give me any comfort the aftermarket makers have a clue. WP all the way for me.
  2. outdoorsman

    outdoorsman Lets Ride! Supporter

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    Thank you @No-Fret for starting this thread and those contributing to this thread! What a valuable piece of info! I just read this thread the past two days.

    I must be the smallest guy on a 790S around here. 5'4" and 130 lbs with 27" inseam.

    I just got a good deal on a leftover 2020 790S in January. After 3500 miles on it both on street and off road. I must replace stock suspension.

    A couple of questions:

    1. The Andreani cartridges only go down to 160 lbs. Do they make one for 130 lbs?

    2. The Hyperpro shock doesn't come with a preload adjuster and therefore it's an extra cost?


    Thanks!
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  3. new2adv

    new2adv Converting gas into wheelies since 1974

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    I got custom fork springs from Cannon Racecraft. The dimensions were 470mm long with an OD of 38mm. They can make them any spring rate you want. $160 plus shipping for the pair. You don't get the adjustable damping of the Adreani but they work well enough for my needs.

    I got a great deal on a Hyperpro shock with X-Trac preload adjuster from EPM Performance. They have a discount for ADVRider members.
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  4. No-Fret

    No-Fret Tanker

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    Hi Outdoorsman,

    Looks like 160 lbs is the lowest they go. To be honest what I think and have read is the Andreani springs are a little softer then advertised. I have the Andreani and Hyperpro heavy springs and can still get the sag set pretty low if I wanted to so I can flat foot it (32 inseam).

    My son weighs 140 lbs, has a 30 in inseam and he can flat foot my bike as well. On top of that the suspension settles in over time. The Hyperpro shock is awesome (I paid extra for the pre-load adjuster) and if you select 130 lbs no gear, beginner, the springs should be soft enough to were you can touch your feet.

    I ordered through Rottweiler for both Andreani and Hyperpro suspension parts. I will never ever buy suspension without a remote pre-load adjuster.

    Hope this helps
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  5. outdoorsman

    outdoorsman Lets Ride! Supporter

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    @No-Fret I just want the adjustability of the forks and shock. I find that with the stock suspension, I'm fighting the bike to get it to turn in because it's too stiff/hard. But I don't want it to be too soft that it'll bottom out and just wallowing in corners. The stock suspension works great on the street in fast sweepers. But when it comes to technical tight corners and offroad, it's slow to turn in and too stiff.

    Is your setup too soft for off road?
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  6. slacker83

    slacker83 Been here awhile Supporter

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    I just ordered the hyperpro shock from EMS last week and should see it within a few weeks. I would say and nice pavement I am pretty happy with the stock suspension but any bump and the intial shock I'm not crazy about it. Then when off roading I feel like it can be all over the place when it gets rocky. With the stock setup I need to have my luggage on the bike to get the sag where I want it on the lowest preload setting. I still haven't decided what I'm doing for the front yet, either going to send them to torque or order the andreani cartridge. The torque option I won't have adjustability but it seems like people have been happy and made the fork more compliant.
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  7. No-Fret

    No-Fret Tanker

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    No, not at all. I can set it up for street or road with just a few click on the forks and shock. I can set it up for a plush or stiffer ride. Offroad it rocks compared to stock.
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  8. No-Fret

    No-Fret Tanker

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    To be honest the Andreani kit is worth $500. Install is straight forward. I think it would be cheaper with better results then having a shop try to set up something up front.
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  9. kubcat

    kubcat Riding is Eudaemonic Supporter

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    Remember that the turn-in is a function of rake/trail, which is adjustable. By lowering the forks in the triple, resulting in raising the front end, you make the rake more slack and increase the trail. This will slow the turn-in and make it more stable in a straight line. Alternately, by raising the forks and lowering the front end, the rack is steeper and the trail is shorter. This results in less stability in a straight line so turns are easier to initiate, but too much makes it feel a bit unstable. Just play around with it to get it where you like it.
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  10. No-Fret

    No-Fret Tanker

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    Good point. After installing the Andreani fork kit I dropped the forks at the triple clamps about 3 mm and it handles better on trails.
  11. C.Hensley

    C.Hensley Been here awhile

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    I just ordered fork springs from Torque. In my past bikes/experience having the correct springs, preload and sag makes a huge difference in handling and suspension compliance.
    I usually don't find that I need revalve work unless I'm looking for all out performance or my weight and riding style is way out side the parameters of what the manufacturer had the suspension set up for. Ymmv

    Outdoorsman, I too find the initial turn in hard and slow like it is fighting me. I believe with the correct front fork sag (and rear sag) that will improve. Right now my fork doesn't have enough sag with me on it..so the front end is kind of like a chopper right now. If I decrease rear sag and move the forks up in the triple tree it improves (turn in is quicker) but makes the shock more harsh. I believe each line on the top of the fork tube is 5mm. I have mine at the 4th line right now. My hope is once I have the fork sag correct the bike will turn in better.
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  12. kubcat

    kubcat Riding is Eudaemonic Supporter

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    How does moving the forks in the triple make them harsher?
  13. new2adv

    new2adv Converting gas into wheelies since 1974

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    The stock springs have way too much preload, so even for a rider of the correct weight they still provide a very harsh ride. I don't know why KTM did that! Maybe trying to encourage customers to move up to the "R"? But that certainly doesn't help those of us whose legs are too short for the "R" version...
  14. windblown101

    windblown101 Long timer Supporter

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    Nah, KTM did the same on the R forks which have 16mm of initial minimum preload. Why? I don't know. Doesn't seem like it was a money deal. Different spring rates or preload doesn't change cost as far as I can see.
  15. new2adv

    new2adv Converting gas into wheelies since 1974

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    Makes no sense...
  16. windblown101

    windblown101 Long timer Supporter

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    I would tend to agree, though I doubt WP does too many things completely at random without any thought on the matter. It would be cool to hear what a WP fork engineer had to say about it. The only thing I could come up with is given a target rider sag number, a lighter spring with more preload exerts less force at the bottom of the stroke than a spring that would net the same rider sag with zero preload. Maybe that's what they wanted to achieve (for whatever reason).

    This is a bit of an extreme example (and yes, it's not based on an S fork but the same rules apply). Pretty sure my math is right on this but math is hard...

    Take a set of R forks with 6.7N springs with 16mm of spring preload with enough weight on them to compress the forks 72mm. To get the same 72mm of fork compression with zero preload would take an 8.1N spring.

    At the bottom of the stroke (240mm+16mm preload) the two 6.7N springs combined would be exerting 771 lbs of force.
    At the bottom of the stroke (240mm+ 0mm preload) the two 8.1N springs combined would be exerting 874 lbs of force.

    My current pet theory is they wanted to use springs that ramped up at a slower rate so they used a lighter spring with more preload to achieve that. Is it better? Heck if I know. Ask an engineer. ;)
  17. C.Hensley

    C.Hensley Been here awhile

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    It doesn't. I should have split that into two different sentences. What I meant was increasing rear shock preload (decreasing rear sag) makes the bike turn in quicker. However it makes the rear shock more harsh.
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  18. Norduro

    Norduro Thumping

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    Dropped the bike off at the suspension shop today to get both a Tractive cartridge kit and shock installed. I hope this puts an end to the harsh ride. I agree it would be interesting to hear WP's reasoning behind the preload and valving. But honestly, the S OEM ride quality is so bad that whatever their reasoning was, the end product simply falls short of what I expect from an Adventure bike's suspension.
  19. C.Hensley

    C.Hensley Been here awhile

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    I haven't had the bike long as I bought it used off the original owner less then 2 months ago.

    I had a chance to ride it off road on a fast very pothole strewn dirt road this past weekend. Speeds were 35-55mph. I will say that the suspension starts to work better the faster you go. Still a bit harsh for sure however the bike is very composed hitting those potholes at speed. The bike is an absolute hoot on dirt roads! Looking forward to trying out the fork springs as I think I only need to take the edge off the initial harshness. Not sure what I'm going to do about the shock yet though.
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  20. Norduro

    Norduro Thumping

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    I totally agree, the S suspension works better the faster you go. But that is simply not how I ride...
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