790 Adventure - When you are out camping

Discussion in 'Parallel World (790/890)' started by tshansen, Feb 8, 2020.

  1. tshansen

    tshansen Been here awhile

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    At the moment i try to go as light as possible when i'm out on the trails or doing overnight adventures.
    I use both Tent and Hammock, but will try to use hammock much more this season.

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    I currently run the setup from Enduristan. I have the Blizzard Large side bags, and the Tornado 2 Medium on the rear. This is enough for me to be on the road for 2 - 3 weeks. But I'm also looking into the Mosko Moto setup at this time

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    Tent is a good option for alot of situations, but can be alot of hassle when wet. I have used my hammock for over a year now on some of my adventures, but find myself not being creative enough when it comes to find places to rig my hammock.

    Off course, when you got tree's you can easy put it up. I will try to use some equipment from my climbing gear, to more easy use when in rocky conditions and i got the new pad inside to isolate better if i have to lay the hammock on the ground and secure it in my bike or with rocks.

    What are your best tricks or tips to secure your Tent/hammock when out on the trails?

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    I will try to get alot more experience with only hammock camping in 2020, to see if i can go on trips without tent or if it still has it place on some of mye trips.
    What are your favourite gear and why?

    #1
  2. kubcat

    kubcat Been here awhile Supporter

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    I haven't camped off the 790 yet. Last time was off a 350 on the MABDR. I run the Mosko Moto R40 with a cheap 30L duffle I got from Walmart.com for $25. I think the same setup will work on the 790 too.
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    I use the big Agnes copper spur 2 bikepack version. It is a great tent and with the shorter poles fits nicely in the duffle, which is what I use for all my "soft" camping gear; tent, bag, pillow, liner, chair, as well as toiletries all go in the duffle on top, because they are light.

    You can see the big Agnes is pretty small. It's the grey tent on the right. But it's very roomy for just me and has vestibules on both sides for muddy bags off the bike, but easy access from inside the tent. I love it.
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    #2
  3. tshansen

    tshansen Been here awhile

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    I'm not sure how weather affect you over there, but here in Northern Europe, we get cold air at night and condensation are a real pain early and late season. Packing down and up a wet tent every day is not my kind of fun. Makes me believe more in hammock, but it has it's limitation in some part. Nice pictures. Nice to see how other rig their bikes for camping. Cheers mate
    #3
  4. OhDuh

    OhDuh Adventurer

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    Inflatable Tent (heimplanet) sleeping bag (deuter) duffle bag (cheap 80liter version) insulation air mattress (thermarest) and a backpack is more than enough for a weekend

    Attached Files:

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  5. truckergemi

    truckergemi Adventurer

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    038072FB-8C26-4D15-AC9C-07AE69DCB54E.jpeg F25C790E-41B4-4663-99B4-541176D03534.jpeg Took mine out last weekend. I desperately need a down sleeping bag that can compress well, but the reckless 80 system is terrific!

    Attached Files:

    #5
  6. kubcat

    kubcat Been here awhile Supporter

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    Yeah, the fly and the ground cloth are always wet from morning dew whenever I break camp, but since the tent stays dry and I am careful to shake off the excess water before repacking, it's not a big deal. If needed, I can separate the dry tent and sleeping bag from the wet fly and ground cloth while I ride.
    That's just what camping is and always has been for me here in the NE US.

    If I used a hammock, I wouldn't need a ground cloth, but I would still need a fly, and it would still be wet every morning, so I don't see much advantage with a hammock, although I've never camped with one. I sleep quite cold, so I need a good down bag and insulated sleeping pad. I feel that a hammock would be less warm on the bottom, and that it wouldn't be as comfortable sleeping.
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  7. tshansen

    tshansen Been here awhile

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    I don't know why, but tunnel tent are much more popular here than the one you use. Cons with that is that it's really hard to shake of the condens. I have a insulated pad in my hammock, but know you need a underquilt in a traditional hammock to stay warm. The positive is you get of the ground and sleep "flat" every night. Everytime i seam to find a good spot to camp, it's always downhill :p

    Damn, that reckless looks almost too big. You can fit an elephant in those sidebags :-D
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  8. ibgary

    ibgary Long timer

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    I switched from tent to hammock a few yrs ago. Next month I'll take the wife's cot along with the hammock and tarp. That's just in case I don't find trees when camping at Big Bend N.P. No tent. If the weather is bad, it's nice to sit in my chair under the tarp and watch the rain, build a small fire, cook, all the things I can't do in a tent. 1364723727.jpg 1980094154.jpg
    I use the Mosko Moto Scout 25.
    The hammock is a Warbonnet Blackbird, with the Wookie underquilt. I've used that down below freezing. Very warm and very compressible.
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  9. EvilSteve

    EvilSteve Not so evil, not so Steve.

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    From a couple of thousand-mile trip on my old `14 MTS GT. I haven't camped on my 790 yet but have the Mosko Moto Reckless 80 and this tent. I'd love to run a hammock (or a single person bivouac for super lightweight) but, living in the southwest US, there aren't a heap of trees to speak of so you can't count on finding somewhere for a hammock. I've camped in that 2 person tent with my girlfriend before as well but, I could totes save weight for offroad trips.
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  10. Golum

    Golum n00b

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  11. tshansen

    tshansen Been here awhile

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    This looks really interesting... i try to find rocks, cracks or places to put up a rope i can tie my hammock to if no tree's. But this looks even better. Thank you
    #11
  12. blackSP

    blackSP 62 6c 61 63 6b 53 50

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    Looks nice but the stand plus hammock and roof will be 2 or 3 times the weight of my 1250 gram double roof 2 person tent. To consider when you need to travel light.
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  13. windblown101

    windblown101 Long timer Supporter

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    I haven't done the hammock thing. Lazy I reckon, LOL.

    In the past I've done the lean-to tarp attached to bike. 2 man tent, and last year a one man tent (both tents of the free standing variety). I got along ok with the one man tent after I got used to it but miss the space of the two man tent.

    I like the idea of a hammock but I often find myself setting up camp very late in the day (read getting dark) and trees aren't always around. Looking for a suitable spot for the hammock would take more time in a lot of cases than finding a spot to pitch a small tent I suspect. When traveling from one spot to the next every day speed of set up and breakdown is a factor. The hammock looks fast to set up and take down, the tents I use are quick too though. Still... if the funds and the desire align some day a hammock will get a tryout.
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  14. ibgary

    ibgary Long timer

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    The hammock and tarp definitely has a learning curb. If interested look up Hammock Forum or better yet search for Shug on YouTube.
    For me it comes down to having a nice roomy place to hangout (pun intended) during a storm. 2nd is the comfort. My back went out about 10 yrs ago and I thought my camping days were done. The hammock has been a game changer.
    If your tent setup works, keep it. Going to the hammock will also mean a virtual reinvestment in New gear. The stakes are about the only interchangeable item. 620949029.jpg
    The Yobo video on YouTube shows it being set up in terrible (windy conditions. Looks like a good system. Taking 1/2 of it would reduce the weight and would work with only one tree. Looks about the size of my wife's ultra light cot. More research in order.
    #14
  15. tshansen

    tshansen Been here awhile

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    What and where do you store your equipment in bad weather? I'm looking at taking with me two tarps so i have better shelter when cooking and take on/off clothes after a day on my bike.
    #15
  16. ibgary

    ibgary Long timer

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    The gear goes under the tarp. The tarp i normally use measures 11' by 9', Hammock Gear, Journey. When it's a family trip I bring the Kelty Noahs tarp for my daughter's hammock, it is 12x12 and has room for all 3 of us under it for cooking, eating playing cards, gear. The big Givi box on my bike doubles as a table for cooking, eating, card game, bear box. The Kelty is a great tarp. Though, inexpensive and versatile. When I'm alone I take a much more lightweight and compact tarp made of silnylon. Check Hammock Gear or Warbonnet outdoors for lightweight tarps.
    The Yo no looks good, but at 175$ and 2.5 lbs per stand I'll pass. 953571324.jpg
    I use an internal ridge line on the tarp. A line that goes under the tarp from tree to tree. It gives better stability in windy conditions and also provides a clothes line to hang things from. I hang items out from under the tarp until I go to sleep. That way they are protected if it rains at 2 AM.
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  17. ibgary

    ibgary Long timer

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    If the tarp is wet it goes in a mesh bag on top of the box with my rain gear. 229537769.jpg
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  18. EvilSteve

    EvilSteve Not so evil, not so Steve.

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    For the hammock campers, how do you all deal with insulation from the cold? I dig the idea of super lightweight (hoping I didn't need stands but oh well) my other concern about hammocks was just getting super cold.
    #18
  19. TrailTrauma

    TrailTrauma Nemophilist

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    Google under quilts. It's not about placing a sleeping pad on TOP of a hammock alone and expecting sufficient insulation. Much better to hang a special insulated quilt UNDER the hammock. Then add in the sleeping pad, bag etc. The under quilt by virtue of hanging below remains 'uncompressed' and therefore retains it's R value. There is a holistic approach which together forms a safe, warm approach to hammock camping.

    This company makes the hammock I have, and this page shows the under quilt nicely:

    https://www.eaglesnestoutfittersinc.com/shop/blaze-underquilt-downtek/

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    #19
  20. ibgary

    ibgary Long timer

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    I use the Warbonnet Blackbird hammock and they make an underquilt, the Wookie. The underquilt is the most important item for staying warm, IMO. I've slept, and I mean slept well down in the to around 20F. I tried using a sleeping bag when I first tried the hammock, but the bottom compresses and my back was cold in about 50* weather.
    Top quilt, Underquilt, tarp.
    #20
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