94’ CR250R Cracked Swingarm

Discussion in '2 smokers' started by Quiksilver2525, Dec 1, 2020.

  1. Quiksilver2525

    Quiksilver2525 n00b

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2015
    Oddometer:
    6
    Location:
    Clemson, SC & Lynchburg, VA
    Hey all,

    Just picked up a 1994 CR250R for $2,200. Everything looked in good shape upon initial inspection. However, after getting it home and in my garage, I noticed this hairline crack on the swingarm weld. Is this something that can safely be welded (assuming it is ground flat and TIG welded by someone with aluminum welding experience)? I plan on turning it into a woods/enduro bike, so I wouldn’t be doing many big jumps on it. If this is not suitable, what options do I have as far as replacing it? I can’t seem to find any replacements on Ebay or the sorts. I’ve seen some people say that CR125’s of the same year have interchangeable swing arms, but have not had anyone confirm this. Or could I source a swingarm from another year and fabricate it to fitting my bike? Thanks for the help & input.

    P

    Attached Files:

    #1
    spokester likes this.
  2. spokester

    spokester Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2013
    Oddometer:
    2,003
    Location:
    SE USA
    There's a guy in Greenville SC called JVE Engineering who is absolutely tops in aluminum welding.
    #2
  3. Euromad

    Euromad Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2010
    Oddometer:
    605
    Location:
    Lower Slobbovia
    Any good aluminum welder can fix that. Mid 80's Huskies were prone to crack at the pivot and many were and are re-welded with no problem
    #3
    concours likes this.
  4. Quiksilver2525

    Quiksilver2525 n00b

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2015
    Oddometer:
    6
    Location:
    Clemson, SC & Lynchburg, VA
    This is good to hear, I was having a mini panic attack after realizing part availability is dwindling, and that frame & suspension parts aren’t very interchangeable between these mid-90’s CR250R’s. Fortunately the crack isn’t very deep, mostly just through the old weld bead. I just wanted to make sure welding was considered a safe option for this.
    #4
  5. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2007
    Oddometer:
    13,887
    Location:
    Omicron Persei 8
    Grind the existing cracked weld out with a carbide burr down to just below the surface to expose the full length of the crack. Clean it really well with alcohol. Do not use a sandpaper with aluminum oxide grit or Scotch Brite as they contaminate the aluminum base metal. Aluminum oxide melts at 3,762*f and most aluminum melts at 1,221*f. Any aluminum weldor worth their salt can easily weld that for you. If you do the prep, it should take less than about an half hour, but expect to pay the shop rate of somewhere around $80 to $110 an hour.
    #5
  6. concours

    concours WFO for 50 years

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2008
    Oddometer:
    8,581
    Location:
    NH USA
    No.

    Let the weldor prep that joint. 43 years in the metal trade. ASME Section III, and section VIII, as well as FAA A&P certified. A layman cannot properly follow the part line while excavating.
    #6
  7. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2007
    Oddometer:
    13,887
    Location:
    Omicron Persei 8
    Or you could do that! But the average "Master Manipulator of Molten Metal" a Joe Schmoe around here would take it to would have any of those certs.
    #7