A few questions about moving to Canada

Discussion in 'Canada' started by duke72, Mar 3, 2006.

  1. billy_037

    billy_037 Been here awhile

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    Be prepared for the insurance. Gonna be expensive. You must insist that they accept your driving records of Ireland, otherwise it's gonna be really expensive.

    Good luck.
    #21
  2. ~dirtgirl~

    ~dirtgirl~ Dirty girl!

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    yep, no Norwich Union "rider" policies over here! I loved having to just have one policy in the UK but could have many bikes on it, here each one has to be insured. sucks when you have a bunch of bikes in the garage!

    S
    #22
  3. Steve G.

    Steve G. Long timer

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    There's nothing to stop you from purchasing a new 12GS from the closest BMW dealer, probably in Missoula, Montana. With the Canadian dollar gaining strength against the US dollar recently, buying a bike new in the US makes alot of financial sense, as used one even more financial sense. And, a all BMW's are on the Transport Canada list of admisable vehicles.
    Vanveen is of course correct, that it's Canada Customs you would have to deal with on vehicle importation. He should have mentioned that if a bike is new, and not on the list of admissable vehicles, it won't be allowed in period. Remember, there are many models of bikes from many manufacturers available in Europe that are not brought into North America. These may not be on the list.
    Regarding insurance, this is something I can brag about. British Columbia has the cheapest bike insurance in Canada, as it is government insurance.
    Ciao, Steve G.
    #23
  4. Stand Up

    Stand Up Ride non-painted roads

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    That 12GS I mentioned below, just got sold to someone in Edmonton. I think by the time you add ABS, crash bars, dealer prep and GST, it's going to be around $21,000. My insurance for my 12GS is $160 a year - no collision or theft. With, it would be $1100 with $1000 deductable.
    #24
  5. Drif10

    Drif10 Accredited Jackass

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    Just to clarify: That's US models admissable to Canada.
    #25
  6. advridergirl

    advridergirl Been here awhile

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    When I moved back to Canada and imported my bike and car from the US some of what I had to provide were....

    1. Insurance companies wanted 7 years of insurance history history in the form of "Experience Letters" (auto and bike) from my past insurers noting dates of coverage and any claims. Without this they were going to insure me as new driver, never before insured.

    2. 3 years driver's abstract. I can't remember off hand who I had to provide this to, insurance or motor vehicles or both.

    3. US Customs required that I apply with a Vehicle/Equipment Export Worksheet and set an appointment to export the vehicle (make sure it's not stolen) so they could inspect it on export and they give you paperwork. Canada Customs required I do the same on import. I don't know what other countries might require to export a vehicle. Additional paperwork required on both sides was the usual bill of sale, title, etc. proving ownership.

    4. The Registrar of Imported Vehicles (http://www.riv.ca/) required that the manufacturers of my vehicles provide me a 'Recall Letter' stating there are no outstanding recalls. The RIV then registers the vehicles in their database and sends you a form that has to be completed and returned to them upon inspection. This is different than an Out of Province inspection which also needs to be performed. Basically, Canada inspects it, says 'ok' or 'not' and make modifications, then gives you a sticker to affix, then the Province inspects, says 'ok' or 'not' make modifications...then you can register it. If I recall correctly this all has to be completed within 45 days.

    I also recently learned that new vehicles can take a year to two before they appear on the list, so being new doesn't necesarily mean ii's ok even if past years were allowed. If they're too new and not on the list you have to import through a Registered Importer, lock your vehicles up and pay for testing to be performed and potential modifications.

    Needless to say, there was lots of paperwork that had to be gathered ahead of time and lined up. I remember when I first moved to the States I don't recall all this rigamoral...maybe I'm remembering wrong or things have changed. Or, it's just my luck :rofl

    My 2 cents :(: I can't say it was painless but got through it all okay with planning and forethought. Don't know how quick I'd be to do it again. I'd have to really, really, like my vehicle. I'm sure it'd be easier the 2nd time around too, having some idea of what to expect.

    Jacqui
    #26
  7. HighwayChile

    HighwayChile greetings from Wa state

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    the worm has turned. due to the sinking US $, there are some buys to be had in the US for those of you up north.

    Steve G advice follows what I have heard. say, if he can bring in a 15-16 yr old bike w/o the rubber glove, pissing off the man goin' through the border....why not bring some thing us in these parts cant get? ride it a season and sell it for wwaayyy more then you paid. like a africa twin? myself I have the hots for 125 aprilia tureg, now thats a odd duck, even has split tanks ala 950 adv,

    re ales, head south to the NW USA for kick butt stouts, Guiness is for school girls around here:1drink

    If you get tired of the winter, ( its get freakin cold in edmonton) do what locals do, go to mexico or arizona, rent or stuff a bike there.
    best of luck, :1drink
    #27
  8. Steve G.

    Steve G. Long timer

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    All excellent information.
    #28
  9. Steve G.

    Steve G. Long timer

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    Well, Guinness certainly is due it noted respect as a standard stout. But you are correct that the US North West is a hotbed for true ales. I recently went on a bike tour, with the mission of identifing the best IPA in the western states. Washington, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, and Northern California. It seems Oregon has a standard lofier than most. Wild Duck in Eugene won our test [4 full mash home brewers] with a king of an IPA, actually Continental King IPA.
    That said, Boundary Bay makes a very nice sampling, although since brewmaster Skip has started a place of his own in Port Townsend, the standard of beers there have certainly apexed. Archers in Fairhaven has long been a favourite of mine. I know they are only servers of other makers brews, but the casual atmosphere there is so comfortable, it makes savouring an ale there very nice. Frank & Stein in Ferndale is another quirky little place I like to slide into. Too bad they are closed on Sunday, as they would get me visiting most every weekend, as I am usually ripping up the roads east of there.
    Highway, if you are north of the border and get a chance, go to Mission Springs in Mission. Their brewmaster has raised his level of craft considerably. His IPA is certainly the best you can find in the lower mainland of Vancouver. Maybe, and I say maybe, you will find something comparable in Squamish, but only if they stop serving their beer so cold! The way they pour the beer, using English beer engines, gives them big bonus points. The same for Archers when they have a cask conditioned ale on tap.
    I'll stop now. You get me onto beers, I could go on forever. It is my other hobby.
    With regard to bikes, yes, it seems the US is on sale, for us Canadians. Friends of mine have recently purchased a Honda Transalp [never brought into Canada, and only available 2 yrs in USA I think], a Ducati ST4, a Hesketh [over 15 yrs old !], and a Z50 Honda. Ducatis are absolute bargains for us in the USA, as are Hinckley Triumphs. Used Ducati prices up here have always been artificially high, not sure why. While my buddy very recently brought in an MV Brutale under a now closed loophole, [there are perhaps 10 MV's in Canada now] this make of bike, and the likes of Ghezzi-Brian, Benelli, and small production makers like that, will not be available to us until they are 15 yrs old.
    Ciao, Steve G.
    #29