1. eNewsletter Sign Up

A Journey Across North America

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by rudy4pl, Nov 12, 2019.

  1. rudy4pl

    rudy4pl Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    100
    Haha If I knew what I was getting myself into, I'd probably have had to reconsider my options. Ignorance is a bliss :rofl
  2. rudy4pl

    rudy4pl Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    100
    The dr can definitely take a beating!
    Oldschoolrocker likes this.
  3. rudy4pl

    rudy4pl Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    100
    If I learn it the hard way, it always seems to stick. They say it's wiser to be learning from the mistakes of others, but that's no fun :D. Enjoy your Alaskan trip, that's awesome that you're taking your dog along! Bring back some photos
  4. rudy4pl

    rudy4pl Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    100
    August 16, 2019 Fri (Day 24)

    Another cold night. Going through my morning routine I realized that my toothpaste blew out on one of the drops. My cooking set got pretty banged up. I've torn off a couple more straps on my soft bags, good thing my father gave me a ratchet strap that I've been using. It's looped around the rear holding both soft side bags in place. No way they would be holding on without it at this stage.

    I've headed out at sunrise and was able to summit within 15 minutes.
    2019 Trip (458).JPG
    I was the first one today to complete this pass, mark your calendars, August 16th 2019, Radek is the first to summit Imogene Pass :D.

    The west side of Imogene Pass is as rough as the east side. A short while into the descent I come across another rider, it is Al on his wr250.

    There's strength in numbers, we descent together and make it to town. Al invites me to a breakfast in town and I take him up on it. We chat for a bit and then decide to ride to the other side of the black bear pass and check it out on foot.
    2019 Trip (464).JPG

    It's no myth, the pass is definitely snowed in.
    2019 Trip (461).JPG

    A mighty distracting view right when you get onto "the steps" of the pass.
    2019 Trip (474).JPG

    "The steps" looking up. The picture doesn't do it justice, but it is extremely steep and step-py. I would have left the bike up there and called it a trip if the pass was open yesterday :rofl
    2019 Trip (476).JPG
    2019 Trip (478).JPG
    2019 Trip (481).JPG
    2019 Trip (488).JPG

    There's a "hiking" trail midway along those mountains to the right across a very narrow ledge. You need a special harness to walk it that attaches to the wires that were set up.
    2019 Trip (491).JPG

    Al and his trusty steed.
    2019 Trip (496).JPG

    On the way back down, we come across a group of hikers. One of them brings up their recent trip to Alaska and mentions how the bears had to be scared away from campsites with warning shots. Gulp :confused I wonder how my wild solo camping is going to fare up there...
    Shortly after we make back down into town again, we split off. I decide to check out the town a little bit. It is refreshing seeing wood on building envelopes. In NYC there are many restrictions that would not allow it under most circumstances.

    I head out and continue along the tat. I have not really had lunch as I was snacking throughout the day, so I decided to pull over at 5pm for a meal.


    It was already late so I started looking for a place to camp. I found a couple of spots, but ultimately decided to backtrack a few miles to the location where I just had a meal and camp out there.
    juno, KLRalph, CavReconSGT and 9 others like this.
  5. Oldschoolrocker

    Oldschoolrocker a.k.a. EZE Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2017
    Oddometer:
    2,553
    Location:
    Tacoma Wa
    Man you where living the dream! Awesome!
    rudy4pl likes this.
  6. rudy4pl

    rudy4pl Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    100
    It was definitely a great trip that put some things into perspective for me
  7. rudy4pl

    rudy4pl Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    100
    August 17, 2019 Sat (Day 25)

    The morning was cold, I had to whip out my heated winter gloves for the first time on this trip :vardy.

    Well maintained gravel roads today so far for the most part. I'm slowly dropping in elevation and it is getting warmer, warm enough that I decide to go for a swim in a lake I was passing by. I find it compelling how quickly the temperature can change with a drop in elevation.
    [​IMG]

    I hit a town to get some supplies and choose my route. One way was standard tat route and then a turn off for Geyser Pass. Geyser Pass sounds promising, I'll do that.

    On my way to the pass I was taken on a lot of paved roads. Once I hit dirt, I pulled over shortly for a lunch break. It was windy and I was being harassed by bees.

    I proceed and the first 5 or so minutes are sandy and rocky uphill climbs. Looks fun, but soon it is all uneventful gravel roads through the pass.

    I'm slowly making my way towards MOAB and the new landscapes are once again refreshing. I start seeing red, funky shaped rock formations.
    2019 Trip (522).JPG
    2019 Trip (526).JPG
    2019 Trip (530).JPG

    It's getting late and I decide to take a detour to see if I could find a place to camp. It has some rough rocky sections and at one point they become a little bit too much for me to climb over, so I decide to turn around and do some googling. Not many free campgrounds around MOAB, but I find something about 30 miles out. I stop in town, get some oil for cooking and head out. Beautiful landscapes all around on my way there.

    Video highlights of the day:


    I arrive and it's quite empty, I'd have figured there would be a little bit more humanity here on a Saturday, especially that it's free. Just 2 or 3 couples that parked and headed out for a night hike as it's too hot to hike during the day. The trail is a nice combination of hiking and climbing these rounded red rocks.
    2019 Trip (531).JPG
    2019 Trip (535).JPG

    I have late dinner and fall asleep admiring the mighty milky way, it is so clear tonight.

    Note to self, 100% virgin oil does not make good cooking oil :fpalm
    juno, CavReconSGT, MYUMPH and 4 others like this.
  8. ipeters

    ipeters Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2014
    Oddometer:
    14
    Outstanding! Just goes to show that a positive attitude can make up for any possible shortcomings in skill.
    rudy4pl likes this.
  9. Themastermike

    Themastermike Think you caught me in a coma Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2011
    Oddometer:
    3,290
    Location:
    So Ill
    ^^^Any?

    Maybe not any but quite a few.
    rudy4pl likes this.
  10. CavReconSGT

    CavReconSGT Just the right amount of evil.

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,372
    Location:
    CT/NH
    I have to say whatever he might lack in skill (which doesn't look to bad to me) he more than makes up for in balls.

    KR
    rudy4pl and Oldschoolrocker like this.
  11. rudy4pl

    rudy4pl Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    100
    August 18, 2019 Sun (Day 26)

    In the morning I went for a quick hike to check the area out before it got too hot. Canyons, buttes, mesas, plateaus, I cannot overstate how much I love this part of the country. I don't think I'm the only one :clap.

    I rode out to join up with the tat again. Once I finally hit dirt, I realize that my right aux light has broken off, ehh I don't really ride during the night anyway. I've unscrewed it and placed it in my bag just in case. The bike also doesn't seem to lean as much as it used to when on the side stand, it almost wants to fall over to the right on a flat surface :D. I have the rear shock fully screwed in, I wonder what's up.



    After a while I come across a red section. I have to ride back and forth twice to find it, it's just another single track that is almost impossible to see off of the main dirt road.

    I proceed and it greets me with a wavy sandy track. I continue and ride down a couple of rocky sections that left me thinking.

    "Will I be able to make it back up this stuff if I have to turn around?"

    2019 Trip (540).JPG

    It is the middle of the day, so it is scorching hot and I only keep dropping in elevation. I already dropped the bike twice, pick-ups really take a lot out of a person around here. I continue descending some really tight and rocky single track, I have to keep looking back to make sure that my side bags are going to clear the protruding rocks, or else I'll just uncontrollably fall off to the opposite side as there is not enough space to get good footing. Soon I come across a very steep, rocky downhill descent that ends with a sandy landing.

    If I manage to make it down this, I'll be almost at bottom where it's mostly flatlands for the remaining majority of the single track. I think about it, but very quickly come to the conclusion that it's just way too dangerous. The chance of me injuring myself really badly while attempting this is far greater than actually succeeding.

    I have a really hard time turning the bike around, there's not much room here. After a little battle, I manage and I start making it back up the tight single track. Once I almost reach the top, my front bumps up uncontrollably and shoots off to the left. I trap my left foot between a rock and my soft bag. This would have been a broken ankle with metal panniers. I get the bike up, reach relatively flat surface and stop to rest. I'm a little bit exhausted and so I manage to drop the bike... fuck. I pick her up and somehow drop her on the other side :fpalm. Most of my melted icy water has already spilled out of the cooler and I only have limited water in my jug left, I really have to get out of here.

    Backtracking and coming up some of these sections that I went down was a little bit tricky. Some parts I just had to find a way around. Going off of the single track the soil was very puffy and my rear kept digging in.

    I get past the last tough section and reach the sandy single track I started on. Something feels off, I look behind and my right saddle bag is all fucked up. The remaining vital strap had torn off and my ratchet loop strap was not enough to hold it on its own. I fix it temporarily, but it's sitting very low and it won't stay in this position for very long.

    I reach the main dirt road and boy am I happy :jack. I head to the next town to fuel up and see if I can fix my bags. I decide to make some improvised rope from duct tape. I tie it to the side rack and loop it around the bottom of the side bag so that it sits higher and is kept in place. It seems to work.

    I buy some ice cream to cool off and head out again. I hit some very fun two tracks that come in and out of canyons. Stopping for a break in the shade of the canyon with the wind rushing through felt great in this climate.
    2019 Trip (544).JPG

    2019 Trip (547).JPG

    I'm riding around countless mesas and the sun is getting closer to the horizon. I spot a rough road going up one that has a cell tower. Aside from the high frequency frying my brain, I think I'll be fine. It is a little bit windy, so I'm having trouble setting up the tent.
    2019 Trip (548).JPG

    I spot something in the distance.


    I spend the rest of the twilight gazing at the sky and its ever-changing shades.

    The stars are out in full force again.
    juno, CavReconSGT, bomose and 9 others like this.
  12. wrangler747

    wrangler747 KLR for life

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2008
    Oddometer:
    541
    Location:
    South Korea
    You are doing an amazing job explaining your adventure, you sure take some risks on those "red routes"...Keep your adventurous spirit
    rudy4pl likes this.
  13. rudy4pl

    rudy4pl Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    100
    Those turn offs are usually where the fun begins :D
  14. CavReconSGT

    CavReconSGT Just the right amount of evil.

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,372
    Location:
    CT/NH
    OK. So now I have a question. I was planning a ride (for several years) to Deadhorse and Tuk starting May 1. It was going to be for an epic 4 months since I recently retired. It is now looking like I may have to change those plans. I was originally looking very close at using the TCAT for parts of my rides. Now, it looks more and more like I won't be making this trip because of the COVID19 and not being able to go through the border. I would love parts of this trip but I hear mentions of RED sections. I haven't looked closely at the TAT and love some of this trip. BUT, there are certainly certain parts I would not be able to do, Are there sections indicating that they are crazy hard on the maps or GPX files? Some of the parts you are doing I would never attempt. You have earned my respect. I also usually travel solo and am unfortunately not as strong or fast as I use to be and am keenly aware at my age that I am breakable. Still adventurous but try to keep my limitations in perspective. Maybe all I need to know is if downloading the TAT will tell me all I need to know and if that is what you are following or are there other trails/roads that you are following? Again, congratulations on an epic report/ride, one of the best I've read and that is saying something.

    KR
    rudy4pl likes this.
  15. rudy4pl

    rudy4pl Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    100
    Oh man, that's unfortunate how things lined up. It's a good excuse to do the TAT now and Deadhorse-Tuk near year if the world doesn't self-implode :)

    I can't really speak much for Sam's original tat tracks, but I would assume they would be a little bit more organized and updated much more frequently which would result in less surprises, as opposed to Kevin's tat tracks.

    Kevin's tracks have a main blue route and occasional detours (green=easier, red=harder), but you don't have to take them. I think when I checked out the gpx file on pc, I was able to select sections and they had comments which maybe warn you of what's ahead, but when I put it on my phone, that was no longer possible.

    I don't know when was the last time Kevin's tracks were updated, but it definitely seems like it must have been a good couple of years. Some sections that might have been slightly more harder initially are now easier, and vice versa. Plenty of closures, some private property, weather conditions can dictate if something is passable.

    The color coded sections don't always tell a full story. Some red sections are just slightly harder than a well maintained dirt road, while others are "proceed on a large adventure bike only if you're suicidal or want to get permanently stuck" (this especially in Colorado). Like I said, maybe there are some comments from the author clarifying the difficulty, but when I put everything on my phone, I was not able to see them. It was only green, blue and red.

    Even some blue sections in Colorado were very difficult, so it is highly advised to use your own best judgement when things get too sketchy and turn around.

    I was mainly sticking to the tat tracks, from time to time I'd have to ride off to find camping and sometimes sticking to the line got dull so I decided to do a little bit of exploring to keep things fresh. There are many stunning places to see and experience regardless which route you decide to take.

    Thank you for the kind words and keep us posted on your adventures!
    CavReconSGT and snglfin like this.
  16. rudy4pl

    rudy4pl Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    100
    August 19, 2019 Mon (Day 27)

    (a)
    [​IMG]

    Water supply gets depleted very quickly in these surroundings and it is a scarce resource if not prepared. I have to be careful not to waste too much on anything other than drinking as there is very little left in my supply.

    The day started as it concluded yesterday, mild dirt tracks through countless remote mesas. It is really vital to to be scanning the road conditions +/- 20 feet ahead constantly as sand and other obstacles can sneak up on you at any given moment.

    Up ahead, there lies another turn off that quickly turns into some very deep sands. I proceed for a couple of miles trying to improve my riding ability in such terrain, but when I look at the length of this detour it appears to go on for like 30 more miles. It is noon and if it was any other place that wasn't so damn hot, I would have continued with my limited water supply. It is not any other place and frequent water sips are necessary in order not to dehydrate myself. I turn around to link up to the main route which proves to be tough in itself as it still features plenty of deep sands.


    My phone which I use as a gps has died as it either overheated in this weather, or my charging system is malfunctioning even though recently I have purchased a new charging cable. I have a usb charger that holds 2 ports and is advertised as 2.4 amps each port. It was getting close to that initially on the trip, but lately it has been very quirky. It seems like a lot of variables affect the charging capacity such as the weather, the 2 electronics that I'm charging together, the usb cable itself, the angle the usb cable is connected to the item, the vibration of the bike, etc. It sometimes charges fast and sometimes charges so slow that it's unable to provide more power than a turned on phone screen consumes, resulting in the phone battery totally discharging. GoPro camera batteries, Drift camera batteries, DSLR camera batteries, harddrive, gps, cell phone, satellite communicator, all of these items need to be recharged periodically, some more frequently than others, but all are charged off of the bike. It was already tough juggling my electronics when the charging system was working properly, now I'm just trying to prioritize in order to stay afloat.

    Upon my arrival in town, I was greeted by a driver running a stop sign and forcing me to hard brake which resulted in my rear wheel locking up. I remain calm as such occurrences are fairly common when riding in New York City.

    "Did you see that, she almost hit you!" says the patron at the gas station.

    "Yeah" I reply.

    I buy my gas and realize how expensive the water is here, so I only purchase a liter.

    The surroundings are once again changing, but it's something that I'm already familiar with. My beloved red soil, mesas and canyons are slowly becoming extinct. The soil is browner, the grass is greener and the trees are growing lusciously.
    2019 Trip (558).JPG


    I'm chugging through some fairly technical forested rutted tracks. There are some very steep sections that are hard packed and covered with a thin sheet of loose dirt and rocks. Momentum is very vital here. I manage to complete most climbs with relative ease, but soon I reach a very steep one that is literally a 45 degree climb. I decide to hit it full force without checking it out first on foot. I've climbed the first section and figured it was over, but behind a blind right turn it kept climbing, this is no place to stop now, I have to keep moving to clear it. Another blind turn to the left greets my eyes with once again an extremely steep climb. At this stage, my momentum is gone. My rear spins out and my bike starts sliding back. The bike falls over really hard to the right and I'm able to get my leg out just in time. I feel like my defensive instincts have been treating me pretty well.

    (Much steeper than it appears on video)

    The next hour and a half is an exhausting ordeal consisting of taking off all the luggage and carrying it up the steep hill which wrapped for a couple of turns, all in multiple grueling trips. I'm able to ride up with an unloaded bike much easier, but with still plenty of trouble. I load up, ride on and shortly after come across a sweet overlook.
    (a)

    I arrive at the next big town which happens to have a walmart. I'm hungry and the sun is slowly setting, I have to hurry as finding a place to camp in the dark is not fun.

    Too much stuff was purchased, but when shopping on an empty stomach, everything looks overly delicious. I cut up all the portions in the parking lot and place everything in watertight zip lock bags, while snacking on some canned peaches.

    "I wish I could travel like that as well" he says while pointing to his two rowdy daughters in the backseat :D.

    "Yeah, because everyone wants to be a dirty hobo stuffing lettuce into bags and cutting up fish in Walmart parking lots" I reply with a wide grin on my face.

    I leave in a hurry as the sun has already set and it is getting dark now, hopefully there will be a place to camp along the way.

    In the pitch darkness I spot a rock ring, yay a legit camp spot. I set up my tent in a hurry and start preparing dinner. I have to keep moving as there are a lot of large red ants and I do not want these on me. I hear something moving down the road from where I had come from. I look up, but my dying head torch can only light up their eyes. About 10 pairs light up, what the fuck :yikes.

    "Mooooo"

    KIMG0214.JPG
    I eat up and decide it's time to hit the sack. I've been battling with my tent zippers ever since I got caught in a massive thunderstorm earlier in the trip. This place is filled with massive ants that I do not want a part of and my damn tent zippers won't zip up now at all after trying every trick. I find a fix online directing me to use pliers on the slider. While getting the pliers out, I notice that my tool tube is badly worn out from the tire rubbing into it. There is a large hole in it. The problems are just piling up, I'll have to deal with them tomorrow. I manage to get the sliders to work and I'm finally able to crash under the stellar sky.
    juno, bomose, lanztek and 10 others like this.
  17. qmacker

    qmacker Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2009
    Oddometer:
    27
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    Great trip report. You are a warrior!
    rudy4pl likes this.
  18. rudy4pl

    rudy4pl Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    100
    August 20, 2019 Tue (Day 28)

    In the morning I decide to go back into town to take care of my laundry. It's a good time to do an assessment of all my gear and issues in the meantime.

    - drift helmet mount = broken
    - rubber cement containers = punctured and splattered all over
    - spare oil filters = badly damaged and ripped. they're unusable now
    - oil level = low
    - tool tube = destroyed
    - aux light = broken
    - gps = not working properly
    - charging system = not working properly
    - brakes are making a very loud screeching sound, it sounds as if a train is coming
    - saddle bags = vast majority of straps are ripped off, large holes in the bags all around
    - rear tire = quickly wearing out
    - rear suspension = something is off, the bike is sitting much lower
    - there is a pretty significant oil leak from around the throttle arm
    - tent = full of patched up holes and zipper problems
    - tripod = destroyed
    - chain = seems to be giving out
    - speedometer cable = bye bye
    - metal parts found in the oil = no problem

    Did I mention I lost my rain suit and my folding knife yesterday?

    Ohh, I also just got stung by a bee.

    I fix my camera mount and head out. About an 1.5 hours in my gps completely discharges again and shuts off. I was only getting .30 amps on the charger and then it dropped to 0. There are many turn-offs on this road, I don't think it's wise to proceed blindly.

    I smash the charger on the handlebar and the amperage jumps to .30a. I smashing it again in hopes that it jumps to .60a, but the whole unit just shuts off. I think the charger has just reached the end of its life.

    2019 Trip (562).JPG
    I turn back trying to navigated back into town the same way I got here which was a little bit tricky as there were plenty of turn offs and forks in the road. In town I had visited a couple of places in order to find a new charger. I ended up buying a cigarette lighter usb charger as I have an sae to cigarette cable. I give it a test but it seems to be working very poorly. Damn, I should have bought the charger from walmart as it came with a direct connection to the battery. Maybe my wiring job has gotten screwed up and going around the whole system and straight into the battery might be the solution. I decide to try charging my gps through a wall outlet in the walmart, it does not want to charge...

    In these dark times, I resort to my first eat-out meal on this trip at Burger King. I needed a cool place and some wifi to try to google some alternate possible solutions. My appetite seems to be off the charts, I end up eating two full meals like a proper American (just kidding) haha. I connect my gps phone to the wall charger and it surprisingly starts charging, what the fuck. It's like there is no logic to this, it just does as it pleases. I stay there for like 2 hours in order to get both of my phones charged and then I leave. I decided to take off my remaining aux light as it was noisy from being loose and wouldn't tighten. That's one less new noise the bike stops making.

    I head out and the phones are still slowly discharging even when plugged in, but it might be enough to get me through today, after all, most of the day is already lost. I pull off of the dirt road and find a sneaky spot through the thick bushes overlooking the mountains. From time to time I get nose bleeds during dry winters. I get one right now, I guess it's from the arid climate. I start spelling out the word "help" with the droplets on the dry soil as I'm pretty overwhelmed with all the issues: H E L ... and then the nose bleed stops. Damn, this would be pretty fucking creepy if somebody randomly came across this haha

    2019 Trip (564).JPG

    A lot of all terrain vehicles pass by late into the night lighting up the greenery next to my tent. I decide to think of some troubleshooting steps for tomorrow morning:

    1. Inspect the wiring for any damages.
    2. Connect the battery charger directly to the battery in an attempt to see if the wiring is damaged.
    3. Can it be the motorcycle stator? If it was, I don't think it would affect the amperage output, it would simply kill off the battery as it's unable to keep it topped off. Maybe I could diagnose it with a voltmeter.
    4. Bad battery? I could probably diagnose this with a voltmeter as well.
    5. Maybe simply my old SAE usb charger went bad and the new stuff that I purchased is not really compatible with motorcycles?

    I need some rest, I'll try to answer these questions tomorrow.
    juno, lanztek, Themastermike and 6 others like this.
  19. PL09

    PL09 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2007
    Oddometer:
    16
    Location:
    Redondo Beach
    Just found this, I'm in awe. Great report!
  20. rudy4pl

    rudy4pl Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    Oddometer:
    100
    August 21, 2019 Wed (Day 29)

    In the early morning I started troubleshooting before even breaking camp. I take off the plastics, seat and the gas tank in order to get to the wiring. I accidentally hit the petcock and spill a good bit of gasoline (this might have been needed). I check all my wiring to and from the relay. It all seems fine. I check the bolts on my battery terminals and it seems like the positive bolt was slightly loose, I tighten it. Not much else can be checked right now without a voltmeter and a new charger with battery connectors. I put everything back together and the original usb charger that I smashed on the handle magically came back to life (the battery bolt definitely did not bring it back to life as the display was completely shut off yesterday), maybe it just needed a break from me. I then realize it's giving out 1.5 amps per port, holy shit, maybe the loose bolt really did the trick. I feel like I overthink things and think of the worse, while it's just the little things that go wrong.

    I pack up and ride out. The charger topped off both of my phones to 100%. Throughout the day the amperage slightly dipped, but it still never went below 1.2 amps per port, which is a whole lot better than 0.3amps.

    2019 Trip (565).JPG

    As the day progresses, I started once again dropping in elevation and it started to get hotter. I've come across a red turn-off which would increase the distance to the next town. I must be running low on gas, but figured I'll still have enough. About 10 miles in, the throttle response starts cutting in and out.



    The bike dies and I'm under the impression that I still should be well above the reserve. I take off the gas cap thinking maybe it's not allowing air to come in and is creating a vacuum. I don't make the diagnosis too scientific as I also turn the reserve on. The bike fires up after a while and I have to be very frugal with my gas usage as I might have just hit reserve. I don't know how difficult this section will be, but I will definitely not make into town if I'm going to backtrack for 10 miles. I proceed forward and luckily it's very mild in difficulty, so I'm able to go easy on the throttle.

    I hit the slab. 8 miles out of Baker, Nevada, the bike dies again, I'm definitely out of fuel now. I disassemble the bike, take off the gas tank and let the remaining gasoline in the right chamber pour to the left side. I guess I could have just dropped the bike onto the left side, but I did not want to go through the struggle of picking it back up in this heat. I put her back together and she fires right up. 2 miles out of Baker, it dies. That's as far as I can get. Do I now take off one of my gas containers, leave the bike, walk 2 miles to the gas station and then walk 2 miles back? Or push the bike 2 miles to the gas station? Not sure which one is easier.

    Shortly, one of the town worker pulls over and asks if I needed help with anything. She doesn't have any spare gasoline on her, but she radios her colleague. After a couple of minutes he arrives with a jerry can. I tilt my bike slightly to the left as he pours it in. We try a couple of times, but the bike does not want to start. He takes a rag, covers the tank hole and blows into it to create pressure. That's a neat trick, I'll have to remember it for the future. The bike fires right up and I'm able to get to the gas station. Some nice folks, they didn't even want to be compensated for the gasoline.

    I continue riding through the desert in Nevada. At one point I hear metal clinging, it is my chain guard that partially broke off. I unbolt it and tie it to my top bag so I can dispose it in the next town.

    Deep sands are starting to be a norm here. It's later in the day so I don't want to face the struggle of dropping and picking up the bike. I try "walking" it with both of my feet on the sands, but it turns out that traveling like this is draining and slow.

    I hit it, stand up on the pegs and shift all my weight back while gripping the tank with my legs.



    After two or so hours, I come across a sandy section that I'm not prepared for and eat it. My left foot is trapped and twisted awkwardly under the saddle bag. Luckily it's nothing serious and I'm able to continue. Shortly, I verge off-road and ride into the "forest", which consisted of a couple dispersed trees, for the night.
    juno, Oldschoolrocker, MYUMPH and 4 others like this.