A ride without a destination

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by wittyusername, Sep 7, 2019.

  1. wittyusername

    wittyusername This is the spot for my custom title

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    That’s it. I’m officially wheels up. Spent the day finishing up some errands and saying some last minute goodbyes.

    Picked up a different stove and swapped out the little hammer for a small hatchet.

    I didn’t have time for a proper gear shake out. So, I’ll have to make adjustments on the fly - if necessary.

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    #81
  2. Baja_Bound

    Baja_Bound Been here awhile

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    I am following along and appreciate the photos to complement your writing. Both writing and photos are outstanding. Other than the GoPro, I did not see a camera listed in your very well thought out packing list (unless I missed it). If you are willing to share, what camera, lens and photo editing software are you using and will you use the same on the road?
    #82
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  3. wittyusername

    wittyusername This is the spot for my custom title

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    Thank you. Believe it or not I'm just using my iPhone for pictures / video. I bought the new iPhone specifically for the camera and specifically for this trip. I haven't had time to edit anything other than a crop here and there. I don't use filters other than Portrait Mode on the iPhone.
    #83
  4. Baja_Bound

    Baja_Bound Been here awhile

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    Wow! I am so old that I remember when a phone was just a phone. :jack

    Safe travels and best of luck with the Race for the Wounded.
    #84
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  5. red bud

    red bud alky w/motorcycle problem Supporter

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    ride safe, good luck
    #85
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  6. wittyusername

    wittyusername This is the spot for my custom title

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    I didn't put that many miles on my first day but the journey has begun! My riding suit still had the new suit smell. My helmet visor was bug free. And my bike was clean as a whistle. I'm going to remedy that as soon as possible.

    It's incredible how much more gas my bike drinks now that it's loaded up. I don't mind the fuel stops because I enjoy the breaks. I'm sure my fuel efficiency will increase as I drop weight and modify my packing list. I know for sure that I have too much food with me. For no particular reason I didn't photograph my food in the layout. Maybe I have too many regular clothes also.

    Tropical Storm Nestor was flooding parts of the state but nothing was going to keep my from moving forward. It was a fast moving storm (west to east). So, I decided to ride up the west coast of Florida and get behind it. It was a smart move because I only hit rain for 1-2 minutes. Just enough water to baptize my journey.

    I spent the night at a good friend's house in Seminole, FL. It's difficult to make new friends as an adult. Especially for an introvert who typically dislikes everyone he initially meets. My trust is difficult to earn. I typically don't connect with civilians for a multitude of reasons that aren't important right now. I met Petr through a friend of my wife. I try to surround myself with like-minded people...people who I look up to or people who inspire me. I always feel that it's important to respect your friends.

    I was a few miles from Petr's house and something interesting happened....here's the lead up...

    A week before I was wheels up and during my scramble to get ready...strangers were constantly asking me what I was up to. As I was completing XYZ task, I'd briefly mention that I was gearing up for a long ride. It was a way to justify my 'odd' behavior or weird request. They'd have a million questions that I didn't have time to enterain. I'd then ask for a pen and write my Instagram account name on a piece pf paper. "Give me a follow if you're interested in keeping up." I did that about a dozen times before I decided to make business cards with my Instagram and e-mail on it. I think it was a smart move because I've already given away about 30 cards to curious people. I keep a small stack in the top of my tank bag. It makes the trip seem more 'official'.

    So...I was about 10 minutes from Petr's house. It was already dark. I'm at a stop light and the car in the next lane yelled over, "Where you headed to?!"

    For convenience I simply said, "I'm going around the world...today is day 1."

    I thought...oh...I should give them a card. The light was still red but they were behind me a little ways. I get the card out but the light just turned green. I thought it'd be cool to hand them the card as I'm riding.

    The girl riding shotgun was early 20-something. She took off her hat and her long brown hair was flying in the wind. She's all smiles as she's hanging out of the window to grab the card. Both arms extended outward with open hands. Putting way too much trust in the passenger door. Luckily they were on my left side so I could actually work the throttle. She was wearing a low cut halter top. As she's reaching for the card, her halter top fell down and one of her titties popped out. Hah! It was hilarious. I stayed on task / on throttle and put the card directly into her hand. I took the next turn and couldn't stop laughing. She was a champ though. She, too, stayed on task until she grabbed my card...titty out and all.

    Petr and I had a few drinks and caught up. It was good to see him. He grew up in Communist Czechoslovakia. He's more proud to be an American than most Americans I know. He has the difficult task of raising a teenager with autism on his own. He's constantly teaching his son the important lessons that most fathers fail to do. I've never seen a man take such an active role in teaching his son how to be a man - an honest man.

    Petr gave me a gift for the road. In addition to being a K9 trainer, he's also a skipper / captain who's sailed around the world a few times. He gave me the pendent that he carried with him to keep him safe. He told me that this pendent will bring me back.

    I left his house this morning and I'll be visiting family in Central Florida. Right now, I'm sitting at Uncle Pete's house on the front porch while he picks up my Aunt Martha. I haven't seen them in years. I gurantee she's going to pinch my cheeks and remind me of the time I threw up on her when I was 6 months old.

    My uncle Pete...another inspiration. He's a Vietnam Veteran who, on his 70th birthday, rode his bicycle from Pensacola, FL to Key West, FL. Across the panhandle and then all the way down to the southern tip of Florida. Maybe this is in my blood.

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    #86
    Polebridge, wilfred, Foiler and 9 others like this.
  7. wittyusername

    wittyusername This is the spot for my custom title

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    Thank you. I plan to do a big write up about RFTW and Colin Edward's Boot Camp soon. I had to pace myself since my time was so limited. I should have more time to write soon. I can't wait to share what RaceForTheWounded is doing. As with most things...it's all about throttle control. I had to throttle this thread. I didn't want to skim over all the good they've already done.
    #87
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  8. red bud

    red bud alky w/motorcycle problem Supporter

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    kodak moment missed :lol3



    bet ya have a bunch of these on your travels
    #88
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  9. wittyusername

    wittyusername This is the spot for my custom title

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    After an incredibly relaxing morning at Uncle Pete’s (and Aunt Martha’s) house, I backtracked about 90 minutes over to DeLand.

    Riding back to DeLand was a necessary stop because St. Janice wanted to give me a gift for the road. If you don’t know who St. Janice is then please read my ADV thread (linked above). That’s the journal where I’ve been more active. Some of the most important people in my life believe in the healing power of crystals. St. Janice believes the same. She left the back door to her house open so I can visit the cats and pick up my gift. She gave me a Cat’s Eye crystal pendant. A very fitting gift and one that I’m thankful for.

    I rode through some heavy rain and wanted to put in some big miles to make up for the detour. I rode until it was too dark to bother finding a campsite. Spent the night at a Super 8 Motel. I wanted to sit and write for a bit...but I was asleep by 9 o’clock.

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    #89
  10. wittyusername

    wittyusername This is the spot for my custom title

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    I didn’t think I’d end up at the mechanic shop so early on my trip. No big deal.

    I noticed some oil leaking from a gasket when I was inspecting my bike this morning. I thought I had it fixed but the other shop sealed the wrong gasket. Or maybe both had a leak and the other shop only sealed one. No big deal...I’m keeping this Zen feeling. I’ll be more specific for you hear heads tomorrow.

    Pensacola BMW will have it fixed up tomorrow afternoon. Max, the service manager was intrigued about what I was up to and called around to see if he could get me a couch to sleep on at the former service manager’s house. That was super cool of him. I’d be at his house right now if the dude’s grandkids weren’t visiting. That’s a real classy move that I appreciated. I didn’t mind that it didn’t work out because I was looking forward to camping tonight.

    My GPS also shit the bed. I started acting strange a few days ago. Locking up. Slow to track movement and causing me to miss turns. I thought I just had to many tracks loaded up. I erased everything but it still wouldn’t navigate properly. So, I have a new GPS...and this thing is badass. It’s Streets Ahead of my Zumo.

    I’m sleeping in my tent tonight at Ft. Pickens State Park. It’s the 2nd prettiest sunset I’ve ever seen in my life. Second only to Mauna Kea in Hawaii

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    #90
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  11. wittyusername

    wittyusername This is the spot for my custom title

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    I decided to fix that oil leak while I was in Pensacola. The oil was coming from the weeping hole on the right side of the engine - which is ‘sort of’ a normal function of the bike. If given the choice, I’d rather the bike not leak oil than leak oil.

    I met up with a good friend in New Orleans. Remember when I said that I prefer to surround myself with people I respect and look up to? Joey is short as hell but I look up to him in a lot of ways.

    I met Joey while contracting. Like me, an injury ended his contracting career. He’s a serial entrepreneur. I met him at his office around 8pm where I found him still hard at work. I respect his hustle because I know exactly how it feels to wear his shoes.

    We stayed at his business partner’s apartment down in the French Quarter. Burnon Street and the French Quarter were on my list of things to see. Fortunate for me, we were 1 block over from Burnon Street.

    I parked my bike on the curb and unloaded my gear into Joey’s SUV.

    What a weird place. I was more interested in the architecture than the debauchery. And debauchery was a plenty. It’s amazing how people can be so carefree and vulnerable while out in public.

    I had a fried alligator po’boy sandwich with a burbon while on Burnon Street. While we were walking I realized that I didn’t even know what day it was.

    “I can’t believe how busy it is on a...wait...what day is it?” It was a Wednesday.

    Joey has a busy Thursday so it was an early night. I was wheels up and rolling by 5:30am. Just in time to catch the sunrise.

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    #91
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  12. Metalcarver

    Metalcarver Geezer Berserker Supporter

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    Head west. Probably going to be a couple weeks of excellent riding. Cold but dry.

    6 - 10 day forecast.

    Snow

    Oh, and if you're going through Death Valley and some geezer flips you off - it's just a gesture of respect and admiration.:ksteve
    #92
  13. wittyusername

    wittyusername This is the spot for my custom title

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    Let’s talk about my riding experience, the time we stood on the podium at the Baja 1000, RaceForTheWounded.com, and how I was invited to attend Colin Edward’s Texas Tornado Motorcycle Bootcamp.


    I bought my first motorcycle in Nov 2011. It was a brand-new black and gray BMW f800GS. The very same one that I’m still riding today. That’s right…this is my first bike. It’s the only bike I’ve ever wanted. How I ended up choosing this bike is a whole other story…


    Whenever I meet fellow riders, I typically ask, “So what do you ride?” I ask that question simply because I’m polite and everyone’s favorite subject is themselves (and their motorcycles). People who own motorcycles like to talk about their motorcycles – and I like to listen. They tell me they have this bike or that bike. R90, X45, Ducati bla bla with duel flux capacitor twin go-fasters. I smile and say something like, “That’s a lot of bike man.” People expect me to know what they’re talking about. But honestly, I really have no idea what most of that stuff means. It’s not that I don’t care…it’s just not important to me to know every motorcycle or everything about every motorcycle…and…well…I don’t care.


    Everyone remembers the first time they fell in love. The butterflies in their stomach. The sleepless nights. The bad decisions. I still get butterflies in my stomach when I look at my bike and imagine all the places we’re going to see together. She’s my first bike…my first motorcycle-love.


    In 2013 I rode my bike from South Florida to Wyoming and back. When I was 30 minutes from my house and the trip was ending, I remember thinking that I didn’t want the ride to end. I wanted to turn around and do it all over again. I’ve lived my life full of chaos and danger…I now find comfort in the chaos and comfort in the danger. I’m not reckless and I’m certainly not careless. Planning for a trip and riding my bike is a calculated risk that energizes me. It’s the closest civilian feeling to prepping for - and executing - a high-value-target raid. That’s my ‘normal’. Maybe that’s why I feel ‘at home’ when I’m taking a ride.


    In Nov 2011, I bought my bike from the BMW dealership in Orlando, FL. I requested they deliver it to where I was staying in Jacksonville, FL. I was embarrassed to tell them I was too nervous to ride it that far. I’m an Army Ranger…we’re not supposed to show fear. The only motorcycle I’ve ever rode was during my motorcycle endorsement class for the DMV…and that was about 2 years earlier. Hell, I was even terrified during my test ride before I bought the bike. I remember thinking that they were nuts to throw me the keys and let me take a test ride.


    I remember asking them how many times I’m allowed to dump it before I had to buy it. They laughed. I wasn’t joking. Note to self…recognize the social cues and participate in the laughter to appear normal. Check.


    I wouldn’t let them see my fear. I wouldn’t give them, or anyone the satisfaction. The easiest way to overcome fear is to pretend that you’re not scared. So, I pretended to be a confident rider.


    Once they unloaded my bike and drove off…I didn’t know what to do next. I felt like a new parent at the hospital who was left alone with their newborn baby for the first time. “What do you do with this thing?” Simple…don’t drop it and feed it when it’s empty.


    I rode my bike around a quiet suburb neighborhood for about 50 miles before I was comfortable enough to make that right hand turn and ride on the main road. My heart was pounding…it was amazing. I put about 500 road miles on my bike before I put it in storage and deployed back to Afghanistan. I was hooked. I was obsessed. I was in love.


    This is the deployment where I met Brett Robinson (Cornbread82 on ADV). Once I landed at our main hub in Afghanistan, I took another plane and then a helicopter to my final destination in the middle of beautiful nowhere. This location was as beautiful as it was dangerous. Brett arrived shortly after I did. At this point I only spoke to Brett once for 2 minutes about a year earlier. Someone told me that Brett was into motorcycles – indeed he is. I learned that he completed the TAT a few weeks before he deployed on this trip.


    We quickly became friends. I was drooling over his GoPro footage. I’d never seen anything like that before. We watched his footage for hours at a time. We talked about motorcycles, the TAT, and all the gear I’d need for a TAT run on my brand new GS. I’d spend nights looking up motorcycle gear, camping gear, and putting everything in my shopping carts while hearing rockets / mortars impact in the background. Then the next day we’d talk about said gear.


    That’s it! It was decided. I was going to ride the TAT when I got home in 4 months. I had everything planned. All I needed to do was learn how to ride my motorcycle. A minor detail. After weeks of TAT talk…Brett casually asked, “What do you know about the Baja 1000?”

    “What’s that?”

    Like a drug dealer giving the first taste for free, he threw “Dust to Glory” into the DVD player.

    Holy shit! Let’s do that!

    I’ve seen hundreds of ideas and plans come and go while on deployments. Most people don’t follow through with whatever they plan for their trip home. To be completely honest, I didn’t really think we’d actually race in the Baja 1000. Part of the fun is to plan I suppose. We eventually ran out of motorcycle stuff to talk about and settled into the daily routine of contractor business…then Ivan Loomis joined us.

    Brett and I were sitting in the team room one afternoon not talking about motorcycles. Ivan was on his computer minding his own business. One of us eventually mentions the Baja 1000. Ivan’s a quiet dude…he’s sort of like a robot. I really like Ivan. He’s an interesting character.


    He perks up and quietly says, “The Baja 1000? Oh, I’ve done that.” Then goes back to his computer.


    Wait…what!? He now had our full attention.


    When Ivan got out of the Marines he maxed out his 2 credit cards and outfitted a 1989 Toyota Tercel to race in one of the most dangerous off-road races in the world. Holy shit is right. He chopped up the frame and turned this family 4 x 4 into a Desert War Wagon. (See below for the full story)


    Brett and I were like 2 giddy schoolgirls listening to Ivan tell us about his race. He welded a stop sign under his Toyota as a skid plate. He built and welded his roll cage himself. No ventilation system. No suspension. He was the only vehicle in the Baja 1000 line up with a working tape deck and speakers. He was blasting Metallica until he had to salvage the speaker wire to keep his lights working.


    That’s it. If Ivan did it after he got out of the Marines and after maxing out 2 credit cards…then two rock star contractors could do it. It was settled. Holy shit what have I gotten myself into…I committed to racing in the Baja 1000 and I’ve never even rode a motorcycle on dirt before. My learning curve was going to be vertical.


    We decided early in the planning process that we should try to raise money for wounded veterans. If we’re going to race in the Baja 1000, then we might as well do it for a good cause. This was getting more exciting!!


    We were naive to the ugly business of big-box non-profits when we first started this endeavor. We should have conducted more research into the charity we were supporting before we committed to supporting their executives. A year later and at the end of our race, we raised $50,000 for the Wounded Warrior Project (only 28% of that $50,000 went towards vets). I’m just as disgusted as you are.


    My brother-in-law is the commercial real estate agent who leased or leases their main headquarters building in Jacksonville, FL. He knows them from when they used to fill backpacks out of a storage unit. He leased that space to them too. A truly humble beginning that is only a distant memory of the cooperate machine that it is today.


    I was able to secure a meeting at their corporate HQ with an event coordinator - I don’t remember her title. My goal was to explain what we were planning to do, to educate the WWP on the Baja 1000, explain why we were racing in the Baja 1000, and what kind of support we’d like from them. I thought they’d roll out a red carpet. Again…so naive.


    This is the most dangerous and most difficult point-to-point desert race in the world. Yet, they treated us (me) like we were racing in a weekend fun-run down the street. I was hoping to secure the backing / support of the WWP. Instead, they gave me a link where I could buy authorized WWP flags to fly while we were in Mexico.


    Their logo was important. She explained, in great detail…over and over again…how we were not to use their logo in any unauthorized way until we paid the sponsorship fees. Securing their logo was the main topic on her agenda instead of comprehending the magnitude of our goals. She was deaf to anything I had to say. She was more interested in showing off their obscenely extravagant showrooms and ensuring that I understood the rules and regulations how to properly display their logo.


    At the very least…can we have some stickers? The kids in Baja love stickers. I think she gave me 5 stickers. I don’t remember exactly how many they gave me. But, I remember being disgusted. I didn’t even want to take them. It felt dirty…like I was a bum on the street taking a nickel from a dude in a Rolls Royce. Five cents is five cents.


    Why didn’t we disconnect with the WWP straight away? I honestly thought they’d finally realize the magnitude of what we were doing and eventually get onboard to give their full support. It never happened.


    Well, where does all the money go? Where are your donations going? For starters, let me tell you about their extravagant corporate headquarters. When you exit the elevator and enter their main lobby – it opens into a beautiful atrium. It’s stunning. They cut the floor / ceiling out of the next 3 floors up. This created an open-air atrium. Why? Simply for aesthetics. It was a ‘build-to-suit’ lease.


    What a disgusting waste of your donations. Remember, they don’t own the building. My brother-in-law said, “You wouldn’t believe how much they paid to create the entrance atrium.” Correction…how much YOU paid.


    Thank you, Wounded Warrior Project, for showing us what a disgusting and greedy corporation you’ve turned into. Thank you for showing us that your six figure salaries are more important than helping the disabled veterans you parade around like toy dolls to elicit donations from naive patriots. You fucking disgust me. Our experience with your organization gave birth to something beautiful and honest.


    After finishing the Baja 1000 and taking 2nd place in our class, Brett decided to create his own non-profit. He named it, “Race For The Wounded” (RFTW). A 501c3 non-profit dedicated to helping disabled vets compete in off-road sporting events. 100% of the donations go back to helping vets. That’s ONE HUNDRED PERCENT of the money goes directly back into the program to help vets.


    This is the RFTW origin story told from my perspective. This is the ADV thread (below) where it all started. You’ll read about our excitement over sponsorships. You’ll read ride reports about our week-long trip to Baja where I learned how to ride a motorcycle on dirt. You’ll read how we raised money to fund our trip. You’ll read my extensive ride reports showcasing an honest, no-ego, approach to learning how to get the bike to the next rider. You’ll read about the amazing people we met along this journey and the magic of Baja.


    https://advrider.com/f/threads/baja-1000-for-the-wounded.787202/


    We took second place in our class in the 2012 Baja 1000…and I was still a lousy motorcycle rider. I had two sections of the race assigned to me. Both sections happened to be at night. After the race…in total…I rode a dirt bike 3 times at night in my life.


    How was I able to do it? Correction…how were WE able to do it? For starters, I wouldn’t fail my friends. Getting the bike to the next rider was my only concern. But that only gets someone so far.


    I’d like to say that no teammate was more important than the others, but that’s not true. None is this would be possible without Brett’s leadership. Brett is a retired 1SG with the 82nd Airborne and a former instructor at the Army’s premier combat leadership school – Ranger School. Remember, I strive to surround myself with people I look up to. And, I certainly look up to 1SG Robinson.


    When race day finally rolled around, this little Baja plan that Brett and I came up with while in the mountains of Afghanistan morphed into a logistical monster. Our original plan was to ride the Baja 1000 with an Elvis Presley cape flopping in the wind…trading the bike off between the two of us for 1,000 miles. On race day, we had 6 riders, 3 chase trucks, a 3-man film crew, and a bike named Elvis.


    We met a lot of amazing people while we were planning and racing down in Baja. I can’t talk about everyone but this post won’t be complete if I didn’t mention Big John Graves (Azcagiva on ADV) and Allen ‘Epic’ Diehr (HalfFast on ADV).


    In addition to being riders on our team, Big John and Epic Allen were our Baja guides. They know every inch of that peninsula and we couldn’t have made it across the finish line without them. If you’re looking for someone to guide you through Baja on a motorcycle, Big John Graves is the man to do it. (Epic Allen is busy with a new business).


    For no other reason than just being busy, I haven’t been active with RFTW. Brett lives in a different state and logistically it was impossible to be an active member of the RFTW team / program. Brett would tell me updates here and there over the years. It’s incredible how much good they’ve already done. They’ve helped a lot of vets. I’m looking forward to connecting with Brett next week to hear years of RFTW updates. I’ve been out of the loop. I’ll be sharing some of their success stories when I learn them.


    I’m looking forward to reconnecting. Good people and good times.


    For those of you who don’t know, Colin Edwards is a retired professional Moto GP racer. He’s a legend on the track and a Red White and Blue patriot. A real stand-up guy.


    Brett and Colin have become friends over the years. Colin is a big supporter of Race For The Wounded.


    Colin hosts a motorcycle bootcamp in Texas called the Texas Tornado Bootcamp. He’s built an amazing facility where he, and his world-class instructors, teach and refine motocross skills. They have a covered dirt track and the whole facility is outfitted like an old western town.


    For a few years now, Colin has been giving away 1 slot in the camp to a veteran in the RTFW program. Brett tells me that the vets who participate in the Boot Camp come out on the other side with life changing experiences. Sometimes, we simply need to feel part of a team again. A purpose. It’s a weekend with good people, good times, and motorcycles.


    A few weeks ago I sent this ADV thread over to Brett to let him know what I was up to. 10 minutes later he called me and told me I had a slot at Colin’s camp if I wanted one. It's a perfect start to my Ride Without a Destination. Maye Colin and his team of instructors can finally teach me how to properly ride a motorcycle.


    I’ve lived my whole life as a member of a team. It’s an empty feeling to look to my left and right and see my friends and teammates disappearing. I’m writing this journal and taking this insane trip to show you, the veteran, that there’s a mountain of support out there. You just need to look for it. Set your ego aside and let’s lead by example.



    www.RaceForTheWounded.com

    Brett@RaceForTheWounded.com

    Instagram: @RaceForTheWounded


    Colin Edward's Texas Tornado Bootcamp
    https://www.texastornadobootcamp.com/


    Ivan Loomis’s full Baja 1000 story

    Instagram: @Kit_Badger

    https://kitbadger.com/throwback-thursday-baja-1000-part-1/

    www.kitbadger.com

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    film.JPG


    Baja 1000 finish.JPG

    Baja 1000 hardware.JPG

    Baja 1000 pin.JPG

    RFTW Baja 1000.jpg

    Colin.JPG

    RFTW 1 Colin.JPG

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    #93
  14. X-wing fighter

    X-wing fighter Do or Do not, There is no try!!!!!! Supporter

    Joined:
    May 11, 2017
    Oddometer:
    441
    Location:
    Ester, Alaska
    Man I can't wait to read more! I watched dust to glory about 5 days after watching the long way round...... while deployed to Iraq. I've done lots of long distance riding, but I have never raced.

    In all my years of riding while I was in the military I was always the only dual sport/adventure rider in the group's I rode with.

    The snow has officially trapped me in Alaska for another winter, but this thread is fuelling the fires of freedom within me!

    Keep safe and keep writing!
    #94
    wittyusername likes this.
  15. Ol Man

    Ol Man Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,178
    Location:
    Apple Valley, Calif
    Wow...first, thanks for your service. You have lived an amazing life and this is looking to be an amazing ride report. I wish you an amazing adventure and a safe one.
    #95
    wittyusername and 2004ret like this.
  16. MrAndMrsZINC

    MrAndMrsZINC Snappin' necks and cashin' checks

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2015
    Oddometer:
    267
    Location:
    outskirts of Sticksville, Tennessee
    And thank you, for confirming what was heavily suspected about WWP.

    Great narrative.
    Following along still
    #96
  17. Cornbread82

    Cornbread82 Sir Crash A Lot!

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2008
    Oddometer:
    383
    Location:
    Georgia
    Hey Brother it will be great to be on a bike with you again soon. Let me start by saying Scott is a standup dude that we called the "BAJA BASKETBALL" we called him that because He hit the ground more than a basketball during a season in the NBA. Saying that he NEVER failed to get back on that bike and keep going. 2012 Baja 1000 changed my life forever, that team made me understand that I had some very deep seated problems myself that I never understood. That is when the lightbulb turned on and I knew what I wanted to do, that was help other Combat Veterans. After being injured in Afghanistan need a total reconstruction of my shoulder Benghazi happened and my wife wanted me to stop deploying. At this point I had RFTW up and running and my wife and I decided that I would just concentrate on that and let her work. This will be the first opportunity for Scott to see what he helped start that night long ago in the mountains of Afghanistan. He will not be alone we will also be bringing another veteran Mike Goines who will also be attending the camp with Scott.

    Looking forward to seeing you Brother, love ya ride safe and will see you soon.
    #97
    wilfred, cBJr, Foiler and 2 others like this.
  18. steved57

    steved57 Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2007
    Oddometer:
    822
    Location:
    East Texas
    Subscribed !! Dude I'm in and will be following along on here - safe travels and enjoy
    #98
    wittyusername likes this.
  19. brewer55

    brewer55 n00b

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2019
    Oddometer:
    3
    Location:
    Cleveland, GA
    I was at one time a proud financial supporter of the Wounded Warriors Project until I found out what you did that only about 1/4 of the money actually got to the vets that needed. I was also pissed off about that and my financial supported stopped right then.
    #99
  20. Themastermike

    Themastermike Think you caught me in a coma Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2011
    Oddometer:
    2,979
    Location:
    So Ill
    Not a highjack but to confirm, if they have ads on TV all the time with an expensive production and free to you blanket.... That is getting paid for somewhere.....out of the proceeds.
    Foiler, Cornbread82 and wittyusername like this.