A solo trip to Mongolia on a 125cc

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by guerreronegro, Apr 18, 2020.

  1. Gedrog

    Gedrog 1000 mile stare a 1000 stories to tell

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    Tinidazole is an antibiotic that is used to treat certain types of vaginal infections (bacterial vaginosis, trichomoniasis). It is also used to treat certain types of parasite infections (giardiasis, amebiasis). It works by stopping the growth of certain bacteria and parasites
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  2. live2ridetahoe

    live2ridetahoe BSN, RN, CEN, TCRN, MICN Supporter

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    I used it for the latter….

    Tahoe
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  3. Sumo64c

    Sumo64c Long timer Super Supporter

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    :photog
  4. Sumo64c

    Sumo64c Long timer Super Supporter

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    The home of my ancient ancestors, I have quite a bit of ancient Mongol / Golden Horde dna. I've always wanted to go visit Mongolia prior to discovering my ancient past. One day I will....... I greatly enjoy RR's that cover Mongolia, thank you for showing me the motherland of my ancestors. :clap

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  5. liv2day

    liv2day Life is about how you handle Plan B Supporter

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    Effin' outstanding @guerreronegro! So glad to read the food poisoning passed and you were able to sit down and enjoy a good meal. Sounds like a long day in the saddle, appreciate you posting the pics from the museum. And I'm pretty sure that is a golden eagle - that raptor is frickin' HUGE man. It'd be cool as hell to see one hunt and bring down prey.

    Still enjoying the report amigo, look forward to when you post next.
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  6. mikeped

    mikeped Adventurer

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    I, too, find this to be a fascinating read. Read from start to end. Well done. Please continue.
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  7. live2ridetahoe

    live2ridetahoe BSN, RN, CEN, TCRN, MICN Supporter

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    The hardest thing about going to Mongolia is the decision to go and to do it.
  8. guerreronegro

    guerreronegro Been here awhile

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    Rest day. After 52 days of adventures I was finally in Mongolia´s capital in one piece. It was hard to believe for all the people following me back home, only 52 days to get there. Doing it in less time is possible optimizing the route, and having some knowledge on how some of those border crossings operate. Regardless of this, I was happy with my itinerary and how this adventure had turn out so far. Surely, I have missed many things and interesting places to visit but not all can be accomplished in this time span. Most importantly, I proved to myself how enjoyable is to do this thing alone, and even though it might be scary at the beginning it is one of the most enjoyable ways of travel.
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    With those morning reflections it was time to cross down the cumulative items in the to do list in my head. Starting with the bike, we were in the right place to service it. Koji had likely the most complete workshop in the capital. Him and his wife had a property for which they have divided tasks, her taking care of first-class accommodation and Koji with the workshop for overlanders. His garage was full of foreign registered Africa Twins, KTM Adventures, BMW GSs and camper vans for people doing this trip in stages and coming later in the year to resume their adventures. There were also complex mechanical problems waiting to be fixed like a German guy with a vintage GS waiting for a spare cylinder head he had cracked after crossing a river. Koji also showed us previous visits of funny characters like a guy riding from Australia on a GSXR with off road tires.
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    I helped the guys service the bike. Koji and another Japanese overlander were fascinated by its engine size and they couldn´t believe each cylinder bore was 62cc. Apparently, they did not have this Varadero in the JDM. The air filter was filled in dust, so we just cleaned it and lubed it. Then the sprocket was changed for the other one I was carrying to solve the cruising problem given the better conditions of the road up ahead. They told me to watch out on the section from Ulan Bator going north to Ulan Ude in Russia as this was not paved. After that, Russian roads promised to be not in perfect shape but at least paved and their definition of decent. The brake could not be fixed because of a lack of spare parts for this model. They tried their best bleeding it but without the rubber seal it was a lost cause. We also changed the oil and with that I was ready to go. Jorge underwent a similar procedure but also changed the rear tire with a second hand one. He was having trouble with the Kardan seals but apparently it would be ok for him to make it to Vladivostok. Some of our contacts were sending us pictures of snow at both parts of Siberia so we had to prepare for increasing colder temperatures as September progressed.
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    The place was full of Japanese things, even the toilets were from Japan. A contrast compared to the last days of this trip. The couple was very hospitable and even let me use their personal computer to send a couple of long emails which also took me a while to decipher as everything was in Japanese. After crossing many things of the list, we went to the city centre to spend the afternoon visiting a Budhist Temple. The timing was not the best and given how north we were staying from the capital; it would take a considerable amount of time to go south. The finish line of the rally was in Ulan Ude, Russia; and at this point I was also running low on time and cash so to stay more time in a city capital. We decided to go there, buy some souvenirs, and then have some early dinner so to get some good rest for tomorrow. On our way there I gave the German guy a lift to the closest supermarket as he was without his motorcycle and his cylinder head would be arriving in the next days.
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    While in some of the sacred areas it was interesting to see some children dressed in monk outfits and how people came to perform their prays going in circles around a fire. Once again I missed having someone to explain the foundations of the place and ceremonies. As it was getting dark we went to the first restaurant we found on maps.me that happened to be Korean. The city of Ulan Batar was vibrant and we found tourists every place we went through. Traffic was also intense, but somehow easier to navigate while lane splitting the most congested parts without any luggage to carry. Upon arrival we shared the plans for tomorrow's ride and we decided to split paths as soon as I was not able to catch Jorge as the time constrains would otherwise undermine our compromises.
  9. live2ridetahoe

    live2ridetahoe BSN, RN, CEN, TCRN, MICN Supporter

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    Koji is a great mechanic. His shop is very clean and organized. I met him and visited his shop when I was in UB.

    Thanks for the update. Where did you stay when you were in UB?

    Tahoe
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  10. liv2day

    liv2day Life is about how you handle Plan B Supporter

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    Frickin' amazing @guerreronegro! 52 days of travel crossing so many borders, so many experiences; wonderful man. The sound of potential snow...ominous. Just riding in cold temps and dealing with potential hypothermia is awful, snow just makes it that much more treacherous.

    Look forward to what comes next man. Really cool to get your bike sorted as much as possible in that shop, and have the hospitality on top of getting the work done. What a great resource after making do for so long.
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  11. guerreronegro

    guerreronegro Been here awhile

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    Those yurts within the same compound next to the shop, first picture. Were those there in place when you were there or was it a new addition by the time I visited?
  12. live2ridetahoe

    live2ridetahoe BSN, RN, CEN, TCRN, MICN Supporter

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    So you stayed at The Oasis!

    Did you get a ger or stay in one of the rooms? Yes, the gers were there when I was there, tho I stayed in the shared room next to the parking lot.

    I met some great people there. It was like the nexus of the universe. I could tell you stories for hours about my time there...

    Tahoe
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  13. MotoSly

    MotoSly Been here awhile

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    been lurking for 2 days now. I am bingereading this for 2 days now at work ;)
    This is too good, and the best thing is, that you are doing it on a 125!
  14. guerreronegro

    guerreronegro Been here awhile

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    Yeah, we took one of those Gers with two beds. Indeed one cool place worth every penny. Season was about to close for travelers so not many people around when I stayed
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  15. guerreronegro

    guerreronegro Been here awhile

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    With the bike and I fully recovered we woke from the Ger at 7 AM next day with the intention of heading north and cross the Russian border one last time. At this point, my uncertainty levels were at its highest because I did not really know what was going to happen after I crossed the finish line in Ulan Ude. If the organisation would manage to secure the transport for a motorcycle back to EU territory, I would be taking a plane back home and then make arrangements to repatriate the bike. But this was not likely to happen as I had already been advised bikes were excluded, though there was some hope due to some ralliers discussing this option along the way. The next liable option if the cost and length were right, it would be to pay for its shipping to Moscow as both bike and rider must be together when exiting Russia else you have to go through a complex legal procedure involving an attorney. I would then take the Trans-Siberian train to the capital and spend some time there waiting for the bike to arrive so I could resume the trip. The last resort option was to keep riding through Siberia but I did not research how was the road conditions nor the distance I could cover each day. I should be home no later than the 20th of September, that meant if I had to go back I only had 18 days left.
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    We said goodbye to Koji and refueled on the closest petrol station. Initially me and Jorge started riding together through smooth tarmac but as it disappeared, I was not able to keep his pace, so we departed ways. The only paved section was about 100 Km. The rest of the day to the Russian border was a mix of dirt tracks with many parallel options as usual. The funny thing is that everything that was unpaved happened to be the main road going north, over 200 Km of really bad terrain with dense traffic and dust coming out cars and trucks. This part of the country was filled with mountains and hills going up and down and greener landscapes. Some of the parallel tracks were done recently un virgin soil, probably by trucks trying to skim time when the “main road” was busy. Some of these parallel options were dead ends as they were in really bad condition so I had to be focused on choosing the appropriate one. The weather started to get a bit colder with clouds blocking the sun but it was a bit of a relief after the heat endured down south in the Gobi area.

    I kind of missed riding alone, I was now able to stop freely to take some pictures without provoking delay in the group. In the last few days, I noticed I dropped at least 15 pounds in weight and in tough long days like this stage I was able to tell. I got lost a couple of times arriving to Darkhan and Orkhon taking a wrong paved road thinking it might be getting better. Eventually I make it to the Mongolian border and I saw a Spanish registered KTM adventure, I didn’t see the rider though as he exited the building on the other end as I entered. This border took no time, but the real bottleneck was on the Russian side filled with rally cars. I also saw Jorge, and the KTM rider, Manuel. When we introduced to each other he asked me if I could help him solve the paperwork as he only spoke Spanish and was having difficulties filling all his details. We soon empathized and he will become my next friend in this adventure. The Russians took their time looking for stuff on each of the cars with dogs and mirrors. In our bikes we had to open up all bags and show each little thing to the customs agents. It was definitely best to cross borders with no foreigners as these called too much attention from the authorities.
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    After three long hours we were back in Russia. Me and Manu decided to ride together to Ulan Ude and after organizing back our documents we started a race against the sun. Petrol stations in this part of Russia would only serve you upon payment. I still have some spare Rubles from last time as credit cards were not working in this particular place. The road got suddenly better so this made the last 100 Km easier to ride. We arrived in Ulan Ude at night and many places were fully booked so after three tries we settled in the most decent pension we could find. Tomorrow if we found a better place we would switch while I shorted transportation and rally bureaucracy.

    But the day was far from over. We decided to go have some dinner after checking in the hostel, and we ran into two drunken young boys in a supermarket as Manu had to buy a Beeline SIM card. The two inexplicably decided to join us for dinner and we ended up sharing table with them in a restaurant close to the main square. They were not drunk in a bad way, more like enthusiastic to see foreigners in their town and wanting to interact with us via translator. After hearing some details about the town, some jokes and drinking a couple more beers with them, we decided to finish this before it went out of hand. It was already too late and after a long day, it was challenging to be on a translator constantly just for interacting, and these guys seemed to be heavy drinkers anyways.

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  16. STBNE

    STBNE Southern Comfort

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  17. kiwial

    kiwial Allweatherrider

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    Koji is not next door to The Oasis anymore. He and wife opened 'Fortec Garage and Relax Guesthouse' on the other side of town.

    Epic journey Guerreronegro.
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  18. live2ridetahoe

    live2ridetahoe BSN, RN, CEN, TCRN, MICN Supporter

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    Good to know. Thanks for the update!

    Tahoe
  19. ricochetrider

    ricochetrider MotoMojo

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    Still brilliant after al the miles and days... Been keeping an eye out for updates, not sure how I missed these 2 last installments in your tale but happy to see them this morning!
    Cheers, it seems the adventure isn't over yet!
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  20. guerreronegro

    guerreronegro Been here awhile

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    Another rest day. After yesterday’s long ride it was needed and tere was much to take care of anyways. It was time to find out what sort of deal was out there to ship the bike to Moscow on that train. The best place to do this was to go to the central market and find someone who had a contact affiliated with the trains going to Moscow and who ideally would speak English. We took advantage and had some breakfast nearby where we could also exchange some currency. They happen to accept every single currency from ex USSR states so I got rid of all the small bills I was still carrying with me and convert them directly into Rubbles. Even the Turkmenistan bills were taken and at a very good rate for whatever reason…

    In the market we were redirected to a hostel located more in the city centre, close to the Lenin statue. This is also where the finish line was located so it was killing two birds with one stone. Manu needed to get some stuff in the nearby shopping mall so I went with him and got a couple new shoes as the ones I was carrying with me from home were destroyed. Ulan Ude had everything, and it was cool to get more in depth within Russia other than riding the country. People were surprisingly warm and nothing to do with the typical stereotype of Russian we have back home. All tried to help get us shorted with what we were looking for even though we did not understand each other. No need for Internet or phone, just old school style, with the sole exception of a translation app.

    From there we grab all our stuff from the room and ride the bikes to this other place full of overlanders, I guess this is why we were redirected here. The staff at the hotel called a biker and they told me he would arrive in the afternoon to give me a hand with the logistics. Manu also needed to make some maintenance on his KTM so the guy at the reception gave as a place in the industrial area were to go. We went out to a nearby supermarket to buy some food and cook it in the hostel. After that, I took a straight nap to wait for the biker and do all arrangements afterwards in the finish line. A cat at the hostel thought it would also be a good idea and decided to sleep right next to me.
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    When the guy came, he phoned the company next to me and gave me the news. Shipping the bike would take an approximate of 9 days and he remarked “if all goes well”. The shipping cost was not too bad though but I asked Manu if he had planned how long it would take him to ride to Moscow and it was about the same distance. He was going to go there anyways and even though I did not plan this it was starting to sound much better now. The next thing left for the afternoon was to go to the finish line and confirm what I already forecasted. I signed the paperwork for finishing the rally, took a couple pictures at the podium and then went with Manu to help him sort his KTM out. He got stuck in the Kazakh desert because of a fuel pump problem and the Kazakhs managed to put a Lada pump instead. The state of the art KTM was not liking it but with all the KTM dealers out there, and the summer season, no pumps seemed to be available.

    The guys at the rally gave us some beer passes to go later to a pub but even though this was a rest day I did not wanted to end up wasted and not being able to wake up early to start riding back. Iso far, stress was not bothering me at all, but now I really needed to get back ASAP and I was 6,000 miles away from home.
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