A solo trip to Mongolia on a 125cc

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by guerreronegro, Apr 18, 2020.

  1. DavidM1

    DavidM1 Unicorn hunting

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    I think the French words mostly arrived in the late Ottoman times with a modernising movement, e.g. asansör = elevator.
    Turkish itself is of the Altaic family of languages not Indo-European.
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  2. td63

    td63 Been here awhile Supporter

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  3. DavidM1

    DavidM1 Unicorn hunting

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    Asia Minor has always had a range of languages through the millennia. Intriguing ancient ones are Luwian, Hattic and Hurro-Urartian.
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  4. +venture

    +venture Been here awhile Supporter

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    I truly enjoy people who know more than I do....
    And there are a ton reading this thread!
    Keep up the riding, reporting, and ruminations. (Not quote the right word but I needed the ‘r.’)
  5. guerreronegro

    guerreronegro Adventurer

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    Today was going to be an intense one. Neither I nor Simon knew whether it was best to cross via Batumi or try the other border cross far east in Turkgozu. Simon realized all of a sudden he had to be the next day in the Irani embassy in Yerevan as he had booked his appointment for that day. I did not know exactly how he was going to make it, that was a crazy ride that could not be done in one go. He was a very easy-going guy, one way or the other he would make it. We spend the morning buying one of these portable 4G routers as we found out his phone was not unlocked. That way he could be connected and communicate a bit more than the basic predefined SPOT message we both carried. I took the chance and bought a new microSD card for the phone as I was running out of memory for pictures.
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    Bordering the Black Sea in the morning was a good way to start the day. After one hour and a half, we stopped for fuel and there was a nice place to eat our breakfast. This was also the point in which we would have to decide whether Batumi or border the mountain range separating Turkey from Georgia. With a full stomach we decided to continue in Turkey one more day, it was considerably longer but the road seemed to be good entertainment. I think we did good, if I was to repeat a section of this trip with a road motorcycle it would definitely be this one. I felt a bit sorry for Simon because he had a long way until Armenia although he seemed to be fine with it. He kind of assumed he was going to be riding long hours in the night. We passed three mountain passes with canyons and a couple of dams with very diverse landscapes as we went through. While in the restaurant we met a new friend, he was a truck driver and spoke a bit of English. Like the last day he showed interest in my religion. I tried to explain to him that although I was Christian, I did not practice much of the religion being more like a de facto agnostic. He responded his dream was to meet the Pope. At that point I thought he was just mocking me, but he seemed dead serious about it. I asked him if he was Muslim to what he said yes, but that he also liked the Pope. We had to leave the place as it was getting late, but that kind of gave me something to think while on the road.
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    After leaving the restaurant I realized I forgot my camera charger, so I had to turn back. I told Simon to continue but he decided to wait for me next to the canyon and walk through those bridges pending from a couple of cords and rotten wood like in the movies while waiting for me. That was a good 45 minutes lost of the day but I least I recovered the charger. Once back we kept going through the canyon and then up and down revving the bikes as if they were mosquitos. We got to a point that we were just exhausted, and we stopped almost every 20 minutes. In one of these stops a family on a pick-up truck approached us. It turned out the daughter lived in Madrid and spoke good Spanish. The father gave us some cheese from his farm and also handed me his business card to call him if I had any trouble on the way. This would be our last acquaintance in Turkey, what a great country to travel past, I would be coming back in the future for sure. The father says goodbye giving me a very effusive hug as if I was his son. Great people, what to say. They indicated we had easily one hour and a half more to the border. IMG_20190801_181918.jpg DSC02393.JPG

    It was clear by now that if we were to cross the border it would be in complete darkness. And so, like yesterday I had to turn on my fog lights to be able to see something in a very dark tarmac that just absorbed my light power. The altitude was translating into a refreshing night, so refreshing in fact that we had to stop at the very top of the last mountain to put all our clothes on and warm globes on. There was also fog, and the visor kept getting wet having to endure the freezing mist of about 42 Fahrenheit with the only protection of the windshield. Also, this was the point in which I started to see all cars driving with their high beams on making it all much harder. All of this was also part of the trip and so, although I was physically exhausted, my morale was in good shape. I took an example from Simon, who still had to ride a long way to Yerevan. He had to cross another border, but he was nonetheless in a happy mood.
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    Eventually we reached the border and had to take the coat off, it was again warm down there. Despite it was a bit late, around 10 PM, there were many teams in the process of crossing. I turned off the engine while waiting only to realize later I had drained the battery. Possibly due to having the fog lights on while charging everything up. The guard let me go to the next post and I had to walk with the bike to it, I will try to start it later with a push. We were told the Georgians don’t mess around and that they will register everything in the vehicle before proceeding. I was first, but for some reason the officer was not too interested in what I was carrying. He just asked me if I carry medical supplies and took my word for it. I did carry some Ibuprofen and basic stuff so I was pretty sure they would not be making a big deal out of that. He just let me go asking me to buy insurance in the first petrol station opened 24/7. I started the motorcycle with a push surprisingly easily, and I waited for Simon as I bought the insurance. A good advantage of having such a tiny engine is that with just a little momentum you are good to go. The place also did currency exchange and although it was not the most competitive, I changed about 60 € for 145 GEL, enough for a day or so I planned on spending in Georgia.
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    With Simon good to go, we fuelled the bikes and carried on to the next village with a pension, Akhaltsikhe. We found three English teams in a place with a restaurant, so we joined them for a well-deserved beer. The same place had one room available, so I just took it and came down again to also have some dinner. Simon did the same and after it, he was good to go to Yerevan riding 4 more hours. I wished him the best of luck; his spirit was just admirable despite the circumstances; I had a lot to learn from him. He told me he would find a place in which to rest for a couple of hours and then continue just before the Embassy closed.

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  6. guerreronegro

    guerreronegro Adventurer

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    It gets even more confusing as you head east where the indo-European languages also surround the Black Sea until the natural border of the Caucasus
    Caucaso tabla de lenguas.png
  7. DavidM1

    DavidM1 Unicorn hunting

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    ^ What an amazing map! Cheers.
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  8. td63

    td63 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Yeah, really interesting map -- amazing what a single mountain range will do to 3,000-4,000 years of human civilization(s)!
  9. DavidM1

    DavidM1 Unicorn hunting

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    That Türkgözü border crossing out of Turkey into Georgia looks like it's less busy than the Sarp one on the coast. Probably the one to go for. Noted, cheers.
  10. guerreronegro

    guerreronegro Adventurer

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    One good thing about this pension is that it had a full king size bed. The family receiving me yesterday were very nice and they gave me the last room they had. The place seemed to be just a regular house renting out the spare rooms as if it was an Airbnb. I liked it. After a warm shower last night, I fell asleep within seconds and woke up quite confused about the time. I texted Simon to see if he had arrived safe and hoped to get an answer at some point in the day. It was 8 AM on my watch but in reality, it was 9. I had to get going.

    The family owning the place was waiting for me outside with a nice breakfast ready on the table. I didn’t even bother to ask yesterday if it was included but I was in. I met this way, John and Jenny, from England and Australia, enjoying theirs on the next table. They were on vacation in Turkey and now Georgia and it seemed to me they were enjoying it so far as much as I.

    My objective for today was to change the tires, oil, and filters in Tbilisi. I did not know whether I should stay there one night or if to rather continue a bit more, that would depend on how long it would take to do this operation. I received an email from the place saying I should be there by 4 PM and I started to look at the map to see what I would be able to visit if I wanted to be there on time. There are some pretty cool caves in Vardzia, but it seemed to be a bit of a detour if I wanted to be there on time. Finally, I decided I would just stick to the road and if I found something interesting, I would stop briefly. On that note, the weather seemed to be unstable with high chances of rain, so it seemed to be a good idea at the time. Now that I am writing these lines, I regret not taking my time to visit these places. I guess things are quite different once in the field. I also received another message from a ferry fixer I was in contact in Azerbaijan saying there was a ferry the day after tomorrow going to Turkmenistan. If I could catch it, it would be the best way to avoid downtimes as I heard some teams have had to wait three days camped at the dock to jump into one. I wanted to avoid that at all costs even if that requires sacrificing time in Georgia or Azerbaijan.
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    I said goodbye to everybody in the pension and started to load the bike parked on the street. Akhaltsikhe is not very big, thus I wasn’t much afraid of what could happen to the bike. While loading the Varadero a local came to talk, he had looked at my license plate and recognized the country as he had some family in Barcelona. We couldn’t communicate very well other than body language and some random words but the fact he was so cordial made my morning.
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    Georgia felt very different, a completely different culture, yet it felt close. The Caucasus is indeed a very complex region to understand. The only things I knew about this country before arriving were the different alphabet, the orthodox religion, and that one of its ancient Kingdoms was named Iberia, the same as the Iberian Peninsula. I do not understand the correlation though.
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    I started the day in the Akhaltsikhe castle. The name Akhaltsikhe means literally a new castle and the place was occupied for a time by the Turkish, the reason why there is a mosque inside. I did not go in as I was afraid of spending much time inside and coming late to the appointment, so I limited myself to just go around it before moving on towards Borjomi. The road following the river was filled with monasteries. I decided to stop in one well-hidden in the woods. The place was full of Georgians and some Russians as I could see from the license plates. The path from the main road to the monastery was in bad shape but the forest had this magic feeling covering everything in a green tone. Probably this is why The green monastery owes its name to its greenish colored stones used in its construction. The place was raided many times despite being well hidden and the monks living there were killed. There were some ancient tombs next to it so I guess, this is where they left them.
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    I was running out of time, so I kept moving now towards Tbilisi. I had to find a place to eat something. I passed a couple of villages but all I could see was bakeries and butcheries besides soviet architecture and workshops matching the definition of a Batcave. Then rain started to come down and I stopped to put the rain gear. I was getting very hungry and so I looked something on maps.me to get me to the closest restaurant. This app, based on OSM works surprisingly well in these countries and I would be using it from now on constantly. Finally, I arrived at a place and it was huge, a wedding could be celebrated here no problem. The people there were very welcoming and let me ride the motorcycle almost next to the table I sit. I saw the menu but all I could read was the more than 20 types of vodka so I asked the girl for the most typical Georgian cuisine and waited protected against the rain updating the diary entries. IMG_20190802_140802.jpg
  11. liv2day

    liv2day Life is about how you handle Plan B Supporter

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    Great update @guerreronegro, what a fascinating place to visit and learn about. The shots of the castle and monastery are cool, so very different than anything you'd ever come across here. And I really like that picture of the menu - what an experience trying to order something aside from vodka :lol2 :lol2

    Appreciate you taking the time to post it :D
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  12. guerreronegro

    guerreronegro Adventurer

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    I find both Georgia and Armenia incredible places to visit. The geopolitical turmoil in this part of the world, unfortunately, makes it a bit more challenging to visit all of them in one go. Vodka would start to be the norm again starting in Turkmenistan in spite of their religion.
  13. guerreronegro

    guerreronegro Adventurer

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    Soon after my arrival the sky cleared; I didn’t have to worry about the rain anymore. I was given a mushroom soup and some salmon. Although these are simple dishes you can order everywhere, the Georgian touch was incredibly tasty. I was the only one in the place and a girl who spoke a bit of English came to start a conversation. Traveling alone I realized, makes this happen all the time. Somehow, locals do not feel intimidated as if you go in a group and come to talk to you. I appreciate it a lot. I don’t feel alone, although I am working most of the time on my phone with the diaries; and it also allows me to gain a bit more knowledge about the places I visit.

    The workshop was just 15 minutes away. I paid the bill, very little for the amount and quality of food, and moved to the workshop. I was arriving a bit late; I was not sure how time tolerant would the Georgian culture be. I did notice how the majority of cars were RHD, being most Japanese imports. It made me ride even more cautious as these cars have very limited visibility when driving on the right side of the road in secondary ones. I arrived at the place, but it seemed to be abandoned in a big avenue, only having left an old sign indicating the name of the place. Then a random guy that observed how lost I was, shouted at me indicating me to keep following the avenue. The workshop had moved a few blocks or so I understood that, and he was right. Soon I found it, and this seemed to be the biggest motorcycle shop and dealer in Tbilisi, it was massive.

    The guys there had a lot of work, but they understood I was traveling a long distance and soon made me space despite arriving late. I needed to buy a new battery as well and while the guys worked on it, I entertained myself looking at the merchandise and motorcycles exposed. I had to pay most of it in cash for some reason and since I didn’t have enough, I go look for an ATM almost a km away, a good walk to stretch my legs and see a bit of the capital even if it wasn’t touristic. The first ATM I found did not work with any of my cards and it seemed to be in very bad shape. I asked where I could find another. This one did work although it also felt like the kind of ATM in which they could clone your card no problem. Good thing I traveled with a prepaid card I filled on the go.

    Back in the workshop I had to wait half an hour more, so I looked at a plan for tonight. I didn’t really feel like going through the hassle of looking for a hotel in a very crowded city in which I could safely park the bike for the night. Plus, I did not really have a lot of time to visit the city if I wanted to be in the ferry terminal in just one day so I just decided to skip Tbilisi and cross the border just one hour away into Azerbaijan. Besides, I realized I had a Booking reservation in Ganja, from when I was planning this whole itinerary some months ago. Most of these reservations I had cancelled as I was following a slightly different itinerary but this one I forgot to. Since it seemed feasible in terms of distance, I decided to go for it knowing for a fact I would be riding once again at night. On the good side of things, this kind of informed I was doing good in terms of time so far despite the detours I had taken.

    I was charged only the equivalent of 30 EUR for the whole operation of changing the tires, oil, and filter. The battery was separate. Since the old road tires were not worn yet, I put them back in the crash bars, I would put them back in Russia if I had to come back via Siberia, which at the time I still didn’t really know. At this point, the tires hanging had become my spot of choice to put random things. The guys at Bikeland were not able in the end to find a rotor so I just had to continue like this. The staff was helpful, and I know for a fact they at least tried their best.

    Tbilisi was at its peak rush hour but after experiencing Istambul this seemed a piece of cake and I filtered traffic as I followed the Mtkvari river getting to see some of the statues, the Peace Bridge and the Narikala Fortress in the distance. As I approached the Azerbaijan border, I kept having second thoughts of my decision to skip this city. I guess if I wouldn’t have been travelling alone I would have been given the final to change my mind but I was lost in my own obsession of arriving at the ferry terminal tomorrow for good or bad.
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    My visor helmet was full of mosquitos and it was starting to be difficult to ride the darker it got. The new tires made it more difficult to pass 60 mph and I had a feeling this was going to affect also the fuel consumption from now on. The border was packed with cars queuing and like other times I skipped it completely, this time nobody seemed to care much. When I reached the first place this was the true definition of chaos. It was every man for himself. You first had to pass a visual inspection after which the officer would not tell you where to go next, but you had to have a guess and bet for one of the many queue lines to speak with another officer who will then tell you what to do next. Most of the people there were lorry drivers, so I tried to follow them. I was lucky and the officer in the first post gave me a paper for I guess the import of the motorcycle, then told me to go to another post to pay a fee and come back with a sealed paper. I was lucky here because the officer could have perfectly charged me for insurance but took his time to see that mine was valid in Azerbaijan and let me go quite faster than the rest. This was just a sneak peek for what waited ahead in Turkmenistan.
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    Then another visual inspection took place. It was quite funny because the officer let me open whichever bag I wanted from all of what I was carrying and he seemed to be satisfied quite fast with what I showed him. He only asked me if I carried a drone to what I said no. The next one was a bit rude as he took my passport and seemed to forget about giving it back. I had to be a bit assertive with him after a few minutes and he didn’t like it much throwing it at the floor. You could see they were stressed out of how many people were approaching at them simultaneously asking what to do next. What to do. I picked it up resigned and proceed to enter the country. But then one last time I was stopped by a guard who was only interested in the motorcycle and started to accelerate it until reaching the fuel cut point. Azerbaijanis I learnt, were petrol heads in the sense they would be doing all the time stupid shit like this… and they also had the best well-preserved Ladas ever.
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    Then I proceed to change some cash at the border and bargained a bit with the fixer. It was convenient because I didn’t even have to get off the motorcycle, but I learned later he had ripped me off not because of the exchange rate which I knew before negotiating with him but because there were some Turkish Liras (worth less) in the massive pile of bills I received back from 40 USD. When I counted everything seemed to be ok but not knowing how each bill is supposed to look had me. It was now already dark about 10PM, and I still had one hour and a half to get to Ganja. Once again I would have to ride at night although after being with Simon it no longer felt so intimidating. I asked the guys at a petrol station if I could use their phone to call the place, I was supposed to be sleeping that night. They were kind enough not only about letting me call but also act as interpreters as I typed in an offline Russian translator what I wanted to tell the host. They told me it was ok, that she was waiting for me no matter how late I would be arriving.
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    So, after filling up the deposit at one of the cheapest rates so far in this trip, I locked myself on the destination and went there on one go. Now, absolutely all cars drove with the high beams as this was the norm. I arrived slightly after midnight to a private house and the host, Sisi, opened the door and let me park the motorcycle inside. I tried to tell her with the Russian translator, sorry for arriving so late and bother her. She also used the same translator and far from being bothered she welcomed me and gave me some food for dinner. The hospitality here was just incredible. We were both tired so after a bit of chit chat we went to sleep.

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  14. DavidM1

    DavidM1 Unicorn hunting

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    Yes, that's something I've encountered. I'll never let a stranger rev my bike again.
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  15. guerreronegro

    guerreronegro Adventurer

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    I woke up next day a bit disoriented, yesterday was a tough one and sleeping every day in a different place was confusing me some days a lot. I didn’t recognize the place well but after a couple minutes I came back to myself. The house I had slept in was humble, it was composed of the main house and then the bathroom was isolated in the main patio. I soon discovered why. This was the point of my trip in which toilets would turn to be a hole in the ground. No big deal. I was used to these when I was in China and this was definitely not one of the worst ones. Sissy, the host also had a tiny farm inside with some chickens. She was quite pleasant, talkative and curious about my trip. We had to use all the time the Russian translator to communicate though. I thought that Azerbaijanis spoke their own language, a variation of Turkish from what I heard, but she seemed to prefer to use Russian to communicate with me and ask all kind of questions related to my trip.

    From her point of view, I should be married and with a family by now instead of traveling. The funniest thing of the morning is that she took this statement quite serious and started to message a friend of her who was single so to give her my number. I was told this could happen so I tried to laugh at it, if I stayed one day longer for sure she would have arranged something. Sissy then gave me some breakfast as I was writing my diaries. She would then ask me if I came through Armenia giving me disapproving signs about this country. I could see the tension was still there between these two countries.

    I had plenty of time today to arrive to Alat. For a few years now the ferry does not depart from Baku anymore so I my plan was to head there directly. My contact was telling me that the ferry for tomorrow was still 95% on for tomorrow so I could spend some time seeing something on the way. I asked Sissy for a recommendation to make the most out of my day and she told me to go to the Noigol National Park. She said it was the kind of place she would go to disconnect. It wasn’t far away and since it didn’t deviate much from the main road, I decided to give it a try. I didn’t change the spark plugs yesterday so I spent five times lubing the chain and changing the two spark plugs before continuing. The old ones were in good shape, so I decided to keep them for an emergency. After this I took a quick shower and prepared everything to keep riding one more day. Before leaving, I asked Sissy for a picture as a souvenir, but she said she was married and that taking pictures with other single men was prohibited. I apologized, she said she understood it and gave me a hug instead.

    The road leading to this place was very twisty but in good condition making the ride quite enjoyable. I stopped in what seemed to be a restaurant at the top of a hill and tested the new tires going through a rocky path. The grip was perfect, but the power going up the hill wasn’t. Then I remembered I was carrying another sprocket with a few teeth less so as soon as I had some time, I would swap that into place. The roads from now on didn’t seem to allow going faster than 50 mph so it made sense to have a bit more torque. The restaurant had a beautiful panoramic shot of the mountains up ahead and the crops which resembled a bit from the ones back home. I asked for a “lule kebab” and this would translate in two salads, loads of bread (the best bread so far), cheese, tomatoes and the kebab. IMG_20190803_143404.jpg
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    With a full stomach I continued the way on this mountain road until I had to cross a military check point. I paid a couple of Manats and continued through a gravel track until I reached the top. The place was filled with tourists, all of them seemed to be locals. There were a lot of curious people approaching to check the motorcycle and asking me directly how much it costed. I tried to tell them this is a very basic motorcycle in Europe but of course in their eyes this looked like a lie. The Varadero does not look like a small bike like the ones they are used to. After this question the next one it would be again, are you married? You just had to laugh at it, these direct questions are so rude back home, but they seemed to be dead serious about it. And of course, let’s not forget about Spain and football, this one was a must. Cultures.
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    I didn’t know exactly where to leave the bike but then a policeman approached me and signaled me a place where it would be safe, next to his post. He also allowed me to leave the helmet and other valuables inside. I was not sure at first whether I should believe him, but I decided to get rid of all prejudices and decide to trust the guy. He looked sincere and honest, and the place was big enough to allow me to stretch my legs for the rest of the morning, so better to walk without extra weight.
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    I didn’t realize then, but this place was kind of close to the border with Armenia and since this is a hot border the military presence was justified. If it was like this here, I didn’t want to imagine what it would be getting close to the controversial region of Nagorno-Karabakh. My friend from Armenia had told me a bit about this geopolitical conflict so I knew this topic was better to be avoided while in Azerbaijan. This place was definitely not used to foreign tourists. All people stared at me as I walked around the lake and would even take pictures with me. I met this way Rashad who spoke good English and confirmed my thoughts. I explained him a bit about my travel and he wished me good luck. We took a picture together and then I finished the short version of the hike around the lake. It felt quite good to be doing something different for once and the day was splendid with beautiful nature.
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    Then I received a message from the ferry guy confirming a ferry for tomorrow in the morning. So, I came back to the motorcycle and gave the police officer a tip for taking care of the motorcycle. The rest of the day was a bit boring except for the mountain road I had to ride back to get to the main road. The M2 road crosses the whole country from west to east and it is a long straight line. I kind of wanted to arrive to Alat early to make sure everything was sorted for tomorrow morning. I headed there non-stop stopping just for fuel and making some more friends on the way every time I stopped. Petrol was ridiculously cheap; I was filling the deposit for roughly 5 EUR to the change.
  16. gtowndualsport

    gtowndualsport Been here awhile

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    What a great ride report. I have thoroughly enjoyed reading about your exploits. I, too, am a fan of riding smaller bikes. It always seems to me that you have the most fun riding the smallest bike possible for the trip. In my experience, riding solo seems to make people more at ease with approaching you and offering help. I'm really interested in how your trip works out.
  17. SOLOKLR

    SOLOKLR Back to work

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    Did you at least check out the available ladies???
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  18. RedDogAlberta

    RedDogAlberta High Plains Drifter

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    I recently bought a Grom so I'm all gaga about small bikes. I love what you're doing.
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  19. guerreronegro

    guerreronegro Adventurer

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    Christmas Island
    At around 7 PM I arrived in Alat; a very tiny village compared to what I had in mind. On the way I already lost count on how many radars flashed at me. I think these were programmed at 50 kph in 120kph areas. I was not stopped and most likely I will never be notified so everything was good. Apparently, an English team posted a letter sent by the Azerbaijan authorities claiming full amount of the speeding violations 5 months after arriving home.

    My idea was to camp initially somewhere in the periphery close to some oil fields, but it was too windy. I stopped at a local restaurant to see if I could find either Internet or information on where to spend the night or how to buy the tickets. A group of friends were seated there and as soon as they saw me getting off the bike, they invited me. I thought I could join them for a drink and perhaps ask them how to proceed. This would prove to be one of the best memories of the trip. A couple of them spoke a bit of English and we soon were friends. Two of them were oil engineers working in Russia and on their holidays, another was a firefighter and the rest I cannot remember as I didn´t write it down.
    IMG_20190803_220308.jpg
    Without hesitation, they asked the owner to give me some food and drink. “This is on us” they told me. So, we had dinner together, it was a funny situation and the guys were incredibly welcoming letting me use their Internet and why not. At some point I asked them what the deal with the ferry was. They told me not to pay attention to the guy I was talking with as he was a fixer and he probably wanted to charge me an extra. Ceyhan, the firefighter called a friend of his, working at the port and he confirmed there was one for tomorrow in the morning. All you have to do is be there first thing in the morning to buy the tickets when they open the office. Feeling relieved I was not in a rush anymore. I asked also for a place to sleep and the guys seemed to also know the staff at Hotel Alat, which happened to be 100 metres from the port itself.
    IMG_20190803_231416.jpg
    After dinner, they asked me if I wanted to join them in the pub. Feeling curious about what an Azerbaijani pub would look like I jumped in. I followed their car and after five minutes we arrived. The layout was U shaped sofas with a low table in between. There was no alcohol, but the guys ordered a substitute of beer which was not bad. Funny enough, smoking weed when we were in the other place seemed to be OK. These guys made me feel like one more and we empathized the more we spoke. It was all very spontaneous but felt also genuine at the same time. I would be leaving tomorrow and probably not seem them again. Nevertheless, we exchanged numbers and we kept contact throughout the trip. At one point, we build enough trust and I went ahead and ask them how the situation with Armenia was. I am intrigued by politics and this conflict being a long one had me thinking for a while.
    IMG_20190803_235923.jpg
    The guys took out their mobile phones and in a few seconds they showed me a this video telling me, “this is what is wrong”, “we don´t forget”. The Khojaly Genocide or massacre was something I never heard about and the photos and videos shown were extremely shocking. The vacuum in the balance of power left after the arbitrary distribution of land by the USSR and its subsequent disintegration was the most likely reason I thought. I didn´t ask anything else for the remaining night and enjoyed the evening with the guys. After the pub, the guys escorted me to the hotel. The place was new and there was no road nor illumination. I wouldn´t have been able to find it by myself. Once there, we said goodbye. I was grateful for their hospitality. If there is any problem with the ferry tomorrow call us, Ceyhan told me as they headed back to the car. There were three Mongol Rally cars parked in the closed complex which was always a good signal. The room was cheap and had normal toilets and hot water so I couldn´t ask for more. Only a few mosquitoes disturbed me a bit but I used the repellent and soon they went to sleep with me.

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  20. guerreronegro

    guerreronegro Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2020
    Oddometer:
    55
    Location:
    Christmas Island
    Having done that I would be posting next the wedding ritual :D:D

    I liked the bike on the way in but coming back through Siberia I kind of missed having something a bit more powerful. The thing is that the bike came back in perfect shape and I still use it as a daily commuter. And yeah, I learnt a good lesson in this trip by going alone. It´s either ride with someone you really get along with or solo.
    9w6vx and SOLOKLR like this.