Actually NOT a piece of shit!

Discussion in 'Dakar champion (950/990)' started by Anthony, Jun 5, 2004.

  1. Anthony

    Anthony Hurry up, Stephie!

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    see http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=43277 for original thread...

    So, Peebee was right. The guy who was working on my bike screwed up. Apparently he reattached one of the carbs w/ the hose clamp upside down and/or too tight and caused the rubber boot that connects the carb to the intake to tear and leak air. My NEW mechanic was very pleased to be able to find and solve this problem, as was I that he did. He also commented several times on the beauty, simplicity and outstanding function of the 950, as this was the first opportunity he had had to work on one. He is also now jealous, as he likes my bike better than his own R1100GS.:wink:

    I am very sorry if I hurt anyone's feelings with my original comments about the 950 being a POS. As you can imagine, my frustration level was very high, and being the non-motorcycle mechanic that I am, I took it out on the bike.

    Have a great day! I will now that my bike is FIXED!!


    Anthony
    #1
  2. AZcacti

    AZcacti Dope on a Rope

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    Glad to see you got everything sorted out :D .
    #2
  3. motozilla

    motozilla Long timer

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    Tony,

    I was screaming, cursing and calling it a hunk of crap too when I couldn't get it to run right but now that it's sorted I'm loving it. We'll have to hook up ofr a ride sometime.

    Paul
    #3
  4. Renazco

    Renazco Formerly AKA Boejangles

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    Glad you came to your senses :bash
    #4
  5. PeeBee

    PeeBee Giant leap for me!

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    Glad your issue is fixed. This should make your confidence in the bike rise again. Have fun, PeeBee
    #5
  6. spagthorpe

    spagthorpe Long timer

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    Two out of three I guess. Everything I've read so far seems to indicate that the 950 is anything but simple.
    #6
  7. Anthony

    Anthony Hurry up, Stephie!

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    I've heard that too, but I like that my mechanic seems to think its simple. He is comparing it to Japanese bikes where everything is impossible to get to, I think.
    #7
  8. Stephen

    Stephen Long timer Supporter

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    Okay, sorta, yeah.

    The 950 certainly has quite a few parts. Lots of parts, especially in and around the engine. Nevertheless, everything has been done really nicely--compare, for example, the 950 centerstand mounting and the airhead BMW mounting. The KTM has maybe a three more parts, but it's much easier to install. The engineering is brilliant. You don't have to fight springs, or remove the exhaust, and the bushings and pins are much more robust. Yet the airhead has a reputation for simplicity.

    My point is, there are simple objects--things with few parts--and there are objects that are simple to deal with, regardless of the number of parts. So there are different ways to be "simple".

    And different ways to be complex; the classic reductionionist view counts parts, while the systems analyst counts connections between subsystems. BMW, with both airheads and oilheads, approaches manufacturability and modularity very differently from KTM. BMW likes to make a single part serve many functions, embedding the complexity in the design and fab stage, yielding a single part instead of many. KTM is not so rigorous about this, though the rear fender of the 950 takes the principle to a new extreme, serving as fender, toolbox, and wiring guide. But on the handlebars, KTM is traditional dirtbike, with clutch and switchgear separate assembies; similarly, the throttle and brake are not integrated. I have found the KTM to be easier--not quicker, not fewer parts, but nevertheless, easier--to work ont than the Beemers. Not so much less complex, but complex in a way that is easier to deal with, perhaps because they set their subsystem boundaries up differently, perhaps because they have fewer connections across subsystems, perhaps just because they do it more the way I'd have done it.
    #8
  9. spagthorpe

    spagthorpe Long timer

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    I guess by simple, I usually think about owner-servicable, or at least with basic tools. I don't know, I can appreciate the beauty of the design of the 950, believe me. I have serious bike lust for the thing, and if it wasn't for the fact that I don't like being tied to a dealer's service department. The cost and complexity of the servicing is the thing that scares me off. Maybe scares is strong, but I like things a little simpler.
    #9
  10. Anthony

    Anthony Hurry up, Stephie!

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    I like my bike now. I have by no means come to my senses! I kinda resent the implication...:loco

    Anthony
    #10
  11. gorgopodaros

    gorgopodaros Been here awhile

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    Nice to hear that all is OK
    Enjoy your rides, mate :freaky
    #11