Adventure 1st Aid

Discussion in 'New Zealand' started by Night Falcon, Nov 5, 2020.

?

Who Carries a 1st Aid Kit

  1. Yes - I care

    11 vote(s)
    91.7%
  2. Nope - Someone else will have something

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. Yes - but ACC should provide free kits with our Rego!

    1 vote(s)
    8.3%
  1. Night Falcon

    Night Falcon Structural Failure

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    I've been looking at getting a decent 1st Aid kit to carry with me on the Tiger for a while, you never know right? I've done several 1st Aid training courses as part of my construction background but am no medic, still, I'd rather have something to offer some help with more than the 3 or 4 band aides that currently make up my emergency kit.

    So I found this kit on Trade Me from a Kiwi company for $49.00 delivered. It will fit nicely under my seat and seems to cover most of the bases. The contents quality seems pretty good in spite of the Chinese notepad :D

    Anywho...I thought I'd post this thread to encourage y'all to carry some 1st Aid....... for those you ride with at least.

    Ride safe

    Each Kiwiz kit contains:
    Heavy Duty WATERPROOF Bag with internal pockets 240x180x75mm
    Instant icepack
    Digital thermometer,
    4 x 15ml eyewash/saline solution Eye wash bath
    1 Emergency blanket
    1 Eye Pad 5.5x7.5cm
    1 Burns Dressing 20x30cm
    1 Conforming Bandage Roll 6cmx4m
    1 Conforming Bandage Roll 8cmx4m
    1 Combined Pad(abdominal)12.5x23cm
    4 Non Adherent Pads 5x7.5cm
    1 Crepe Bandage 5cmx4m
    1 Crepe Bandage 10cmx4m
    1 Metal Scissors 15cm
    1 Metal Tweezers 8.5cm
    4 Safety Gloves large
    10 Safety Pins
    20 Band Aid Strips
    1 Band Aid roll 7.6cmx1m
    4 Sterile Gauze Swabs
    1 Triangular Bandage 9x9x127cm
    2 Adhesive Tape Roll 13mmx5m Multi-pore
    2 Adhesive Plasters 7.7x4.5cm
    2 Adhesive Plasters 7.5x3.7cm
    2 Semi-Permeable Dressings 6x7cm
    2 Adhesive Island Dressings 6x10cm
    2 Plastic disposal bags
    4 Soap Wipes
    4 Saline Cleansing Wipes
    1 First Aid Guide Sheet
    1 Notebook
    1 Contents Usage register
    IMG_2822.JPG IMG_2823.JPG
    #1
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  2. Box'a'bits

    Box'a'bits In need of repair Supporter

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    Chuck it into a mini roll bag to waterproof it.
    #2
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  3. EVLED

    EVLED Bike riding nutter!

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    I've got a pretty basic one most of the time. What I really should do is get some training...I am reasonable at dialing 111.

    Your one looks a bit better stocked than mine.
    #3
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  4. oldbeer

    oldbeer Grandadventurer

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    Good reminder Marty

    I usually have one on any long rides. Got used to taking one with me when working overseas and has become a habit.

    Mine probably still has too many bunger-upper pills in it now:-)

    Another good idea is to stow it somewhere readily accessible and mark your luggage accordingly. You might not be the one trying to find it.
    #4
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  5. glitch_oz

    glitch_oz Long timer

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    Kudos onya!

    It's a hard call though how much gear is needed versus how much stuff to drag around and occasionally update, size/ weight of the pack, potential small versus bigger group requirements etc.

    Working in the medical/ provider field plus running/ leading group rides for the last 30 years, I firmly believe 1.aid training to be a duty.... riding bikes in groups add accident scene management to that, anything from traffic management to keeping everyone/myself safe during providing (or even receiving, if conscious) 1.aid etc..... it's a wide range.

    From long experience, training is worth more than kit-size!
    I must admit to ALWAYS carrying a rather big 1.aid kit, from day-rides with mates to our small-group overseas ADV-rides in Europe/ US/NZ etc.
    It's grown over the years and includes a kit like shown above, plus a multitude of extras like non-drowsy anti-histamines, modular fracture-bracing, basic and prescription pain-killers/ injector pens and anti-inflammatories, at least one older EPI-pen from own supplies (maybe out of date but still works to some degree, fresh supplies for o/s or longer group trips), anti-squirt tabs, squirt tabs, broad-spectrum antibiotics.
    Some of those are a hotchpotch-collection of personal/ friends'/ overseas-legit etc meds acquired along the way and updated as the chance arises, all of which have proven their worth over the years. Needless to state that one HAS to know when + where to use all the stuff, contra-indications etc.

    The MAIN item really is training!

    And more training.

    And try to stay cool when the heat is on....

    It all turns to shit when your trip/ riding mate dies right under your hands in the long grass at the side of the road
    CPR-staying-alive-rythm be fugged!


    Tks for bringing this up...
    #5
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  6. enduro0627

    enduro0627 Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Hi, great topic. For me it is, just like a toolkit, coming down to what is most likely going to happen. You can't be prepared for everything.
    All depends on the ride you are doing. In NZ the below worked for me.
    - protect yourself - latex gloves
    - clean - cleaning wipes
    - disinfect - iodine wipes
    - stop bleeding - gauze roll, pads, strap, belt or rope
    - cover - bandage
    - pain management - Panadol, Nurofen, etc
    Anything more serious you can't do much unless you are a doctor or got EMT training.
    Get help as quick as you can. Emergency satellite communication, PLB, mobile phone.
    I do find CPR overrated. Studies are showing only 5% of CPR successful. Even in this 5%, a large number of the patients will live the life of a cabbage, because the brain got no or not enough oxygen for way too long.
    One more important thing. Do check for medical bracelet, medical tag, ICE card for health/medical info.
    I have a tag on a neck chain with personal, medical and DNR info.
    #6
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  7. innathyzit

    innathyzit AKA Woodman

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    Dec 30, 2008
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    I carry a tiny kit in my jacket pocket, but it is only good for minor non life threatening scrapes. Can't see it being a lifesaver. If I needed to stop major bleeding, a shirt would work better than the tiny bandages in a small first aid kit.
    Like Glitchoz says, "training".
    #7
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  8. Night Falcon

    Night Falcon Structural Failure

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    Interesting thoughts chaps :D

    Knowing what the tools are and how to use them is obviously important - essential - and you won't have the right stuff when things go south according to Murphy. For myself I've had lots of training, been on the receiving end more times than you should and have been racked with guilt - racked I tell ya - at my lackadaisical first aid kit. I'm now the happiest I could be with my new flash kit :happay

    I'm now off for a ride to do silly stuff at the beach - what could go wrong - but if it does I hope the tide isn't too far in :lol3
    #8
  9. enduro0627

    enduro0627 Been here awhile

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    Loosely connected:
    #9
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  10. neppi

    neppi Long timer

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    I have something similar in my tank-bag (than the OP’s kit). Earlier this week I had to fish the bag from a ditch before I could start patching up myself. Broken ankle made it trickier...

    I always planned to have an essentials kit on my person, but never got my head around it. Now I have all the time in the world, a reason and first hand experience, to put the pocket-kit together.

    But, like said, training, training, training! Any first-aid training will do, get some, but atleast the Ride Forever guys do biker-oriented first-aid courses.

    Cheers!
    #10
  11. bikemoto

    bikemoto Tyre critic

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    These days I carry the mandated essentials for adventure/trail running/remote mtb races. A small kit that includes a triangular bandage and emergency blanket. I figure if it is more convenient it will get carried more often. It's stashed in a small dry bag with a multitool and not a lot else. Antihistamines, paracetamol and anti-inflammatories get added. It goes in my hydration pack whenever I'm out mtbing as well (in fact it tends to live there).

    And that reminds me I need a first aid course refresher, with the remote areas add-on. In my experience most trainers will bias their teaching to your environment on request.

    PLB is perhaps the next thing on the list.
    #11
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  12. neppi

    neppi Long timer

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  13. Night Falcon

    Night Falcon Structural Failure

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    Great ride, practicing power slides, hard braking, deep sand maneuvers etc.... despite appearances didn't need to break out the kit :lol3

    IMG_2829.JPG
    #13
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  14. dazzadm

    dazzadm Long timer

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    I also carry a basic first aid kit on the bike. It is in the glove box in the tank all the time. But I also put in my other dry bag on longer trips which contains extra bits that I have put together from adventure racing and tramping.

    I hope not to have to use it. But have had to attend accidents as a first responder. Being an electrician, 1st aid training is just part of the job. But have also had PHEC training as part of our company Emergency Response Team.

    Hope not to have to attend you guys, but always prepared if we have to:thumb
    #14
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  15. enduro0627

    enduro0627 Been here awhile

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    Thanks to this thread, I went over my kit to see if anything need to be replaced or refilled. Went to hunt for a couple of items.
    Long story short. If you are looking for a 1st aid kit, check out the "chemist warehouse".
    This one (see pics) is $14.99. The bag is enough big to customize it with your extra items. 20201108_135721.jpg 20201108_135752.jpg
    #15
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