Adventure Spec Trail Riding Gear: very interesting development

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by dragos, Jan 6, 2017.

  1. dragos

    dragos Master of disaster.

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    I'm following this with GREAT interest. Should be the logical next step from my current Companero setup:

    http://adventure-spec.com/tracks/layer-up/



    15138509_1156013987769497_6645985165764434155_o.jpg
    (photos from Adventure-Spec's FB page).
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    15235456_1122020451180364_8027560134362519824_o.jpg
    #1
  2. TBR

    TBR One Life ~ Live It...

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    Lets hope as quality looking gear, ADVspec might team up with a clothing manufacturer again and make the gear available to the general public.
    Wasn't ADVspec the driving force behind the development of the Klim ADV Rally kit some years ago and LP of R2R fame had the first ever blue set (Klim ADV Rally) for his first Dakar rally?
    #2
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  3. dragos

    dragos Master of disaster.

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    As I understand, they'll most likely offer it under their own brand this time.
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  4. shrederscott

    shrederscott Long timer

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    Hi

    As soon as I read the base wicking layer was not merino wool I knew they were on they were on the wrong track for me and my needs.

    Scott
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  5. dragos

    dragos Master of disaster.

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    I'm a fan of merino as well, but it's not clear for me what importance does that have? I guess it'll be available in a modular way, and one would use whatever base layer.
    Also, I've found synthetic base layers that I liked. The fact that's not merino doesn't mean it's automatically bad.
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  6. shrederscott

    shrederscott Long timer

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    Hi

    IMO gear that designed for competition does not often work well outside of that environment.

    By example

    I used to ski race...skin tight fitting speed suits were absolutely required to be competitive due their aerodynamic properties. .... but ....they are very cold....all racers had 2 sets of warm outer wear...one they keep on till the last second at the start....and one waiting at the bottom...to put on...so you did not freeze to death.....speed suits great for racing totally unworthy for recreational skiing

    Unlike the Dakar guys who can wash or change out there base layers everyday....I got to live in mine for days on end and I do not like smelling like rotten sewage by the second day...bottom line for me

    Merino = no funky smell

    Synthetic = funky smell.= high yuck factor = I am not using it.

    That suit works for the Dakar racer and his VERY special needs....would not meet my needs as a recreational adventure ride.

    Scott
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  7. dragos

    dragos Master of disaster.

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    Well, that's not true (and again, I'm a merino fan myself). Lyndon is competing in Malle Moto class, the amount of gear (and the facilities for him) are more limited than with factory or super production competitors.
    It's actually mentioned in the article that the layers would be treated against smell.
    But again, why would that matter. I'm interested mainly in the shell, if I'd get this suit I'd use my merino base layers anyways.
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  8. shrederscott

    shrederscott Long timer

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    Hi

    OK ....look they sleep in hotels and get showers every night....I do not.

    But beside that ....there gear is designed for speed.....having to stop and add or remove a layer takes to much time compared to opening or closing a zipper vent.

    I run hot....I experience similar extremes in weather in my riding.

    For me tough mesh jacket and pants with excellent abrasion protection is a must.....then a light compact weather protective outer layer with an extra merino inner layer can be added as needed.....The time to put this on and off is no big deal for me as I am not in a time rush.

    That race setup would be way to hot for me.....

    But ...it may work for you....different strokes for different folks

    Oh and his gear only needs to last for that one race...that treatment for smell...will washout quickly ...and then become smelly. ...I need more longevity out of my gear

    Like I said race gear works great in race conditions. ...that does not mean it will work well in recreational conditions.....sometimes it does....often it does not.

    Scott
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  9. dragos

    dragos Master of disaster.

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    They don't.
    I don't exactly get your point. This is exactly how their system works.
    #9
  10. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams Supporter

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    This type of "system" is getting to be more and more popular. Its basically the same idea as any other highly ventilated suit, with an outer rain layer. The companero is different since it integrates into one really well, but you're stuck with the extremely well made clunky outers while not using them. Knox is pushing something similar with one of their pressure suits in the Layering system.

    My biggest issue with all of this is having to carry the extra layer around. Still, its what I use because a full laminated suit doesn't work for me either. The best solution I've found, which still sucks in another way, is a regular jacket that can be almost waterproof, yet vent extremely well, that then relies on a tiny packing liner for 100% waterproofing. My Spidi jacket wouldn't vent as well if it was fully waterproof but it does great for 30min or so. Its a fair compromise for me. I look forward to finding that one do it all suit, but I just think there are way too many compromises for it to ever happen. If anyone knows of a super lightweight, fully waterproof, highly ventilated suit, with the best armor that works across all temperature changes, that would also protect one in a crash, I'd like to know about it. To my knowledge this doesn't exist. All the compromises negate the pro's.
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  11. dragos

    dragos Master of disaster.

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    Well, they say the external waterproof shell packs small in this case (which makes sense on a rally bike) and fits in the lower back pocket.
    And the pants are "almost waterproof".
    #11
  12. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams Supporter

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    Don't get me wrong. It looks ok, but in the end, its just a mesh jacket with a waterproof layer. You're still adding, what, a pressure suit? No mention of armor other than the knee guards. Maybe, its the best versions of both, but I don't see the difference between mixing and matching what you already might own. that is where the Companero is a huge step ahead. it actually integrates and becomes one piece. It's genius. Problem is you're carrying the equivalent of a complete extra suit, which is silly. I guess if you use all the huge boxes and have plenty of storage space that might work??
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  13. shrederscott

    shrederscott Long timer

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    Right...my bad no hotels...team red Bull KTM has a motor home with showers and beds....same difference.

    Again race gear is designed for speed and the specific needs of that race.

    Baja race bikes do not have that heavy front fairing like dakar race bikes...because they do not need a place for all the dakar required navigation and tracking gear.

    But if your after the dakar look ...then thats what you want on your bike.....me I prefer the more minimal Baja race type setup for my riding needs saves weight and I can still mount my needed navigation equipment without issue.

    The dakar is a bad ass race for sure...but the needs of a dakar racer have only limited overlap with my needs....hence ...not a lot of there gear would work well for me....as I said race gear works great for the race world...sometimes it works great in the recreational world too...but often it does not.

    Scott
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  14. dragos

    dragos Master of disaster.

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    Of course, but in these cases the details of the execution matter.
    BTW, it doesn't have knee guards, it's cut so it can accommodate knee braces. So this one, by cut and by features, it's (at least at this stage) pretty much a rally setup (not "adventure").
    True, my Companero might already do almost all that (it wouldn't fit knee braces, but then I don't have those) while also being a better "touring" suit for when doing long tarmac trips.
    On the other hand, each time I go offroad I use my Companero in a similar config (all armor out, pressure suit + knee guards), so something that's dedicated to this approach looks very interesting to me.
    I'm also interested to hear more about the materials, that is how they compare with typical Cordura etc.
    #14
  15. Barakaiki

    Barakaiki Been here awhile

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    This is the trend. More and more are ditching the integrated armor and making tough shells allowing the end user to wear their pressure suit of choice. I think Mosko is developing something along this line. Interesting trend.


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  16. dragos

    dragos Master of disaster.

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    Well, we two will have this exchange forever I guess :beer
    Yes, I agree carrying an oversuit is inconvenient. But, for me, by far not as inconvenient as pushing my bike stuck in the mud, in 40°C, while wearing a ProShell jacket.
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  17. shrederscott

    shrederscott Long timer

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    Hi

    I agree this the way to go.

    I think we need to think about 3 different protective needs impact, abrasion, and weather, and that each ideally should be a separate stand alone layer.

    Having a tight fitting inner layer with quailty soft pads (think focefield ) for protection works well as the pads move well with rider and stay in place in a crash, and allow good freedom of movement of the next layer....hard plastic armor gets hung up and does allow the next layer to move well IMO

    Put a good highly breathable abrasion protective layer over that. For me that is a klim mesh jacket and pant.

    Then add a light weather layer as needed works well for a lot of riding conditions. For me that is the marmot precip jacket and full side zip pant.

    And is the system I use.

    I use bohn tights with forcefield armor for my lower body under my klim mesh mojave pants under my light compact rain/weather layer. Marmot precip pants with full side zips......zips can be open for venting

    Up top

    I wear my merino tee shirt...then forcefield chest rib protector...then klim mesh induction jacket with replacement forcefield pads...then my very light and compact marmot precip rain/weather jacket with nice pit zips for venting as needed.....induction jacket tight fitting like a pressure suit so built in pads work well in that combo impact/abrasion protective jacket.

    This setup meets my needs of riding in Colorado and Utah were I go from hot lower elevation and or hot technical dirt to cold or cool high elevation technical dirt or slab..back and forth in a single day.

    Works well for me on multi day trips and day trips that are pure dirt.

    Works for me...maybe not for you...and probably not for a Dakar racer as it likly takes to long to add and remove my weather layer for them

    I must add... one of the weakness of this system is the outer weather layer is kinda fragile....it would be destroyed in a off on the slab...and could be damaged in a off in the dirt....BUT....it is fairly inexpensive to replace...and could likely be field repaired with duck tape.


    Scott
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  18. Barakaiki

    Barakaiki Been here awhile

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    Sweet setup. Yeah, I have the Badlands for situations where it makes sense to go one stop shopping (extended single climate BDR's). But increasingly I use my Forcefield EK harness with a base wicking layer, and then depending on weather, a jersey or a shell. Forcefield makes damn good stuff.


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    #18
  19. dmason

    dmason goofball

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  20. Bayner

    Bayner Long timer

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