Adventure Sportster Build AKA Piglet

Discussion in 'Some Assembly Required' started by Austin hayes, May 28, 2016.

  1. Austin hayes

    Austin hayes Been here awhile

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    Did that swingarm hold up? I saw some flux core welds on it that made me nervous haha. Shes not a pavement princess show bike, she will be jumped and abused. And overloaded with camping gear
    #61
  2. Ginger Beard

    Ginger Beard Instagram @oneworldcycles

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    Glad to see your bike is working out! :freaky
    #62
  3. mach1mustang351

    mach1mustang351 Long timer Supporter

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    I'm sure the swingarm is fine structurally. The cut joints were all sleeved and fluxcore wire was used in conjunction with shielding gas to create a dual shield system for more penetration. The bracing system is also welded to the extended part of the swing arm for a little more support, and it looks cool.

    Maybe you know something I don't, but I think the build process and outcome was sound on the build.

    Sorry about defending my design I. Your thread here. It's your build and you can do as you wish. I cant wait to see how it turns out.
    #63
  4. Austin hayes

    Austin hayes Been here awhile

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    Didn't mean to sound like i was trash talking your bike. I have respect for anyone who builds a custom bike, just curious if you have had any problems with it so i can avoid those issues
    #64
  5. mach1mustang351

    mach1mustang351 Long timer Supporter

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    No offense taken. I have had many haters look at the bike in the past, I get a little defensive. It's like talking trash about my child :lol3

    I learned a few lessons in the process that would make me a little more efficient if I were to build another swing arm. Unfortunately, the bike hasn't been long term tested as it was built for a competition and put up for sale. We haven't had a buyer so there is sits. Me and the rest of the build team have ridden it enough miles to be comfortable with it.

    The bike is running a 6" extended swingarm. It is using the XB12X suspension front and rear. So it has the inverted forks in the front. It also has a 21" front and 18" rear. Our bike is very quick handling and easy to steer. I was a bit worried about it being slow steering with the long wheel base. I has it up to about 80 on a curvy section of road and was confident in the stance and setup.

    I don't remember off hand how much longer the front forks are compared to a stock sportster, I can get you those measurements if you'd like. The you can get an idea about rake, trail etc. I'm sure you're versed in all this given how far you've come with your sporty. If this would help, let me know and I can get you some exact specs.

    To me, the idea of building custom is the compromises can stop. You get to do exactly what you want and set it up how you want. I wanted to challenge myself to build the extended swingarm. I consulted my engineer friend about my build process and it is over built because of the weight of the sportster. The bike is definitely heavier than.... just about anything normally off roaded, so durability was key.

    I would like the idea of the aluminum swingarm as it would take a fair amount of weight off the bike. The swingarm I built with the new monoshock mount, extended section and bracing became very heavy.

    There is no wrong answer among the options you have presented. Personally, If I had to do it again I would probably run a less extended setup with a dual shock. The only reason being, I like the more classic look of the dual shock and for my uses, I would want more of a gravel road, power line trail, atv trail bike, more like a flat tracker, rather than a long travel off roader. Your usage is much different.

    Like I said, If you want more info on our bike I am more than happy to give you what we have.

    Keep the updates coming.
    #65
  6. boatpuller

    boatpuller Long timer

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    Even if Austin Hayes does not want your information, I very much would like it, assuming your offer to him is extended to me. I'll PM you contact info.
    #66
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  7. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    I'm impressed and inspired by your Sportster. I am now in the market for a Sportster to Scramblerize this winter. I am sure I will be stealing many of your ideas! :thumb
    #67
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  8. Kiba

    Kiba Dances With Huskies

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    Good luck. :thumb

    Not sure how much they run in your area, but down here a slightly ratty, decent running pre-rubbermount evo (86-03 generation) can be had from 2k-2.5k. 1.5k if you're really lucky. A nice thing is, many of the parts we would want as potential off-road riders (like mid controls) are less valuable than cruiser-style parts (like forwards) on Sportsters, so you can often find a more motivated seller and/or a better deal on what you'll probably want as a platform.

    They're fun as hell to ride once the weight gets lower and the suspension gets higher.

    I haven't built mine yet (it's still basically the factory roadster) but have ridden a buddy's scrambler with tall shocks/etc. They're still pretty heavy compared to a purpose-built dual sport, but in a way they feel like an old big-bore thumper (XT, XR) on steroids. :lol3

    Definitely a boatload of fun. And it's nice to be able to find parts for them unlike many classic Japanese machines.
    #68
  9. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    Roughly the same prices here.

    Mine will be more of a street/dirt road scrambler, and I am short. So, mine will not require very tall suspension. It should be fun to do something different from what I am used to working on.
    #69
  10. Kiba

    Kiba Dances With Huskies

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    They are quirky compared to Japanese bikes, that's for sure. Some features are really nice (the gear driven cams, easy top end freshening, single side-mount carb for maintenance). Others are a PITA (primary chain adjustment, clutch replacement and adjustment).

    If you haven't ridden a Sporty before, the defining attributes are: Heavy, low center of gravity, surprisingly compact/small and very narrow. And woefully under-suspended from the factory.

    I share your height issue with tall bikes (I'm average height but have short legs). You can probably go up to about 14" on the rear without it being bad.
    #70
  11. Austin hayes

    Austin hayes Been here awhile

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    Jap bikes VS sportster the sportster wins maintenance hands down. Hydraulic lifters (No valve adjustments ever), primary chain adjustment takes 5 minutes, I've wired it myself (just headlight, taillight and ignition).
    Dealer support is unmatched in the USA. Air-cooled so no Radiator to bust

    Tractor like torque, almost impossible to stall. The weight is manageable if your not small, i'm a somewhat large guy so it doesn't bother me. It was significantly lighter feeling (lower) before i did the WP fork and 18"/21" wheel swap.
    #71
  12. Kiba

    Kiba Dances With Huskies

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    Oh I agree on maintenance, for sure. I love the tires-and-oil schedule. I put gas in mine, change the oil, then check tires and swap plugs when I feel like it. Besides that, there's nothing that needs doing. Between the air cooling (no radiator), gear driven cams (no tensioners), hydraulic lifters (no adjustment), understressed design (long rebuild intervals), side mounted fuel system (easy mods/maintenance), and pushrods (top end without resetting timing), it's probably one of the best low-maintenance old school designs ever.

    The wiring on 91-96 bikes is awesome too, the Deutsch connectors are the best, most moddable setup I've ever owned. Meant to be customized without breakage and entirely reversible to stock if and when you want.

    That said, the primary adjustment is just quirky if you're used to Japanese or Euro(?) machines.
    #72
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  13. Austin hayes

    Austin hayes Been here awhile

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    Started playing with making some rearsets. No promises that I won't scrap the idea and go back stock. I figure someone on here has done it before and better. So advice is welcome.

    Grabbed some aluminum plate, bronze bushings, and a spare dirt bike master I had laying around
    20160930_152051_HDR.jpg

    Basic idea is a piece of 1'' tubing bolted through the rear lower motor mount with a tab on top that will have another support bolt into frame. Will cut new levers out of aluminum plate and hopefully use the dirt bike master instead of the clunky stock unit.
    20160930_150837_HDR.jpg


    Having a spare frame for mockup is the coolest thing ever. Until you forget to account for clearance of everything.

    Tubing welded to angle for flat mount surface. Nuts will be welded inside tubing and lever will ride on bushing on a bolt that will thread Into it. Pegs will be welded to bolt head. 20160930_154839_HDR.jpg


    Basic shift linkage idea. Like I said, just mockup. Lots of problems and clearances to work out but I appreciate any input/better ideas.
    #73
  14. FR700

    FR700 Heckler ™©®℗

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    Those leverage ratios are gonna make for a loooooong gear lever throw.


    .
    #74
  15. Austin hayes

    Austin hayes Been here awhile

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    As long as the length from pivot to linkage pivot is the same it should be the same. However with my size 14 boot I plan on making it longer and adjustable to suit me a bit better
    #75
  16. Austin hayes

    Austin hayes Been here awhile

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    Ah. Looks like shortening the lever on the shaft will solve my problem and I can retain the rest of the design, where did you get the hiem joint linkage? Easy way is oil impregnated bronze bushings from the hardware store but hiem joints just look so good:super
    #76
  17. Austin hayes

    Austin hayes Been here awhile

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    Just stumbled across a picture I had to share..... 20150517_140547_HDR.jpg


    I forgot to mention when I split my belt on the shakedown run it packed the back side of my pulley with belt and destroyed my oil seal, bearing was fine, still running it with no issues.

    Notice melted plastic bits stuck to frame
    #77
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  18. Puglia10

    Puglia10 Been here awhile

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    i love this bike and the fact that its actually ridden. right on
    #78
  19. madrider5150

    madrider5150 Riding somewhere

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    So the second pic with the tubing welded on, does that take into account a lengthened kickstand, Im assuming yours must be. I cant tell from the pic if it will ride right under the footpeg or interfere.
    #79
  20. Austin hayes

    Austin hayes Been here awhile

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    My kickstand is snapped off at the moment from a incident at a gas station, but the rubber bumper is visible in the picture, and Below the footpeg, I don't forsee and issues with interference. Mocked up a shift lever and linkage, shifter throw is definitely longer than stock but not extreme. I'll wait until I ride it to decide if it needs adjustment
    #80