Adventure vs MX boots

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by bikeroz, Mar 1, 2017.

  1. LostInPA

    LostInPA Professional American

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    Hi,

    There is a new version of the Forma Terra out called the Terra EVO. It now includes a hinged feature called FCS (Flex Control System) which strengthens the ankle area to prevent side to side flex and give much better ankle support. They also beefed up the ankle cup and plastics reinforcement. It is waterproof as before.

    There is also the Predator 2.0 boot out now by Forma which is their premium MX boot. It is available in MX and a black Enduro version with tread sole.

    In regards to the Forma Terrain TX and Terrain TX Enduro models, I have it here and also a pair of Sidi Crossfire 2 TAs. They are both in size 46 Euro. I weighed them on my postal scale and they are: Forma Terrain 4 lbs, 5 oz. SIDI 4 lbs 7 oz. I also weighed my Toucans and in size 44 they are 3 lbs 5 oz. I expect most MX and adventure boots to be about in the same ballpark as these.

    The SIDI boots have more deluxe memory foam inside so from a creature comforts standpoint they are more plush, but in terms of protection I don't see much of any difference in the protective elements between them and I think the Forma Terrain TX boots are the best value full protection MX boot. They are not waterproof at all, but will be fine in puddle splash or a little rain. If you put your foot down into a puddle or stream, the MX boots are going to get wet inside.

    In terms of walking around, MX boots are not very good for it, which is preferable to me as I want a really stiff boot with a stiff sole for on bike protection. I am mostly 90% dirt / trail riding these days so it's the best boot for me. I am so used to MX boots now that I just wear them all the time no matter what I am riding, and they have the best protection.

    There's no free lunch, so a lighter boot that is easier to walk in will not be as protective as an MX boot, and an MX boot will not be the greatest to walk around in. I would suggest one possible compromise solution for an ADV rider would be an ADV boot like the Alpinestars Toucan, Corozal or the Form Terra boots. All of which are waterproof and OK to walk around in. It's basically like wearing an army boot in terms of feel. Or, you could wear MX boots and carry a pair of sport sandals or tennis shoes in a bag on your bike if you will be off the bike and walking quite a bit. I guess it depends on how much walking you will be doing.

    Guys I ride with do use ADV boots on the trails we go on and they work fine for them. I have some existing ankle injuries and I also wear knee braces so it's MX/Enduro boots for me.

    I was not unhappy with my Toucans but I know that I'm a crasher and in my crashes where I was wearing them, I would have been better off with MX boots in terms of injury protection. Now these were real crashes, not just dropping the bike on the trail or tipping over. For that kind of stuff I think an MX or ADV boot is going to be fine as long as the ankle flex area is really supported so you don't twist an ankle or hyperextend something if your bike lands on the ankle. But for a big crash I want my MX boots.

    I hope this was helpful. Here I have a video and about 1/3 of the way in I go over some of the new released Forma boot models for 2018. I am not a professional narrator but I eventually cover everything. :-)

    #41
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  2. GF-kam

    GF-kam Been here awhile

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    Hey LostInPA,

    Wow! Lots of great responses and recommendations to digest. Are you a reseller ? Sure sounds like you know your gear. Let me know.

    I did hear about the new version of the Forma Terra EVO with additional plastic ankle support. I already have the older version of the Forma Terra with waterproof liner. I love the boot. My everyday boot. I thought it would be all I need with my tame riding. At best gravel roads and fire roads. However, as I get more educated and planning a 10 day off road ride with full gear on my big bike, I am concerned about more protection. My Forma Terra in size 44 EU / 10 U.S. come in a little over 3 lb. / boot.

    I am concerned about Forma Predator 2.0 and other full MX like Gaerne SG-12. For a few long big bikes off-roads a year, I cannot justify cost and all the features. I just feel a bit overkill for my application. The only one I might consider would be SIDI Crossfire 2 TA; due to lighter weight and ease of walking.

    As I was doing my research, I found following published numbers for boot weights. I know your numbers are higher. Your stats are for size 46 EU. Here are comparison at size 44 EU / 10 U.S.; exception of the Crossfire I listed:

    - Forma Terrain TX Enduro comes in at 3.85 lb. for EU 44
    - SIDI Crossfire 2 TA comes in at 4.55 lb. / boot for size 11 U.S.
    - SIDI X-3 comes in at 3.8 lb. for size 44 EU / 10 U.S.


    Over the weekend, I took advantage of crappy weather and looked over a number of ADV+/MX boots. Something in the sub premium ( entry to mid ) MX boot. Something lightweight with a tad more protection than a full MX boot. Also ideally something with a more enduro sole. I prefer Welted sole ( TA style ). My foot runs narrow. With insole and thick socks / waterproof sock, I wear a 44 EU / 10 U.S.

    Anyhow, my short list looks like this and I'll explain my preferences ( based on what I've read ):

    - SIDI Crossfire 2 TA
    - SIDI X-3
    - Forma Terrain TX Enduro

    Based on what I've been reading on ADV and elsewhere, all three of these boots are on lighter side of spectrum compared to upper end models. From what all the reviews state, SIDI Crossfire 2 TA gets very good marks for dual hinge, walkability, zero break-in, replacement parts, adjustability, and protection. But bit more than what I would like to spend. Although, current pricing for SIDI Crossfire 2 TA is around $445.

    OK my opinion on SIDI X-3. I also own a SIDI Charger, which is very similar. I stumbled on Simon Pivey's 9 out of 10 review in Brake Maganize. This Dakar rider gives the SIDI X-3 some very strong endorsement. Both for value and features. http://www.brake-magazine.com/rated-sidi-xtreme-srs-boots/

    I did get a chance to try a pair of SIDI X-3. It felt a lot like the Chargers I have. However, the right boot seemed to have some pressure point when bending at ankle. I am pretty sure the boot was defective. Not 100% sure if didn't tuck the plastic straps under tung or not. Anyhow I sent them back. I am still willing to try a different pair. Only then can I be sure if the first pair was defective somewhere. But I really think this boot could work out for me for type of riding I do.

    Last the Forma Terrain TX Enduro gets all around great reviews. Including your earlier comments. Great value. Since, I have some time before my April trip, I am thinking of trying the Forman Terrain TX and SIDI X-3 before deciding to jump up to SIDI Crossfire 2 TA. The 2018 inventory is in being processed ; per USA distributor.

    I know the boots aren't waterproof. I do have a pair of Seal Skin and pair or Hydrosock from Motorrad. I like your idea of always carrying a pair of compact shoes / sneakers for those longer treks away from bike. I normally pack a pair or super compact Sanuks.

    Thanks LostInPA. Appreciate thoughts, comments, follow up.

    Kam
    #42
  3. nk14zp

    nk14zp Long timer

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    O'neal MX boots.
    #43
  4. Grreatdog

    Grreatdog Long timer Supporter

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    If I could only own one pair for dual sport and enduro, it would be the Sidi X-3. I exchanged the Chargers I tried for the Adventures. I also had O'Neal MX boots (that got upgraded to Crossfires).But I had a hell of a time deciding.

    I finally decided that I didn't need all the protection of the Charger and went with the easier to use and walk in Adventure. But I really liked that Charger boot. As a lower cost one boot to do everything compromise between dual sport and enduro riding, that X-3 is hard to beat.
    #44
  5. GF-kam

    GF-kam Been here awhile

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    Hey Grreatdog,

    When you purchased your SIDI X-3, did they have any pressure points or hot spots around ankle when bending knee? Especially during early period? If so did it eventually go away after brake in period?

    Sounds like you and Simon Pivey, UK Dakar Rally veteran, like the SIDI X-3 . I watched so much of the Dakar Rally this year.

    ...cheers,

    Kam
    #45
  6. Grreatdog

    Grreatdog Long timer Supporter

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    I don't remember anything and I have a crazy sensitive baseball sized right ankle bulge of relocated parts. But the Chargers I tried did run narrow.

    I don't know about what changes might have been done to the X-3. Basically, Chargers were old school MX boots updated with a hinged ankle.

    So they felt very familiar. I am also about 99.9% sure the lower boot and hinge up to the first upper buckle are identical to the Adventure.

    That's also why I swapped them for the Adventures. As far as I can tell, the only differences between the X-3 and Adv are the closure and boot height.
    #46
  7. LostInPA

    LostInPA Professional American

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    Hi

    Nope not a dealer. Just a dude. I research and try a lot of stuff. :-)

    You can score a 2017 pair of Forma Terrain TX Enduros at American sites on closeout pricing now. The 2018 version has updated buckles but that's about it.

    I generally order my boots from here: https://www.motostorm.it/en/boots/sub-offroad.html?currency=USD

    You can get the 2018 Terrain TX Enduros for $242 US: https://www.motostorm.it/en/clothing/boots/forma-terrain-tx-enduro-black-anthracite.html

    Many other guys on here have ordered from Motostorm as well. They are in Italy where all the bootmakers are. Now don't take this as offensive as I am part Italian, but they aren't super fast to get your order in the mail like if you ordered something from Germany, but it will get in the mail in about a week and once it does, it ships international DHL or FedEx. I have not had to pay customs on any boots and I don't think anyone else has commented they have either. It's an option. Of course if you return something, that might be more complicated. Return shipping is your responsibility. You can return in 30 days in as new (never ridden) condition.

    I find the Crossfire 2-TA has a standard to just shy of wide foot bed. The SRS model runs narrow in my opinion. The height of the toe box on the TA models is pretty standard. The SRS model is big and fat feeling to me like a Nike athletic shoe. I prefer traditional soles too. I like to shift with the edge of the sole. Anyway...

    The Forma boots have a bit wider foot bed in the toe area than the 2 TAs and a little more compact fit in the ankle above the actual ankle joint. It kind of locks you in good. The toe box height is a touch taller than the Crossfires, which I like because I usually wear real thick wool socks most of the year.

    I didn't notice any significant break in period with either boot. Maybe one day ride or two. The hinged ankles make a huge difference to eliminating break in feel.

    I have not tried the updated X-3s but they should be one of the lighter boots in terms of weight. They look good to me. I would definitely try them and the Formas as the best value boots. I don't think you're giving up anything in protection, other than on the Crossfire 3 and Predator 2.0 the ankle hinges have hyper extension stops, but honestly I don't think that's a huge deal for 90% of dudes. A nice to have if a boot has it, and probably more of a concern for fast motocross guys.

    These mid price boots don't have all the premium memory foam elements like when compared against a Crossfire 2/3 or Gaerne SG12, Predator 2.0, etc. That's fine with me as my boots get filled with really stinky coal mine water and crap all the time. I take out the factory insoles and use Dr. Scholls gel work boot insoles. Helps kill vibrations the from bike and more comfortable for all day battle.

    Oh also Forma sells a waterproof boot liner for their boots. Probably pretty similar to seal skins.

    KLIM also sells a Gortex one. Prior year model seemed highly reviewed.
    https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/klim-covert-gtx-waterproof-boot-liner
    #47
  8. GF-kam

    GF-kam Been here awhile

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    Hey LostInPA,

    Glad to meet an expert.

    Sounds like the Forma Terrain TX Enduro should fit my parameters. I'll give them a shot next. I'll put a photo so others will know what the Forma Terrain TX Enduro looks like:

    [​IMG]

    More info on the boot at Forma USA website: https://www.formabootsusa.com/collections/off-road-boots/products/terrain-tx-enduro

    Like you mentioned, looks like the 2018 model is pretty much same as 2017 with exception of upgraded buckles. Same buckles as the Forma Predator 2.0. Only one color for U.S. market. Looks like a ash black. Almost a very dark grey.

    Appreciate the Motostrom link. Since I am not 100% sure of fitment, I'll try to source locally with friendly exchange / return policy. Worth the extra value added.

    I too normally take the stock boot insole out and replace it with Superfeet orange color insole. The high density one. Acts a bit to dampen shock.

    https://www.superfeet.com/en-us/insoles-and-sandals/orange

    I asked someone to weigh his Forma Terrain TX Enduro in size 44 EU ( 10 U.S. ). Came in at 3.8 lbs. So, the boot it just as light as the SIDI X-3, which is one of the lightest ADV+ / MX single hinged boot.

    For other who are reading this post. When it comes to lack of waterproof, I am not too concerned. I plan to wear this boot in areas that may require walking bike through creek /crossing. I do have a fully waterproof Forma Terra for everyday riding. Note to all. Almost all boots are only waterproof to the inner tung of the boot. Not the very top of boot. So, if you're doing a water crossing or paddling through it. More than likely it will get wet. A bootie won't do much good in that situation. I am going to give a waterproof sock a try.

    I'll keep you posted once I get my hand on one. Thanks.

    Kam
    #48
  9. gpack

    gpack XL-er

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    I do not mean to barge in on this post, but rather inquire about the Forma line. Can anyone confirm any sizing differences (not fit) or similarities between the O'neal line of boots and the Forma line? I have tried on O'neal Element boots and am curious if the Forma boots would run the same size (fit obviously could differ).
    #49
  10. outty

    outty (☞゚ヮ゚)☞

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    Another Alpinestars Tech 7 user here - I came to the conclusion that water ingress is a necessary compromise for proper safety. Cold is always going to be better than Pain.
    #50
  11. Dan Diego

    Dan Diego Long timer

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    60D77AE2-6152-4487-BC4E-02B459619BF0.png
    I’m in the same boat. I have some Sidi Crossfire’s and they are the absolute best I’ve found for protection, ankles and otherwise. But they’re so dang heavy.

    I also have a pair of Sidi Canyon GoreTex. Comfortable and waterproof, though no ankle or toe protection.

    I bought some MSR VX motocross boots (tall, heavy, decent ankle prot cation) and some Gaerne Explorers recently. I like the Gaernes and those may be my new DS boot.



    If you’re serious about ankle protection, the Sidi Crossfires or Adventures (a bit lighter) are the way to go.
    #51
  12. GF-kam

    GF-kam Been here awhile

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    +1 State well.

    Like I said earlier, no unicorn boot, gear, bike, etc. that does it all. You also have to look at the types of water crossings you plan to be encountering. If deeper than cuff ( shin ) doesn't matter if you have a waterproof boot; assuming you're paddling or walking bike across.
    #52
  13. Janus9

    Janus9 Been here awhile

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    Having broke both tib and fib with basic boots, it is MX style boots from now on for me. I will probably try a pair of Forma Terrain enduro. I will pack a pair of trail runners so if I have to hike, it won't be an issue.
    #53
  14. SpeedyR

    SpeedyR SE in the SE

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    +1 on what others have said about boots with a hinge. less break in and comfortable with a high degree of protection. I have the Crossfire 2 TA as the stitched on sole tends to be more comfortable, and possibly easier to replace down the road. I've used TCX MX boots in the past as well, but just didn't fall in love with the more recent versions.

    I like the extra protection, and they are plenty comfortable for a few day long trips. I carry some extra shoes for kicking around camp, but the Sidis are pretty good on the bike and basic walking around (not going to go hiking in the boots, but for the protection, they are good to go).

    If you want to keep your feet dry, look around for a pair of gore-tex socks. They are a bit harder to find these days, but that's a good option that allows you to use them in different boots and dry out the boots easier as well.
    #54
  15. SRFade

    SRFade FeHorse Rider

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    Wore out an early pair of Sidi Adventure boots which ultimately became like bedroom slippers - super comfortable but really no serious protection. Have been relying on my older Sidi Chargers but were always a little on the narrow side. Looking forward to trying on the new Sidi Crossfire 3 TA as my next "go-to" boot when a local retailer finally gets a size 48 in stock. I have become a firm believer in a properly hinged MX platform as the right solution for these heavy adventure bikes as well as our true dirt bikes. I only hope my Klim Badlands Pro pants will go over the Crossfires as they just barely fit over the Chargers.
    #55
  16. razelrap

    razelrap n00b

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    Ant thoughts on "Low" top ADV boots. I have wondered if any of you have heat sensitive calves and rule out Low boots as a result. Or is the thought of Low top = Low protection level a serious notion.
    Sidi Crossfire 2 are a little tight and only come in a US 13. If they made a US14 I would buy another pair. I do like the fit of the Sidi Charger in US14.
    #56
  17. kainam00

    kainam00 Been here awhile

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    I can give a quick review of the Forma Terra Evo, which would hopefully be helpful as there doesn't seem to be too much real world on them out there.

    To Summarize - these boots are all day comfortable, great to walk in (awesome soles), and very waterproof. Protection is not MX boot level. Probably directly in the middle between a full street boot and a MX boot. Ankle "hinge" on these is a bit of a gimmick.

    ----- More detail ----
    I've had the Forma Terra Evo boots since spring of 2018 and put a lot of miles on them, including the Alcan 5000, a bunch of dual sporting, some singletrack...etc. Probably 10,000 miles or so ridden in everything from 100 degree Arizona heat to 30 degree rain in Michigan and Alaska.

    Comfort: A
    I can wear these 14 hours a day with no issue. Walk around in them and so on. They are very flexible, relatively light, and breathe alright for a waterproof boot.

    Waterproofness: A
    I've pushed my bike through creeks in these without getting wet. Hours of heavy rain will eventually see some water getting through, but I think that's unavoidable with almost anything.

    Protection: C
    The level of protection on these boots is somewhere between a street boot and an MX boot. Probably slightly below an entry level MX boot (less than my GFs Alpinestars Tech 1 for sure). These have elements of MX boots such as a shin plate and plastic around the ankle, but overall the boot is very flexible. The toe box is pretty soft and there is no protection at all for the top of your foot, which is a bit concerning from a "bike-crushing-your-foot" perspective.
    The ankle hinge is not designed very well as it's made from very soft plastic, which flexes instead of "hinging" like it should. Additionally, the bending action causes the hinge to portrude from the boot, which catches on parts of the bike and can interfere with rear brake operation if you're not used to it. I think it may offer marginal protection from rolling your ankle and some plastic over the bones, but I can't see it preventing hyper-extension or flexion at all, as I can bend my foot to painful levels by hand. If you're expecting an offroad style hinge ala Gaerne SG-12, you will be very disappointed. I would much rather have seen a blade-type design like the cheaper A-stars.

    You can see the upper portion of the hinge bending outwards in this picture:
    IMG_3642.JPG


    Durability: B
    Aside from the weird hinge issue the boots are holding up very well. Sole wear is minimal even after all this time on spiky dirtbike pegs.

    Quality: B-
    Premium materials - the leather feels great, the plastics and aluminum elements are very high quality. However, assembly seems to be lacking. I've had to warranty two pairs due to quality issues. For what it's worth these are made in Eastern Europe and not Italy, so I feel like having the Italian flag all over the boot is a little dishonest. It's not bad, but it's not Gaerne level - based on my experience with two pairs of each anyway.

    Customer service: A
    The quality issues I've had were resolved quickly and personally via the Forma USA folks.

    These boots have served me well and I would probably recommend them if not for the hinge, which at best doesn't do much.
    #57
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  18. simplemind

    simplemind Been here awhile Supporter

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    We're on the same page. I just bought the Adventures because of the hinge, and because they're reasonably light. I'm also on the fence with regard to the hiking sole, but time will tell.
    Have you seen any injury related postings (other than the one above) while wearing the Adventures. If you know of some, I'd like to read them.
    #58
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  19. JerryJakarta

    JerryJakarta Adventurer

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    For me definitely Fox Insticnt.. previous using Tech 10 Alpine, Better use Mx boots compare adv Boots considering Medical bill is getting far more expensive these days..
    #59
  20. MX Engineer

    MX Engineer MX Racer

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    I love my Fox Instinct for motocross, but I chose adventure boots for my trip, and I am sure that was the right choice for that trip and for the adventure riding in general.

    On the other hand, the choice of the bike to go off-road, the one that can crush my leg if it happens to get underneath it, was really stupid. I have since sold my 1190R and do not miss it a single bit. If I ever buy another adventure bike for any significant off-road riding, it will definitely be under 400 lbs.
    #60