Africa Twin - Another broken rear rack

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by stou, May 14, 2017.

  1. MillennialFalcon

    MillennialFalcon Improvement starts with self

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    I'm pretty sure what did my rack in was using a handle to lift the bike after a static lay down due to putting a foot down in very loose sand as my front tire was washing out. I heard a pop as I begun the lift. But also the 35-40 pounds of cargo I've been putting back there combined with my high speed dirt washboard riding probably put the initial stress cracks in place. Will take pictures soon. Used gorilla glue on the crack while waiting for the ATO rack to be released. Will likely strap cargo around under side of seats in the mean time so I'm not putting more stress directly on the handles.

    So far for me the biggest disappointment of this bike is the design of this rack and it's lack of structural integrity. Who the hell would hang solid panniers off this thing? Isn't that the point of the two square bits on each side?
    #61
  2. rally roo

    rally roo Total poser

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    I've thought about doing the same; how are you attaching the stainless handles to the remaining plastic piece? Will the rest of the rack be reinforced at all?
    #62
  3. BMacW650

    BMacW650 .

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    I posted this a while back on the farkle thread. One guy here keeps on saying how this design by holan is different than the previous one, to me his comment is irrelevant, since this design is just as strong and well tested since I had it. To me it's a much better design than the first version.

    I bought the holan luggage rack because it has a solid cross brace support under the plastic tail rack. It mostly functions as a lateral support, but has the added benefit of strengthen the tail rack and distribute the weight to other mounting points.

    I thought it was clever design 'feature' compare to most other mounting solutions.

    Someone here has a better write up on the installation. https://stromingtheworld-en.com/201...holan-nomada-pro-ii-pannier-system-to-the-at/

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    #63
  4. nordicbiker

    nordicbiker Been here awhile

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    Sorry, I don't get it! Why are so many folks putting those huge platforms on the plastic rack? If you are not riding with a passenger and have low mounted side panniers you have plenty of space to strap a huge packsack on the passenger seat! No need to challenge the structural integrity of the rear carrier.

    I am now using the Mosko Moto Reckless 80 which goes over the passenger handles (made the base a bit wider) and use the luggage platform for the tent (4kg) only!
    #64
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  5. cjmadura

    cjmadura Been here awhile

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    Top racks are simply not meant to handle such heavy loads. I wish they could, but the bikes handling will plummet while you'll be hard pressed to keep the bike under control at walking speeds - probably the most important speeds when truly off-road. I pack all my heavy crap in the aluminum panniers (low and close in), while my light-weight, bulky items pack in the upper bags. I don't even notice the extra weight on the big GSA.

    [​IMG]20170520_102321 by cjmadura, on Flickr

    The snow, however, was a problem.

    FYI, - A Mosko 25L Scout is mounted atop each pannier, while a 60L Scout is on the rear rack/rear seat area.
    3 Sets of Rok straps to hold it down. Super easy to load/unload, no adverse effects on handling.....and BMW was wise enough to use a steel rack on the bike. Shame on Honda and all the other manufacturers out there (BMW included on certain models) who stick plastic racks on bikes meant for "real adventure".
    #65
  6. Noprogram

    Noprogram High Plains Drifter

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    The load of the OP certainly doesn’t look like it should get anywhere near breaking the rack under normal conditions. The problem being that any mass, especially off road, is subject to rapid vertical accelerations and decelerations. Force being mass x acceleration means that impact loadings can potentially be very high especially over short durations...impact loads. The 10kg recommended static load limit on the rack should have a reasonable safety factor built into it for the use case scenario (adv riding) and static load failure point might be more like 30-40kg or more possibly (if someone wants to try it out!).

    It could be just the material (glass reinforced ABS?) but the break looks like a brittle fracture sustained under an impact force. -High force sustained over a very short period of time will tend to shatter a material rather than deform it, hence the crystalline appearance of the break. Possibly the bike/rack took most of the impact and you didn’t notice it? There are also cyclic loads that can fatigue/stress fracture a part over time prior to failure even though those loads are well under the yield strength of the materials etc. All manufacturers would do finite element analysis (FEA) on their components during the design phase for typical load scenarios, but it's difficult to test for every combination of force inputs of course i.e. people are always inventing new ways to break things!

    One of the problems with having a stronger rack on a motorcycle from a manufacturers and a users point of view is that encouraging loads up high and to the rear of the axle tends to have a detrimental effect on handling. That's one of the CRFs strengths.....good handling due to mass centralisation. Personally I always try to bring any loads forward and down low as much as possible to centralise mass and eliminate excessive forces on the rack. Kriega have a good system that allows you install webbing loops under the passenger seat to hook their dry bags into, which is how I carry my tools and day ride gear usually.

    I also installed a B&B Offroad Maxi Luggage rack on my CRF which has a plate that fits over the passenger seat and is bolted to the smaller rear rack portion. -The forward plate is partially supported by the passenger handles arms and the rear racks mounts which suits my soft pannier set up (GL Siskiyou and Andy Strapz). Generally I’ll only put my tent (1.5kg) and a Kriega US 20 with clothes on the rack/s to avoid any handling issues previously mentioned but I wouldn't be concerned putting a duffle on if I had to either. -Soft luggage in this instance wouldn't transfer as much impact load into a rack even at the same mass as a hard structure as it would tend to distribute the energy collapsing/deforming the soft structures over a larger time frame (assuming you weren't carrying bricks etc!).

    [​IMG]
    #66
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  7. jmarleau

    jmarleau Been here awhile

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    I like wider luggage plates. IMO they are by far the best way to secure soft luggage. I think going with a wide secure plate that does not hang too far past the OE plastic mount is the answer. Rubber mountings (thick soft rubber spacers above and below the OE plastic mount) will also vastly reduce vibrations and the sudden shocks that are transferred directly to the plastic.
    #67
  8. stou

    stou Been here awhile

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    Noprogram, I really like Kriega dry bags solution. I think I will go that way. My wife has is own bike and I never ride 2 up. The Kriega combo 50 look very good. Like you, I also need something for the camping gear. I put all my stuff in my Nanuk hard case and the camping gear in a dry bag. It can also be easy to work some straps like the Kriega and use it with a regular 50L dry bag.

    kriega-us-combo-50.jpg

    IMG_0018w.jpg
    #68
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  9. Noprogram

    Noprogram High Plains Drifter

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    The Kriega dry bags modules are a great system and very versatile for both packing and mounting Stou. I have the US Combo40 and a couple of extra US10s and US5s depending on what I need for the day, weekend or touring. I find the US10 is good for my tool roll and tire kit for a day trip for example. I'll put on the 20 if I want to put in some clothes etc. -I have a R20 backpack as well which the US5 can attach to for some extra capacity. The total system gives a lot of flexibility in terms of configurations, organisation and volumes.

    That CRF looks great in black!
    #69
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  10. stou

    stou Been here awhile

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    Thanks Noprogram!
    #70
  11. stou

    stou Been here awhile

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    I went to the dealer today. She doesn't had any news from Honda, so she called while I was there. We had good news, it will be covered by the guarantee, the part and the labor! :D:D:D

    They ordered the part!
    #71
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  12. Mrob

    Mrob Been here awhile

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    Good news indeed.
    #72
  13. MillennialFalcon

    MillennialFalcon Improvement starts with self

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    To me the OEM rack is the only injustice of this bike's design and complete BS...like "what the hell Honda!?" IMO, the ATO rack is the only mandatory farkle for this bike assuming you carry anything on the tail or a passenger ever. I'm pretty sure my rack cracked due to load on the tail, then what really did it in was me lifting the bike from a nap with an unhealthy jerking motion on one of the handles.

    I'll post pictures of mine when I take it off for installing my ATO rack. The ATO guys are geniuses in my book for identifying how crap the OEM rack is. Not just the materials and design, but how integrated into the entire back end of the bike it is for being such crap. I am horrified I had a passenger on mine whatsoever.
    #73
  14. tremor38

    tremor38 Long timer

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    I highly doubt one would a ever lose a passenger because of the rack.

    Sent from my SC-02H using Tapatalk
    #74
  15. michaeln

    michaeln What're YOU lookin' at? Supporter

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    Some folks are stupid enough to grossly overload the rear rack.
    #75
  16. tremor38

    tremor38 Long timer

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    With overloading and rough terrain issues duly acknowledged, Honda would do well for itself to add some insurance by reenforcing the rack in similar fashion to what Yamaha did for the Super Tenere.

    Sent from my SC-02H using Tapatalk
    #76
  17. twinrider

    twinrider Pass the catnip

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    By adding a metal bar to the underside of the rack. I had zero issues over 40000 miles, but I don't overload my top box with heavy gear because it's bad for the handling . No issues with the AT rack either for the same reason. People seem to forget that the original goal of the ATO rack was to eliminate the large oem grab handles.
    #77
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  18. ripping r

    ripping r Been here awhile

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    Yes and now some of us are waiting on the rack that will not go past the pillion seat. I can hardly wait.
    #78
  19. twinrider

    twinrider Pass the catnip

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    Who's making that? ATO?
    #79
  20. C.J.

    C.J. Sierra Nevada Rider

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    And the tool box and the chain saw carrier and the Mosko reckless 80 support hoops. All kinds of cool stuff can be built off there system.

    Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
    #80