Africa Twin CRF1000L suspension

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by uk_mouse, Jun 22, 2016.

  1. madafakinges

    madafakinges CrfL

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    Maybe MARZOCCHI 45 MM from husky 610/630
  2. intosite

    intosite Adventurer

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    Feb 22, 2017
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    30
    Anyone ever opened up the preload adjusters for the shock? Friend broke his by over tightening them, and now it won't stay extended. Took it out and tried to turn the knob, and it just turns endlessly, while you can see it extending out, if just using hands and compress it, it'll just return back to 0 extension.

    Tried opening the "nut" just behind the knob's cylinder, seems like it's plastic, and it deformed... Wondering if possible to service it.
  3. Motociclo

    Motociclo Been here awhile Supporter

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    Haven't dismantled mine.
    Heres something that may help.

    http://norwestsuspension.com/rebuilding-your-hydraulic-preload-adjuster
    ziroalex likes this.
  4. Motociclo

    Motociclo Been here awhile Supporter

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    Worth a look for sure.
  5. BronNowo

    BronNowo Been here awhile

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    honestly so big bike should have 48mm forks at least...
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  6. gve.mcmlxxiv

    gve.mcmlxxiv Been here awhile

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    Right. All these other solutions feel like arranging deck chairs on the titanic. “Mechanical strength increases with the beam thickness squared”
  7. Black99S

    Black99S Been here awhile

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    It is hydraulic. If the fluid hasn't leaked out, the piston & seals will be OK.
    Always best to have the rear suspension unloaded (on centre stand) while adjusting the preload, that way it is easy to crank.
  8. swimmer

    swimmer armchair asshole

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    I don't think it's the size of the bike alone that creates the problem. The nearly 100lbs heavier VFR1200X has 43mm forks and no wear/leakage issues. If the VFR1200X had 9" of travel and still 43mm would it have problems?
  9. gve.mcmlxxiv

    gve.mcmlxxiv Been here awhile

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    Doesn’t it?
  10. Motociclo

    Motociclo Been here awhile Supporter

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    As i can't leave well enough alone,i am about to try a new shock spring.
    Ktech 105N spring. This is about 10.7kg.
    It is a touch longer, 7mm, than stock spring.
    But not as long as spring a currently have.
    Which is 10mm longer. Current rate 9.8kg.
    Will use much less preload to achieve desired sag. This gives a plusher intial feel, but being higher rate, gives better bottom resistance.
    Gives better range also if i pack kitchen sink in my luggage!!!
    Fitment, no additional adapters either.
    Minimal valving change to rebound also.

    20190903_213902.jpg
    Amphib likes this.
  11. Greg the pole

    Greg the pole There are no stupid questions, only stupid people

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    now now...the band stayed on till the very end.
    Now..if Rose only shared that god damned door...it was big enough for two people!!!:1drink
  12. Greg the pole

    Greg the pole There are no stupid questions, only stupid people

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    sure it does. yes the tenere had 43mm forks and they never really wore, but valving was shit from the factory, and the oem shock was a joke.
    That said, I didn't ride the XT as hard as the AT. The AT begs for it, as it has the clearance. So if the clearance is there, the electronics are decent, and the rest of the bike is good, why the hell did they put in a shit fork that had previous issues into a bike that is much heavier? Money...they needed to save money.


    Watch this full vid of the 790R vs the T7. esp the bit where he jumps the bike over a little hill. The T7 bounces after the 1st jump. Classic japanese play. Save money on suspension. Shit, even if the T7 would have a 48mm fork, and a rebuildable shock, those in the know would sort it quickly enough.

    At least KTM gives you the option of a 43mm fork vs a 48mm. Yes you have to pay extra for it, but it's cents on the dollar, of what you would have to spend after the fact.

    The ohlins did fine on the BDR. Over the big water bars, you could pre load the AT, wheelie the front wheel over the large rut, where it would otherwise fall in and bottom, and have the rear shock do all the work. He shot a vid of me doing the same water bar but with moar preload, as i'm getting up to the jump...MOAR air!!! didn't bottom.
    Not once did we see a big jap bike on the BDR (Super T, VFR, Varadero) We did see a few GS WC 12s, a 1290 (older one), tons of guys on exc 500s, 1090s, one other AT. The type of customer that buys the big boys, will never wander far off road. Just the idea that they can is the only real reason they buy one.
    The AT did very well on the BDR, on the paved portions, on the free way at 90 mph plus. And it smashed out a 1k km day with zero complaints to get me home. Great bike, shit supsension.


    Another side note...even on a 300cc dirt bike (200lb wet), I could have gone with a BETA X-trainer (43mm forks, partial adj. and a smaller shittier rear shock), I elected to go to a BETA 300RR, full adjustment on 48mm forks, and stiffer. I don't ride my 300 fast, but need all the compliance, feed back, and consistency out of a good fork and shock.
  13. intosite

    intosite Adventurer

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    Yup that's what I do for mine. Sadly my friend already broke his. The knob just turn never coming to a stop/bottoming out. Just trying to figure how to fix it.
  14. Motociclo

    Motociclo Been here awhile Supporter

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    Oddometer:
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    Thought i would share my tip for shock removal/install.
    I remove preload knob.
    Undo all associated bolts.
    I use a bottle jack under swing arm to take weight. Remove bolts.
    Raise swing arm to approx parallel, turn shock so res is facing/resting on coolant res. This will put the preload adjusted pretty much pointing at tyre.
    Slowly raise swing arm with jack and pull gently down and back shock.
    It gets you a point where shock slips out with minimal fuss.
    It will pop out with out need to remove reg/rec.
    Here is approx swing arm angle for shock removal and instal.
    This will get shock out with minimal scuffing to all parts concerned.
    Install, preload adjuster in first. This will have shock at an angle. Then sort of up and round in a semi circle motion. Not much room, but shock will slip into place.
    Doesn't hurt to hold the linkage back towards tyre, this lets shock stay more in centre line of opening.
    One man task. No heavy lifting or rear wheel removal.

    1567832208570248420786886359643.jpg
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  15. Junglejeff1

    Junglejeff1 Long timer

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    Hard to describe this high technology in small words (sorry just giving you shit).The main problem is they used a old design that did not work great when new.I actually used these same forks in 1990 on a cr.They did the same thing back then that was almost exactly half the weight.This fork was one of the reasons the super slick bushings were made.If you go way the heck back in the posts here you can read my reason's for this issue which mostly seem true.We have a tube that tends to bend at lower triple clamp.That was found in early 90,s and race tech came out with super slick.You can build your own super slick by taking a file and put a good chamfer on the edge of the stock bushings(but not as cool as saying you have superslicks at Starbucks,now you are are a hillbilly hack).We have been doing this stuff to our race bikes since early 90,s.Sooo basically the the upper tubes are flexy junk.From what I am seeing so far the adventure tubes are superior(of course they are as they are thicker were it counts)and will last longer than most will ride this bike.If my sort of experimental hard coat wears out from cogent I will go that way.Might even put in aftermarket cartridges in forks but my gold valves with cool valving are working pretty good for me.Check the book out motorcycle engineering by Phil Irving. Old school but still very applicable to today's bikes.I do get a kick when he says v twins would die.He did not know about the future HD ad campaigns then lol.
    gve.mcmlxxiv likes this.
  16. H3llbent

    H3llbent n00b

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    Sep 7, 2019
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    Location:
    Montreal
    Hi guys, Just wondering where does the 2019 non ATAS fit in suspension wise? do the tubes have the same features besides the travel difference? just hit 3k km on my 2019 and starting to ride it harder offroad. Feel like I might start running into issues since I can literally see the fork wet noodling under me in the rocks....
    [​IMG]
  17. Motociclo

    Motociclo Been here awhile Supporter

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    Same features.
    Will have same issues as previous modeks.
  18. H3llbent

    H3llbent n00b

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    They do look kashima coated though, colour of the anodizing/coating is the same as my kashima fox shocks on my sled.
  19. Motociclo

    Motociclo Been here awhile Supporter

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    I had Kashima re coated outers, wore through. Know of others with oem kashima coated tubes, 2018, and they wore through also.
    The outer fork tubes on reg AT, are spaghetti legs. To much flex. This is bulk of the problem.
  20. RBMann

    RBMann Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2006
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    North of Seattle
    I have complained before so now will give an update. My Ohlins forks finally arrived 13 months after I ordered them. I installed them and left the next day for a planned one week trip of backroads in WA and OR. The first thing I noticed was the Ohlins are a lot stiffer. When making low speed u-turns or reacting to deflections from rocks on a trail the front tire tracks with the handlebars. I used to be amazed by the amount of twist in the stock forks just swinging the bars left-right while stopped.

    D297--20190908_135548.jpeg

    At first there seemed to be a front to back imbalance using the the recommended settings from Ohlins for the forks and shock. Nice part of a multi-day trip was being able to make changes and ride for awhile on all different road surfaces . Front seemed harsh and the rear was soft. After a couple days I had backed off the compression setting for the forks and added some to the shock. Now I have the ride I wanted with much better handling on the road and trail.

    D297--20190908_175800.jpeg

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    D297--20190914_105729.jpeg

    A lot of $$$ for what I hope is the best solution. I didn't want to give Honda more money for ATAS forks when they should have spec'ed better forks originally.
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