African XRs' Xtreme Xmas Braaaaap

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Osadabwa, Dec 16, 2018.

  1. Osadabwa

    Osadabwa Don't be Surprised

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Oddometer:
    569
    Location:
    Nairobi, Kenya
    Like the three wise men of Christmas legend, we set out on a quest for the ages… only there were five of us not three, none of us could be considered “wise” even by today’s appallingly low standards, we had no gifts to bring and we’d be riding fire-breathing XR650Rs instead of camels into Kenya’s wilderness in search of riding mecca instead of the new-born King… ah hell this is a crappy analogy…

    Welcome to the Kenya XRR Xmas Xtreme Braaaaap!

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    While my hopeless riding buddies try to figure out how to share their photos and videos with me, I’ll just put up a few quick teaser pics here to whet the proverbial whistle... like a cheeky nip of scotch before Christmas dinner with Uncle Joe and Aunt Erma... in fact, a stumbling, drunken, secular theme might fit our little troupe a bit better. Let's try that.

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    Above: Easy, happy work… like trimming the Christmas tree while Uncle Joe sings jingle bells in a slurred, lisping Japanese accent

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    Above: Wonderful views, like the splendor and brilliance of first-fallen snow twirling into the open sunroof of Uncle Joe's '85 Camaro

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    Above: Rip-snorting fire-spitting madness, like when Uncle Joe drinks way too much eggnog and starts playing hide-and-seek with the cat in Aunt Erma’s mink coat, growling "Look at me! I'm a Lion, I'm a Lion!"

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    Above: Loss and confusion, like Uncle Joe’s drunken stumble through town looking for his reindeer, still wearing Erma’s mink, scratched to hell by that stupid cat and dragging a string of Christmas lights behind him still attached to the tree

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    Above: Hilarity, like when Erma farts and blames it on the cat who promptly coughs up a hairball on the sofa

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    Above: Rain, mud, falls, broken bikes and broken bones, because it’s Kenya and these holiday Christmas analogies fit about as well as Santa’s ass in Mrs' Clause's skinny jeans!

    Coming soon....

    Braaaap!

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    #1
    stallard, Spicciani2, ndevu and 16 others like this.
  2. BornAgain

    BornAgain Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2008
    Oddometer:
    646
    Location:
    Rosenberg, TX
    Hilarious I'm in. Which one is Uncle Joe?
    #2
    Osadabwa likes this.
  3. Cro59

    Cro59 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2015
    Oddometer:
    627
    Location:
    Tucson, Arizona
    Keep it coming...
    #3
    Osadabwa likes this.
  4. Osadabwa

    Osadabwa Don't be Surprised

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Oddometer:
    569
    Location:
    Nairobi, Kenya
    All week it had rained. It seems like it’s always raining in Nairobi these days. Then, on the morning of truth, the sun shines down on us like a good omen. Spirits are high, people are psyched – I had drawn up a good rip for us and it would be the first time in Kenya that 5 Honda XR650Rs got together for a ride. So, four of us met at Panic’s place for a nice breakfast, and we set off to our backyard Rift Valley Entrance to meet up with Wry and start the day.

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    Above: Bikes and bacon

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    Above: Fresh faced bikers

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    Above: Wry met us on the track

    I don’t misuse the word “literally”, so when I say that in literally less than 30km I thought my ride was over, I mean it. We had just started down the track that we take every time we go to the valley, when I drop the bike hard on the left side (always the left side for me). Liquid pours out onto the header. At first, I thought it was petrol and was pretty sure it was going to be Sayonara XR650R, but the color was wrong and it didn’t smell. It was coolant. Barely had the ride begun and I was certain it was over for me, but Neb and Panic thought otherwise. While I removed the seat and tank, Neb produced his J.B. Weld. Panic identified the crack (a talent of his) and began to clean the area, and when the J.B. Weld was mixed, applied a liberal dollop to the area. Half an hour of tense waiting later, we were on the road.

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    Above: 28.88 km into the ride at 9:52AM FFS… good thing level heads won out, otherwise I’d have gone home for my 1985 XL600, and believe me, it wouldn’t have liked what was yet to come

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    Above: Instructions for fixing a radiator

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    Above: Only a month ago, I rigged quick connects on that monster tank for just this very situation. I would have been pleased to see how well they worked, but one of them got damaged in the fall.

    With the bike back upright, we were on our way again. With five identical bikes and riders, we made quick work of the valley. Even with the radiator fix and a stopover in Ewaso Kedong for tea and chapati we made it past Mt. Suswa and up to Naivasha by lunch. Neb’s stomach convinced us to stop at the Ranch House, which was a brilliant idea and didn’t take too much time. From there, across the North Lake Road and up to Eburru with a stopover at a look-out spot Wry knew from his time as a Girlscout in the area as a lass. In no time we reached Gilgil for fuel.

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    Above: A new road in the valley and one of the many underpasses for Kenya’s multi-billion-dollar standard gauge railway. The Chinese are going to milking that debt for eternity.

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    Above: The usual look-out spot with Mt. Suswa in the distance

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    Above: Neb on the way to Ewaso Kedong

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    Above: Panic climbing up to Eburru

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    Above: Wrong way, Neb!

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    Above: Wry takes the lead to show where he used to go camping back in the day

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    Above: A nice lookout over unspoiled wilderness… Wry declares: Yeah, this isn’t the place

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    Above: Gilgil petrol station and a matatu reminding us that if something goes wrong, you can always put your bike up on the roof to get you home

    From Gilgil we eschewed the tar road to Nyahururu, opting instead to take farm backroads up into the green hillsides and sparse forests. It was lovely up there, but not exciting from a riding point of view, and after a few very annoying roads promised to rattle the teeth out of our heads for no benefit, the draw of a cold beer overcame our aversion to tarmac and we bee-lined it for the Thompson’s Falls Hotel.

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    Above: Agricultural heartland

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    Above: Nice dairy cows… too bad they produce 5L of milk per day instead of their likely 20L

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    Above: At Thompson’s Falls before dark

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    Above: Photo taken with a potato of the guys monopolizing the bar’s fireplace. We ate like kings at that place. Good food, hot fireplace, cold beers… later we’ll wish for those things

    The first day was never meant to be a toe-curler, but we were now on the edge of the crazy part of Kenya and had had a decent ride to warm up the bikes and the boys as well. Starting tomorrow, things would get more interesting.

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    #4
  5. Osadabwa

    Osadabwa Don't be Surprised

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Oddometer:
    569
    Location:
    Nairobi, Kenya
    Like kids with early bedtimes, we got plenty of sleep. The cold air at altitude was fantastic, and we awoke refreshed and ready for the day. After my ablutions, I grabbed the Bible from the drawer for some inspiration and opened to a place that had been dog-eared only to find it was Deuteronomy:23. So much for good omens. And sure enough, upon inspection of the bikes, it was discovered that Neb had lost 5 bolts holding his luggage rack together, and Rawlence had left his phone in Ewaso Kedong… it was a live-action version of the muppet show! The two dingleberries took off after breakfast to find the lost bits which put us off our ambitious schedule by a couple of hours.

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    Above: Morning light

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    Above: Still-shiny Pigs in a line... nice...

    We split from Nyahururu up through what used to be forest. One thing you can say for the incessant tree-cutting – it makes the views longer. Anyway, it was fun up there and mercifully dry. The red clay would have been horrible if wet.

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    Above: Elephants these days, tracking mud all over the carpet… I swear

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    Above: Wry and I enjoying the morning view

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    Above: Sheep graze where the forest has been conveniently removed

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    Above: At the turnoff between high-altitude greenery and the stony, hot Rift, a bodaboda tows a petrol-powered maize mill

    It was time to change the rhythm. We’d been enjoying the highlands too much. It was making us soft. The thing to do was to drop into the bowels of the Rift Valley again and have a look at Lakes Bogoria and Baringo. The sides of the Valley are all stones and thorns, though, so it was time to warm up a bit. This part of the Rift has a couple of distinct step-down layers, the first of which would take us to a cliff-side overlook of Lake Bogoria.

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    Above: Judging by the guard rail, I guess this road was better once

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    Above: Lake Bogoria in the far distance… we had a ways to go

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    Above: A local motorbike was really struggling to climb up this mess of a road. I give them credit for trying. The Pigs ate it up though both Rawlence and Wry boiled their brakes in the process. Muppets. Momentum is your fliend!

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    Dropping down to a semi-fertile valley, we raced along to the Bogoria look-out spot I’d found on Google Earth. We crossed a single-lane foot bridge, zipped through a village or two and surprised a clutch of men drinking illegal moonshine under a tree. They scattered like guinea fowl! We assured them later that we didn’t give a hoot what they were drinking. Bottoms up!

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    Above: I love my XRR thiiiiiis much

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    Above: I think it’s really neat that Wry is able to ride motorbikes as well as he does, given his… condition. We’re all very proud of you buddy. Keep it up okay!

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    Above: Panic the Pirate and Rawlence-of-a-Labia enjoy a nibble above the beautiful lake

    Rested, we powered on along the cliff’s edge. The track was fantastic stuff, rocky but quick with occasional views of the lakes below. Eventually, we eased off the edge of the hill back down into the valley for the first of many stream crossings of the trip. I went first and would have made a clown look graceful, but didn’t get wet. Rawlence dropped the bike just on the other side of the stream, thankfully, and needed a minute to rest before climbing the steep road up the other side, but we were soon on our way again.

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    Above: Beautiful up there… of course the road is most often used by charcoal burners, so they'll fix that

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    Above: First rocky bottomed stream crossing

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    Above: Back up the other side on more stony tracks

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    Above: Wry waits for the others

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    Above: Neb found a like-minded individual… this one was in the process of humping a stone. Down the track a ways, I came across a plague of field mice running hither and dither... must have been a hundred of them all out in the open. One of those Osadabwa moments.

    We had chewed up a lot of time getting to where we were, and the afternoon was looking long in the tooth already. We descended the second step into the valley floor, on level with the lakes, mostly, and after a bit of clowning around during which time the front bikers (Rawlence and Neb) missed our planned turnoff, we were set straight and blasting along a road that should have taken us across the East edge of Lake Baringo to link up with the Loruk-Maralal road. It was not meant to be.

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    Above: Dropping down the last step

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    Above: Fantastic views, fantastic riding

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    Above: The turnoff duka for water… those look like rainclouds in the distance

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    Above: One of many pegs-deep water crossings… foreshadowing


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    Above: A washed out bridge…

    Neb hit one of the water crossings with extra gusto and stalled the bike. A bit later, the bike was spluttering and just died. At the same time, the road was becoming increasingly sketchy… no recent tracks, and the old ones were black soil troughs full of water. The day was officially dying, and we were a long way from our destination. While Panic and Neb tried to identify the problem (it was the bloody kill switch…), the rest of us decided to change the plan. It would be daft to try to push through the unknown muddy track since we were still over 150km from our destination and it was past 5pm. We’d head for Lake Baringo instead.

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    Above: I don’t know how many times a faulty kill-switch has led to trail-side confusion. At least these bikes don't have kick-stand sensors!

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    Above: Further proof we should call it a day: we were starting to make mistakes. Panic managed to fall down in the mud rather than blipping over this washout (caught on video below...)

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    Above: Out of the mud and rocks and onto the tar for a 20km sunset cruise to Roberts Camp. Neb did much of it on the rear wheel.

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    Above: Cold beers in hand, happy bikers at the Thirsty Goat

    It had been an awesome day, but our plan change had put us 150km behind schedule. I went to bed thinking we’d probably be using our headlights tomorrow…

    Before you go, enjoy a little video from the day:


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    #5
  6. Osadabwa

    Osadabwa Don't be Surprised

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Oddometer:
    569
    Location:
    Nairobi, Kenya
    Damn this is a lonely thread, even for my standards. Are you not entertained??

    Anyway, on I go:

    Up with the birds to make time, we enjoyed a decent breakfast next to the lake and a pod of hippos that had settled in overnight out front of the dining room. It was another beautiful Kenyan day – warm but not burning, and cloud cover keeping the sun at bay. Nobody had any loose bolts, so we hammered the food and hit the road.

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    Above: Our digs for the night

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    Above: The hippos at breakfast

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    Above: A chilled old hornbill who could catch bits of bread in his beak

    We rode the remaining 10km on tar to the turnoff for Maralal. It’s funny how with the Pigs, our highway speeds tend to be 10-20kph slower than our on-dirt speeds! As soon as we feel the squiggle of dirt under the wheels, the throttle opens up. Not too long down the road, though, we were greeted with our first issue of the day: Neb got a puncture. Actually, he probably left the camp with the puncture and it finally got bad enough to be unrideable. But, since he’s running TuBliss, it was a matter of pulling out the plug kit and pumping back up. We were on the road in no time.

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    Above: Wry debates taking the coach back home

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    Above: Panic wears his feelings on his sleeve… waiting to fix (the first of) Neb’s punctures… hey Neb, maybe before a long trip, you should splash out on new rubber! TuBliss only works if the tire doesn’t die!

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    We were hauling ass. The road was a ripper. All of us had the bikes singing, and it had gone to our heads. We were leap-frogging each other to get photos and videos, and at some point I noticed that somebody was missing. Where was Panic? I went back 10km and still no Panic. This made me insane. I could only figure that somehow I’d missed him, so I head back up the track at a blistering pace. But in my head I couldn’t believe I’d missed him, so my conscience was nagging me. Finally I met the others. Sure enough, no Panic. At last, the cell phones are whipped out and we get ahold of the guy… seems it was he who couldn’t count to 5! While we waited, I drained the shit out of my float bowl that was making my bike bog at full throttle and we all had a laugh at Panic’s expense.

    The next piece of road to Maralal was electric. Fastest place any of us has ever ridden the Pigs. We know they’re capable of race speeds above 160kph, but so far that remains the rhelm of fiction for us. There’s never a time when you can just sit on the throttle that long out here. There’s always a washout or a goat or a blind corner to navigate. But up here, we all gave it a hell of a go. Neb hit 147kph and I and the others all skittered around the 130 mark. We arrived in Maralal on a serious high!

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    Above: The turnoff at Churo… the start of the racetrack

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    Above: Even the rocky sections were quick

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    Above: This was the flat-out stuff… not surprisingly, we don’t have many pics of this…

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    Above: In Maralal for a fuel and water stop. I met a girl with the coolest hairstyle ever.

    If the morning had been fantastic, I would be hard pressed to find adjectives to describe the rest of the day. From Maralal, a track crashes straight down the escarpment to Barsaloi, where we were planning to dive into the western reaches of the Milgis Lugga (sand riverbed) which would take us to the top of the Mathews mountain range. The descent was spectacular – a steep, concrete slab stuck to the side of the hill took us down through the greenery to a fast, whippy section through the riverbeds and washouts. In no time we were at the Milgis Lugga.

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    Above: Wry and I are pretty keyed up

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    Above: Heading down to Barsaloi

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    Above: Off the escarpment into the riverwashes and tall acacias

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    Above: Leaving the escarpment behind, on the way to Milgis

    The track and the riverbed crossed each other where a bunch of kids were playing. The sand was wet, and Panic and I were a bit nervous that it would be unrideable. These sand rivers have a nasty habit of hiding quicksand where saturated sections grab your tires and can swallow a bike up to the case in no time. So, in the beninging, we took it slow. That didn’t last long. The sand was firm and our confidence built rapidly. We went blitzing past a couple groups of Samburu warriors preening themselves along the shore, AK-47s leaning against the rocks. We shot through a narrow section with stone walls and then the Milgis spilled out into the desert. We stopped for a bite to eat where the river was easily a football field wide. Now we were in it!

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    Above: Neb shows the kids some photos

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    Above: Panic’s first tentative tracks onto the Milgis sand

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    Above: Arriving at the lunch spot in a blitz of flying sand

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    Above: Neb does a wheelie demo

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    Above: The lunch spot

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    Above: The indominable XRR

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    Above: We came to eat snacks and ride like maniacs… and our snacks are finished

    It’s hard to exaggerate how surreal and fantastic riding the Milgis is. We took off from the lunch spot like five angry wasps, each of us wide-open on the throttle. The bikes screamed down the riverbed, which begged you to make sweeping S-turns just because, and we flew over debris and washouts alike. Everybody was having a blast, and we were eating up the 40km of riverbed like it was nothing. Soon, though, it got really weird. As we turned due-East and approached the convergence of the Mathews Mountains and the bottom end of the Ndotos, a thunderstorm was squeezing its way through the gap, lifting the dried sand into a frenzy before us. It was Mad Max stuff, riding half blind into a fierce gale, with the dark cloud brooding overhead. Eventually, the rain fell, knocking the sand out of the air and leaving us breathless, resting in the lee of some island trees.

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    Above: the size of this riverbed is incredible, and it was good riding everywhere

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    Above: Sometimes the surface was loose, roostable sand

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    Above: Other times, it was a dried layer of curled mud

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    Above: When the sand storm came, Wry and Neb went flat-out into the abyss, stopping only to find out where the rest of us were. In the dust, we rode right past without catching sight of them.

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    Above: The energy in the atmosphere was addictive

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    Above: Sand storm in full force

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    Above: It seemed like a good time to do the XR praise ritual… when the sprit strikes, you have to let it take control!

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    Above: The rain came and washed away the airborne sand

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    Above: We were left with rivulets and a tacky, slightly slick top to finish out the section

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    Above: With sadness, we popped out of the Milgis to begin what would be a long afternoon in the Mathews Mountains!

    To be continued... I hit the ADV fun limit apparently...
    #6
    Lopburi, bomose, powderzone and 17 others like this.
  7. Osadabwa

    Osadabwa Don't be Surprised

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Oddometer:
    569
    Location:
    Nairobi, Kenya
    With the high of the Milgis still throbbing in our brains, we had a break to reconnect with reality. I was very pleased to see it wasn’t yet 2PM, and I figured at most we had 2 hours of riding to go. Two years ago, Rawlence, Kolobus and I had come thorough and I remembered it being a scenic mountain road. But that was two years ago. The heavy rains from one year back had taken that scenic road and turned it into an overgrown, washed-out track. To add to that, we started having some mechanical issues and fatigue was hitting Rawlence who was complaining of tennis elbow and double-barreled wanker’s wrist. And that wasn’t the worst of it…

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    Above: Out of the lugga, loving life

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    Above: The aftermath of all that braaping

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    Above: Panic… did you mean to lean that much?

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    Above: It was fantastic riding, if not exactly an easy cruise

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    Above: the views behind kept getting better and better

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    Above: Hmmm… where are the rest?

    We’d only moved along for about half an hour before things started to go pear shaped. Rawlence had taken two or three falls already, and given where we were, it wouldn’t be good if he hurt himself. He was exhausted and needed frequent breaks. Meanwhile, Neb’s crusty old front tire allowed in another thorn and Panic’s XR had spit out yet another chain roller, so we spent a good minute or sixty doing roadside repairs. Our pace had slowed from my estimate and our 2-hour ETA was turning into a 4-hour ETA. Luckily, we were in a beautiful place and the passers by were friendly and interesting as hell. The guy below in blue told us it’s a 4 day walk to the nearest town.

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    Above: Wry the peacenik chats with the mzee

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    Above: Fancy dress and the Panic

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    Above: Repairs are a good time for a little kip

    After the rest and a bit of Ibuprofen, Rawlence was back up and riding better. The trail stayed a rutted, rocky mess with a river crossings thrown in for good fun. It was gorgeous and fresh and we were making decent time.

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    Above: Rawlence ascending

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    Above: Nice, sandy-bottomed river crossings

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    After awhile, the road got better and we were moving again. In no time, we reached the junction for Kitich Camp, the lodge we’d be staying in for the night. I knew this track from a previous visit, and was keen to drift and rally my way up there, pull into camp with five pigs roaring and demand cold beers! It didn’t quite work out that way. The cool evening light kept us on the throttle and the track had us on our toes. The track had been many things, but muddy and slick it was not… until it was. There was only one section, one small section, of greasy black soil on an off-camber incline. I hit it and it made me pucker. Rawlence, whose "ambition outweighed his talent", hit it and broke his leg.

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    Above: The last section during golden hour

    Ordinarily, I’m quick to take photos of guys under their bikes, but for some reason I could tell this was not a laughing matter. I parked the bike and ran to Rawlence whose leg was bent behind him in a most unpleasant angle. He was clearly in pain and told me right away it was broken. We got him up and parked him under a beautiful old tree. Panic and I rode the rest of the way to camp and got the manager who jumped into action. In a little over an hour, we’d stabilized Rawlence’s leg with a SAM splint I’d brought (see why we bring it, Tigo?), and he was at the camp chilling as best he could.

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    Above: Rawlence under a tree with us stabilizing the leg… what the hell are you smiling about Neb?

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    Above: Loading the patient in the Kitich Cruiser… one of the camp staff giving 110kg Rawlence a piggy back ride!

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    Above: A beautiful sunset to top off a wicked and eventful (dare I say epic?) day!

    As darkness fell, Rawlence was carried to the mess hall and we all gorged ourselves on a lovely meal. A few whiskys around the fire later, and we were all knackered. It was another early night for our intrepid crew, but we’d earned the sleep.

    Before you go, however, check out the day's video. It's longer than usual because it was better than usual...


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    #7
    bomose, powderzone, ndevu and 16 others like this.
  8. Thomas B.

    Thomas B. desert racer

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2010
    Oddometer:
    953
    Location:
    Switzerland and around the globe
    Oh yeah man, I am entertained very much. I miss Africa. Been there at least 10 times, but not for a Long time. I should go back some day.
    Keep on Posting. We ARE watching.
    #8
    Osadabwa and mbanzi like this.
  9. Scribe

    Scribe £Bob£

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Oddometer:
    12,231
    Location:
    In my natural state
    First rate riding, writing, photography, videography even crashing! That sandy riverbed footage was pucker inducing a time or two.
    #9
    Osadabwa likes this.
  10. BornAgain

    BornAgain Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2008
    Oddometer:
    646
    Location:
    Rosenberg, TX
    What do ya mean nobody's following. There's myself and at least well maybe two others:lol3 Great photography and ya'll really make those BRP's dance. Hope Rawlence is better I broke my leg about a year and a half ago and it's just getting back to full strength. Give him my best regards for a speedy recovery.
    #10
    Osadabwa likes this.
  11. mbanzi

    mbanzi Adventurer

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2014
    Oddometer:
    32
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    Love the humorous report! Gives me flashbacks to my youth on a XR500R in South Africa. One day I shall return!
    #11
    Osadabwa likes this.
  12. AdvTraveler

    AdvTraveler Live to Ride

    Joined:
    May 6, 2015
    Oddometer:
    746
    Location:
    San Francisco - East Bay
    Nothing I like better than a BRP report especially when there are five involved.

    As you can see from my avatar I have one in the garage as well and love the damn thing.

    Thanks for taking the time and trouble to document the ride - it helps me get through my long boring days at the office.

    Sorry about Rawlence's leg - hopefully he is on the mend.

    Great area you get to ride.

    Great Christmas Card from the first photo.

    Happy Holidays!
    #12
    Osadabwa likes this.
  13. Bt10

    Bt10 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2012
    Oddometer:
    518
    Location:
    Saranac,MI
    We are all reading with pleasure. Your writing is like a good book that we have no need to interrupt you while you write new posts.

    Thanks for doing an excellent report that many of us wouldn't be able to do.
    #13
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  14. Osadabwa

    Osadabwa Don't be Surprised

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Oddometer:
    569
    Location:
    Nairobi, Kenya
    Aha, signs of life. Just needed a nudge I guess! I appreciate guys want to let the thread go unbroken, but what the hell...

    Many are asking after Rawlence. He's alive and kicking... well, limping... but in good spirits last I spoke with him. It dawned on him two days ago that he broke his leg and will be out of commission for 2 months in a cast plus 1 or 2 more of strength building, so naturally he's gutted, but he's his usual cheerful self about it. He took some pics/vids of his rescue which I'll put together as an epilogue if he sends them through. It was kind of crazy. Stay tuned. @BornAgain - it looks from your X-ray that you had a hell of a lot worse break than Rawlence did. His was "clean" and didn't require surgery.

    @AdvTraveler - I'm sure it's abundantly clear to you, but the XRR is far and away the best machine for this place. Amazing control in so many situations due to its "old school" suspension and "heavy weight". KTM riders don't get it, "Adventure" riders don't get it. I personally sold my EXC450, as did Wry, to buy a BRP and haven't looked back. Before that, I watched modern Tenere's and BMW's limp along like wet noodles, neither fun to ride nor reliable. We both reckon we'd have struggled a hell of a lot more with pumpkins on this ride, and the ADV bikes wouldn't have made it without super-human effort (and what's the fun in that?)... especially day 4 which is coming soon. Glad you can enjoy the pig while at the office. I won't tell the boss!

    @mbanzi - just for you, a flashback to a slightly more subdued video from the Milgis. You can find the whole thing (which was so far my favorite ride ever because it was 2x as long and we really got out there... in fact, it was the impetus for this ride) HERE
    #14
  15. RedDogAlberta

    RedDogAlberta High Plains Drifter

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2009
    Oddometer:
    19,998
    Location:
    Edmonton, Alberta
    Great stuff!
    #15
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  16. Bike Guy

    Bike Guy Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 20, 2005
    Oddometer:
    847
    Location:
    sierra foothills, hwy 49
    A great RR and with the pics so I know it happened :-)
    #16
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  17. mbanzi

    mbanzi Adventurer

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2014
    Oddometer:
    32
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    WOWZA! Nice save starting at 0:56, how the hell did he get out of that? Had to be the machine that saved him. Thanks for the video, as a result I had to close my office door while I weep quietly in a corner with homesickness. At least we have the desert here in San Diego where I now live!
    #17
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  18. liv2day

    liv2day Is Anyone Here a Marine Biologist! Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Oddometer:
    1,218
    Location:
    Sherwood, Oregon
    Love it! Always look forward to one of your reports @Osadabwa, need to catch up, but had to give this a quote as it's perfect :thumb :nod
    #18
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  19. liv2day

    liv2day Is Anyone Here a Marine Biologist! Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Oddometer:
    1,218
    Location:
    Sherwood, Oregon
    Lots of good pics @Osadabwa, but these are really killer captures. The scenery is amazing, and yeah - that guardrail doesn't look like it would protect much now...lol.

    Great story man, so glad to be reading a report from you.
    #19
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  20. liv2day

    liv2day Is Anyone Here a Marine Biologist! Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Oddometer:
    1,218
    Location:
    Sherwood, Oregon
    ROFL...that's damn funny.

    Woof, that sucks man. I guess it's better that it happened close to camp rather than when you were out ripping through the river bed, but what a crappy thing to have happen on such a great ride. Haven't read the subsequent posts yet, but hope that the break wasn't too bad and that the logistics of getting his bike back home weren't too tough.

    Great pics and write-up thus far :nod :nod :nod
    #20
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