Airhead "Tips and Tricks"

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by elmoreman, Sep 26, 2006.

  1. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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    you might try this with a slide bing but it will not work on a cv crb. the cables do not open the throttle slide.
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  2. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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    Turning the engine with the rotor bolt is not the greatest idea although if you pull the plugs (ALWAYS pull the plugs when turning the engine) it's not a big deal. I would be more concerned with losing the plug and not noticing. This will dump water and crap on the rotor armature and brushes and chew them up. It becomes one more thing to remember to keep an eye on.
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  3. Malindi

    Malindi Zen Adventurer

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    I made sure everything was dry and not oily, then used a piece of 8.5 x 11 from the printer and tore it to size somewhat. I can see where plastic would be too thick.
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  4. Disston

    Disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    May not be something new to many but I've never seen it mentioned. Just finished rebuilding my carbs and took time to make those all important adjustments including the centering of the throttle plate, or butterfly, in the throttle shaft. Have the throttle set screw backed off so the plate will close all the way. And then do the adjusting with the carb top and slide removed. With the top and slide removed it it much easier to move the butterfly by reaching thru the top and throat with fingers. May not be possible to get them perfect or even necessary but mine are now more perfectly centered than ever before.

    Big improvement to have the carbs ultrasonic cleaned. First time for US cleaning for me. Friend has access to Govt $2000 cleaner.
  5. garandman

    garandman Wandering Minstrel

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    Went to the auto parts store to buy NGK BP6ES plugs and they gave me B6ES, which their book says directly replaces it. They look the same. Are they usable in a R90/6.

    Is it worthwhile going to Iridium plugs?
  6. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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    the BPR is likely a resistor plug. Do not use unless your ignition is set up for them

    the BP6 may have been a platinum plug.

    Iridium plugs are good for lightening your wallet, little else.
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  7. garandman

    garandman Wandering Minstrel

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    Like pretty much all owners, I’m unhappy with the amount of effort required to apply the front brake on my R90/6.

    Apparently the master cylinder has a 14mm (9/16”) piston, while some later bikes had a 13mm (1/2”) cylinder that reduced the effort to a manageable level. Anyone done this? I found a shop that Will sleeve the master cylinder and provide new internals for $100-$125. The previous owner put on a new maste cylinder in 2013 and had been barely ridden since, and I’ve adjusted the caliper to work as well as it can.
  8. Disston

    Disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    You are correct that the stock system is totally inadiquit. I have been in the process of converting to a dual Ate front system. I made too big a jump at first. I have both the 40 mm calipers and a handlebar 13 mm MC. This gave too much travel at the lever and so I have to report that a 13 with2 40's is not good (there is a report that this did work but barelly for another rider). I now run a single 40 with the 13 MC. To say it is twice the breaking power of the old system fits my current situation. I think a 13 (or1/2) with the 38 mm caliper you currently have will work just fine. I also run a steel braided line which they say helps. It can't hurt. You could keep an eye out for a 40 which also helps but the change to 13 may be enough. 40's are usualy only sold in pairs but you may find the lone one someday if wanted.
  9. folmonty

    folmonty Older I get, the faster I was Supporter

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    R100GS swingarm to trans boot installation -

    My first experience with this won't soon be forgotten! If I wasn't fortunate enough to own a bike lift it's quite possible a jump from the Golden Gate bridge would be only solution :baldy Might have spent as much time looking / reading for solutions as contorting my fingers around that black rubber condom.

    New boots are surely more difficult than old ones that have taken a set! Word of caution taking the old one off. That old boot might just "fit like a glove" so treat it with TLC! Mine had a crack so it was time to replace.

    One of the most useful ideas I cam across was the use of the air box clips as a way to grasp the
    boot lips. Lubrication also helps some but you don't want too much. Windex seemed to be a good middle ground without being too slippery. View attachment 1673722
    Here's where I completely changed course and rethought how to reach a successful conclusion.

    Do torque the drive shaft first. Do install the swing arm but don't tighten the pivot pins or put any Loctite on the treads. Just put it on finger tight. If you've connected the clutch cable, take it and the pivot arm off to give full access to maneuver the boot.

    Getting the angle of the dangle is critical. The swing arm needs to be parallel to the ground. Especially so with a new boot. I found the best method of holding the swing arm level and stable was using an adjustable strap on the right side.
    View attachment 1673729
    Bungie cords are OK but not as stable. Less wobble the better. Once you have the swing arm supported front and rear, right and left, unbolt the pivot pins. Instead of trying to stretch the boot over the gap to reach the trans, unbolt the swing arm pivot pins so you can bridge the gap and use the extra inch or so to help "PUSH" the boot over the transmission. Pictures are left and right side views. That extra inch makes all the difference! "That's what she said" :getiton
    View attachment 1673733
    View attachment 1673734
    IDK what German engineer designed this thing but they must be getting royalties from selling boots all these years. Hope this helps!
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  10. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    I've read about the difficulties installing this, but when I replaced mine, I basically made sure the boot and clamps were installed in the right direction and orientation. Then I got the swingarm parallel (the shocks were off the bike). Tightened the bolts, used some Windex and a right-angle pick under the lip and as I slid the pick around it popped into place.
  11. MrBob

    MrBob Rabbitbrush Ranger Supporter

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    Pulled into Laramie, WY yesterday evening after a WINDY and chilly ride from Boulder, and when I grabbed the clutch lever, encountered no resistance. Uh oh.
    Made it to a park and began inspecting, discovered the throw out arm was loose. I fiddled with it and got myself back on the road. Last night I watched a few Youtubes on airhead clutch adjustment and I believe I know what to do, once I find a 201mm long object.
    Touring on a 25 year old bike keeps life interesting.
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  12. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

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    Go to a hardware store and buy a wood dowel. Then go to any garage, tell them the problem and ask to lay out a 210 mark on the dowel with their calipers. Back to the hard ware store and try out a fine cut saw to cut off the dowel. Now you have a 210mm gauge. Give the leftover dowel to some kid.
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  13. Disston

    Disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    The measurement is 201 mm as MrBob stated. This distance places the throw out arm almost parallel with the rear cover of the trans. The idea is that the lever is exactly parallel as it passes thru its travel. You can eye ball a good adjustment, knowing this.

    Somebody else said once that they put more than the prescribed amount of free play in the handlebar lever. I do this too. The gap at the handlebar lever is supposed to be about 4 mm, I think. Mine is more like about 10 mm. Just feels better.
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  14. s09rwmb

    s09rwmb I put the 'OLD' in 'Oldschool'

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    combined.jpg
    Some of you will eventually get to a point where the rear main oil seal is staring at you from the back of the engine case. The job you’re about to do is remove the old seal. Some enterprising folks have devised a special tool to do this while others have a variety of involved processes for removing that seal. Using just a pair of pliers, it is possible to remove the rear main oil seal in under a minute. With practice under 10 seconds. Do not pry against the crank. Just twist the pliers as demonstrated in the pictures.
  15. Big Bamboo

    Big Bamboo Aircooled & Sunbaked Supporter

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    Something for the Rub & Buff fans. Found this product "Metallic Lustre, Silver Spark" at the local Ace Hardware. At about $9 for a one ounce tin, it costs roughly half what R&B tubes cost. It has a slightly more liquid texture, too, so it can be almost painted on. On the left is R&B Silver Leaf, which is very bright, almost white. Center is the Silver Spark, more of an aluminum color. Right is the R&B Pewter. These are all the result of two coats that were applied, allowed to dry, and then rubbed with a terrycloth towel. DSCF0160.JPG DSCF0162.JPG
  16. folmonty

    folmonty Older I get, the faster I was Supporter

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    I'm sure you've got good sunglasses Big Bamboo. That's some serious bling. Bet riding the island on an air head is like being in heaven.
  17. Big Bamboo

    Big Bamboo Aircooled & Sunbaked Supporter

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    It does have its moments... 43.jpg
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  18. folmonty

    folmonty Older I get, the faster I was Supporter

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    Kind of what I envisioned, only better!
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  19. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    Very nice.

    Btw, could ask what bars those are?
  20. Big Bamboo

    Big Bamboo Aircooled & Sunbaked Supporter

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    32 71 2 072 200 Sidecar bars 30.5" Vech sells them for $69.95 bars.jpg