Airhead "Tips and Tricks"

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by elmoreman, Sep 26, 2006.

  1. WRC51

    WRC51 Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,433
    Location:
    Santa Rosa, Calif.
    Big B are the Vech bars 22mm? I just bought a set of lower bars but I think they sent the wrong ones and really didn't notice it until they were on the bike. (too late to return). Even the new short cables for these bars are too long, especially the under tank MC cable. Oh well back to the drawing board:D
  2. Big Bamboo

    Big Bamboo Aircooled & Sunbaked Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2010
    Oddometer:
    15,387
    Location:
    Big Island of Hawaii
    I'm pretty sure they are, it is a BMW number, after all. You could call Vech and ask. Those particular bars on my R90/6 were bent while breaking a couple of my ribs, and got tossed...
  3. s09rwmb

    s09rwmb I put the 'OLD' in 'Oldschool'

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2008
    Oddometer:
    14
    Location:
    North Central TEXAS
    24EB337F-5062-4675-B681-A7F0A70F52B1.jpeg Your back will appreciate this work table. Not my original idea - some other genius. My sketch though. It’s what I do. Study the dimensions and modify it to your requirements.
  4. s09rwmb

    s09rwmb I put the 'OLD' in 'Oldschool'

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2008
    Oddometer:
    14
    Location:
    North Central TEXAS
    0C5C6AD5-F97D-4506-BFC9-463D60232DA9.jpeg RS fairing boot installation as I have learned requires clean oil free assembly points - what I call “rails” cast into the fairing that the rubber channels in the boots snap over. The “blind” and “upper center” fairing sections create an opening for the boots and must be fitted in such a way that the seam between them is as flat as can be.
    I warm the rubber just a bit with a heat gun during installation and begin by installing the small radius end of the boot first. Then, I work the sides into position on their respective locking rails until I get the opposite small end radius seated. At this point there is usually a bias - one side is stretched tighter fore and aft than the other that can be felt because the small ends aren’t fully seated - and that condition is what causes the boot to come loose as the fork tubes pull against the webbing.
    The trick is to work the bias out of the boot along the side rail attachments and get the small radius ends seated completely front and back.
    While working the sides one can feel that tension dissipate each time the small ends are pressed home. If tension is inadvertently added to one side, the small radius pops off the rail.
    Many times boots I’ve replaced for others were brittle and torn but the edges were still seated firmly with no glue. Occasionally one will pop out and I just work it back into place as described. Most folks resort to glue or install bellows which do protect the fork tubes. I prefer my fairing factory sealed. When trailering, the boots are easily removed to permit the installation of soft ties.
  5. MrBob

    MrBob Pressure washed insides. Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2005
    Oddometer:
    17,901
    Location:
    Boulder county, Colorado
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Anybody know what this switched terminal is meant for? I’m thinking of wiring a USB port to it to charge my GPS and phone.
  6. Big Bamboo

    Big Bamboo Aircooled & Sunbaked Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2010
    Oddometer:
    15,387
    Location:
    Big Island of Hawaii
    That looks like the wire that went to the emissions control solenoid under the starter cover. There should be a corresponding male connector in the same area. I've just plugged them together, but not sure if that's necessary or beneficial.
    SmittyBlackstone likes this.
  7. MrBob

    MrBob Pressure washed insides. Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2005
    Oddometer:
    17,901
    Location:
    Boulder county, Colorado
    The emissions stuff was removed by a PO, so that could be it.
  8. garandman

    garandman Wandering Minstrel

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2007
    Oddometer:
    7,646
    Location:
    Dorchester, MA / Sunapee, NH
    This is a "DOH!" item but worth mentioning. Rode my R90/6 to a Yankee Beemers breakfast. Went out to take a trip to the American Heritage Museum. No start.

    Duncan of Duncan's Beemers was right there. Told him "It doesn't even crank." He made two observations:

    1. "Four out of five bikes that roll in the driveway have loose battery connections."
    2. "A screwdriver will not get them tight enough: use a 10mm wrench."

    Sure enough, battery leads were loose - and I'd used a screwdriver to tighten them initially.
  9. folmonty

    folmonty twins make perfect moto music Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2002
    Oddometer:
    392
    Location:
    Out West
    Was messing around with cable routing and had to disconnect the clutch cable several times. Found connecting several zip-ties together allowed for easy connection of the barrel fitting on the actuation arm. Not a lot of space to work when exhaust is all connected. 53A5BB3C-4FE3-4EAB-A6BE-7389F562B826.jpeg
  10. garandman

    garandman Wandering Minstrel

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2007
    Oddometer:
    7,646
    Location:
    Dorchester, MA / Sunapee, NH
    While ordering a right side battery cover that flew away (now I know to add a zip tie!) also bought a muffler wrench. Loosened then retightened the nuts and they worked fine.

    Others have recommended removing thrm yearly and applying Nev’r Seize. What say ye?
  11. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,574
    Location:
    West of Seattle . . .
    Yup. loosen regularly!
    R100PDave and SmittyBlackstone like this.
  12. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    May 29, 2012
    Oddometer:
    6,924
    Location:
    Providence, RI
    Considering how easy it is to pull up a picture of someone cutting these off perfectly good engines, I'm not sure how anyone could recommend against yearly maintenance.
    SmittyBlackstone likes this.
  13. Disston

    Disston ShadeTreeExpert

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2009
    Oddometer:
    15,522
    Location:
    Silver Spring, Md
    How tight do you make the exhaust nuts? Beings it is rather impossible to measure this torque it may be impossible to say but I think the manual has a pretty high figure. Don't have the manual here so I can't look it up. I make them tight enough to not leak but not much more than that.
    SmittyBlackstone likes this.
  14. SmittyBlackstone

    SmittyBlackstone Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2015
    Oddometer:
    662
    Location:
    Westchster County, NY
    Copper antiseize. Only.
  15. Disston

    Disston ShadeTreeExpert

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2009
    Oddometer:
    15,522
    Location:
    Silver Spring, Md
    I have been using the Permatex silver anti seize for 50 years. Works fine.
  16. SmittyBlackstone

    SmittyBlackstone Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2015
    Oddometer:
    662
    Location:
    Westchster County, NY
    It is what I use.
    Don't be a d bag
  17. MrBob

    MrBob Pressure washed insides. Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2005
    Oddometer:
    17,901
    Location:
    Boulder county, Colorado

    Edit: Easy, peasy after getting a clear idea of how to make the adjustment using Youtube vids and some reading.
    SmittyBlackstone likes this.
  18. SmittyBlackstone

    SmittyBlackstone Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2015
    Oddometer:
    662
    Location:
    Westchster County, NY
    It was not bad information.
    But I do agree you can use any hi temp antiseize.
    In my experience, the aluminum nut would sometimes still stick to the head.
    I learned that copper antiseize, being of a different metal, would not seize.
    I still loosen them once a year when servicing all of them.
    globalt38 likes this.
  19. Disston

    Disston ShadeTreeExpert

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2009
    Oddometer:
    15,522
    Location:
    Silver Spring, Md
    My neighbor, Milo, has been building cafes and such for a few years. He doesn't only pick on Airheads but has lately begun on them too. So I'm his resident "expert" and lend him tools sometimes. I can't find my rotor removal bolt. So what is the length of a hardened rod, maybe a drill shank, that can be used with the stock rotor holding bolt to remove the rotor? If I was to guess I'd say 30 mm. But maybe 40 mm would be better? See guessing doesn't work for me too well. Anybody know?
  20. beemeruss

    beemeruss Russ Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    78
    Location:
    Edmonton AB Canada
    I read somewhere that one of the studs from a valve cover will work in a pinch for a field repair but have not tried it myself. My special removal bolt has not wandered away yet.
    Cheers, Russ
    SmittyBlackstone likes this.