Alaska 2018 summer

Discussion in 'Americas' started by franki, Jan 31, 2018.

  1. franki

    franki NB Rider

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    I haven't even started to plan my routes. Can I use your routes as a reference? I might from Vancouver take the Rockies route going up and coming down from Alcan.
  2. slane6

    slane6 Been here awhile

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    Sure

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  3. franki

    franki NB Rider

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    Dear All,

    I am in the process of organizing my camping gear form the trip. Since I have no experience of the weather in Canada/Alaska, any recommendations on what kind of gear to bring will be much appreciated.
    1. Will a 3 season tent be adequate between July and August?
    upload_2018-4-10_23-2-44.png
    2. Will a -10C down sleeping bag be warm enough?
    upload_2018-4-10_23-3-39.png
    3. Will a 8cm thick self inflated matt be enough?
    upload_2018-4-10_23-6-8.png

    Thank you in advance for your input.
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  4. Gambito

    Gambito Ecuador Bike Rental by Sleipner Super Supporter

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    Hi Franki,
    its basically about what I took with me to Alaska few years back. Except for the tent. I'm not sure how the wind is like on those months, but the one i brought was a 4 season Vango tent and it proved to be enough to withstand those winds.

    Is it only you in the tent?, if so a three ppl tent works just fine as you can pile your stuff inside and keep it warmer. If the tent is a double wall one, even better.

    Besides that, the usual extras: warm wool socks, head lamp, a good (at least 700) down jacket comfy enough to sleep with, an inflatable pillow is a good choice as well. Mammut does those. And the rest of camping gear: Pans, water boiler, gas cans, spares, solar panel to charge batts, a tablet to watch movies, etc...

    Hope this helps a bit.
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  5. froger

    froger Been here awhile

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    Even in August there's still lots a daylight. One travel book says a green tents better cause the light coming in is not as intrusive. Probably don't matter much. Cant imagine needing a winter tent, a good three season ones enough. I like ones like yours that stand up by themselves. A hunk of old pavement makes for a lot cleaner camp, and with a good pad your fine.

    Seems like a lot of sleeping bag, probably more than you'll need most nights. I'd stay with a warm bag alright, but don't think you need quite that much.
  6. Migolito

    Migolito Prognosticator and MotoYogi

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    No need for a 4 season tent unless you already have one. Plan on rain, so a tent with a larger vesibule is better. Ill be taking a tarp to supplement my smaller vestibule so i have a shelter. 20 deg f bag is fine, no need for a warmer bag. Your pad is fine.
  7. fjmartin

    fjmartin Long timer

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    Make sure your tent has a bathtub type bottom that comes up fairly high in case of bad rain to keep it out of the tent. Your sleeping bag should be fine but if you run into any cold weather the area where you are lying on the sleeping bag gets compressed and it loses a lot of it's thermal insulation at that point so make sure you sleeping pad has a decent R insulation rating as that will keep you a lot warmer. I generally bring along a few packs of chemical hand warmers and if it's extra cold at night I put one of them on my chest and one on my head, held in place by a shirt and cap. That helps a TON! Use dry bags or dry sacks to separate your tent, fly and footprint into their own bags so you don't end up with a soaking wet fly contaminating your tent and getting it all wet. I'd also bring a sleeping mask to help block out the light to help you sleep better.

    Joe
  8. slammer218

    slammer218 Slammer

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    check out the tent space thread for places to stay. There are a lot of people willing to help along the way,Everyone I have stayed with was great and a lot of fun, Check it out
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  9. franki

    franki NB Rider

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    Thanks for the input. I am camping solo and use a 2 person tent. It has a inner tent with a rain fly. That is considered double wall?
  10. franki

    franki NB Rider

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    I am ok with lights and sound when it comes to sleeping. I come from HK. :rofl
    The sleeping bag is a G1000 down bag which has 1kg of down inside. If that is too much, what G (800 or 700) do you recommend?
  11. franki

    franki NB Rider

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    OK, I'll look for a lighter sleeping bag.
  12. franki

    franki NB Rider

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    The sleeping pad has a R rating of 5.0. All other points taken with thanks.
  13. franki

    franki NB Rider

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    Yes, someone also recommended me the tent space link. I'll surely study it later. I also plan to do some wild camping close to a small town.
  14. djroszina

    djroszina Long timer Supporter

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    Weight difference is negligable between down filled sleeping bags. It's the packed size that matters. I would opt for the lowest temp rating down bag that will fit in it's alloted packed space. Most times I just use my bag fully opened as a blanket if its warmer out.

    And yes, what you describe is a double wall tent.
  15. Marcham

    Marcham Been here awhile

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    Yes, but make sure the fly covers the whole tent and the floor is very waterproof. Minimum 2000mm PU coating.

    You can buy Seam Sealer at most camping shops in order to seal the seams of the tent. Even new tents don't always have properly sealed stitches.

    That's a very individual factor and depends on how the sleeping bag is rated. Some are rated -10C as a survival temperature, others rated at -10C as a comfort temperature. In late June last year the temperature did drop down to 0C once in a while.

    Yes, that should be comfortable.

    A small lightweight nylon tarp is great for hanging between trees over the picnic table. Gives you a dry place to eat in the event of light rain.

    Something like this along with some liteweight 2mm paracord cord (nylon or polyester)

    https://www.aliexpress.com/item/3F-...423b25b&transAbTest=ae803_1&priceBeautifyAB=0

    https://www.aliexpress.com/item/IQi...2dd1698&transAbTest=ae803_1&priceBeautifyAB=0

    Weather can be hot and dry one day, cold and wet the next, it's just part of the adventure. Anything you don't bring and really need you can buy locally, so don't overpack.
  16. Cafeguzzi

    Cafeguzzi Been here awhile

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    i haven't read the entire post yet, still on my first morning coffee...
    anyway, alaska doesn't have to be expensive! california is way more pricey, where state park campgrounds can go for $45 nowadays.
    i worked as an adventure and hiking guide for several years up in AK, YU, NWT and BC, so i know what i'm talking about.
    with 3 friends i did a mc trip from san francisco to prudhoe bay and back a few years ago. 4 weeks on the road, we stayed only twice in a hotel due to having being soaked for too long. the biggest single expense was the ferry trip back from skagway to bellingham via the inside passage.
    you can check out the trip on http://cafeborealmoto.blogspot.com/
    for detailed info re campgrounds, roadhouses, roads and routes, attractions, etc., get the MilePost, for many people it's the bible.

    camping: a must! accommodations are only in far and between and, if open at all, very expensive.
    in canada the government CG are very cheap, at least in the provincial parks. usuallly they have a kitchen shelter, where sometimes you can set camp when no one else is around. don't worry too much about bears, just be diligent about proper food storage. bear spray is prohibited in canada.

    eating: cook your own food as eating out is not possible unless you want to spent money AND ride ,sometimes dozen of miles, to the next roadhouse. be warned that many roadhouses are closed as it had been the case in 2011.

    gear: expect to ride and camp in the rain 50% of the time. that's what happened to me in 2011. on the other side (of the alaska range in particular) i experienced stretches of 3 weeks with no precip and temps over 30C in other years.
    if you are a cold sleeper get a sleeping bag with -5 to -10C rating, otherwise 0 to 10C rating. the therm-a-rest ProLite packs smallest, that's why i have it.
    get a tent with a good fly and floor, use a ground tarp (any plastic tarp will do).
    a tarp to tie up to trees as a additional weather protection or just to throw over the bike and gear is a good idea, too.
    i second everything said by Marcham in the post above.
  17. boatpuller

    boatpuller Long timer

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    Uh, no it's not.
  18. Cafeguzzi

    Cafeguzzi Been here awhile

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    ok, to be more specific: back then it was illegal to bring bear spray from the US into canada. that might have changed in the meantime. check with canadian gov websites.
  19. fjmartin

    fjmartin Long timer

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    Bear Spray is LEGAL in Canada. They require minimum size containers and it must be approved by US and CA agencies and must say for animal use only....No pepper spray!

    I just checked the websites to confirm nothing has changed....LEGAL
  20. Marcham

    Marcham Been here awhile

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    Mace, which is stronger, is a prohibited weapon in Canada. Dog and bear defence spray is not.

    Under the criminal code, certain prohibited weapons are listed. In other cases, an object can be defined as a weapon if used in a threatening manner. A car, a bat, a knife could all meet the definition of a weapon if they are used in a dangerous manner against an individual. Some years back the police had tried to prevent Hells Angels regalia to be released from evidence as they argued that the clothing was used to intimidate. (can't remember how that one finished, they probably had to give it all back).

    Carrying bear spray is even recommended is some parks :

    https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/mtn/ours-bears/securite-safety/gaz-spray

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