Alaska Ride – Three Noob Adventure Riders go Far-Far Away to the Dempster

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by rickj, Jul 25, 2015.

  1. rickj

    rickj Been here awhile Supporter

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    UPDATE 2/26/16: Click HERE to see the video of our Alaska ride!

    Why a Ride up to Alaska and Beyond?

    It is unquestionably the quintessential ride-of-a-lifetime that most of us “regular” type riders dream of being able to do – at least once. It’s a ride that’s on all riders’ bucket list. It’s unabashed freedom. It’s man and machine going to a land far-far away. It’s… OK, you get the point - a ride from Southern California all the way to Alaska is really cool! How about going as far as the Arctic Circle? Even better!

    Actually, I rode up to Alaska in 1996 on a 1990 Yamaha FJ1200 as far north as the Arctic Circle on the Dalton north of Fairbanks. It was an amazing ride and one that I think of often. I needed to do it again and started thinking about it and planning for it about 5 years ago. It started to be one of those things that nags at your soul; an itch that just will not go away. I proposed it to my close friends Don and Bob, and it quickly made it to the top of our collective bucket lists. Planning began last fall.

    Meet the Riders
    We’re Rick, Don, and Bob; three Old Fart Riders as we often refer to ourselves. A real estate broker, a pediatrician, and an airline pilot ranging in age from 61 to 63. Adventurers? Certainly. Experienced off-road riders? Not even close. Our dirt experience ranges from zero to very, very little. Roughly a .5 on a scale of 1-10. Why then would we want to take on the Dempster and South Canol Road? After all, we’re primarily sport touring riders. Yeah, we have many years of experience riding motorcycles, but not dirt! I guess we’re late stage adventure rider wanna-be’s.

    How Could We Do This?
    Primarily with the blessings of our wives! Some call it “permission”, but these three adventure wanna-be’s are all fortunate to be married to wonderful women. Women that understand. Keepers.

    About our Rides
    With that most important step out of the way, the next question was that of bikes. I figured that my beloved Yamaha FJR1300 wasn’t really up to the task since we wanted to make this an ADV ride and venture off the asphalt. I initially wanted to keep the FJR and favored the idea of having a “beater-bike” for this trip as well as our moto-camping trips. However, the more I learned about the big Beemer the more I realized that I wanted a late model Adventure model. (The fact that I think it looks like a Klingon spaceship helped.) I found a great deal on a 2012 “Triple Black” GS Adventure with all the options and bought it. I also decided that I’d keep that as my only bike for a few years, so I sold the FJR.

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    Don’s been riding two bikes; a 2012 BMW K1600GTL with an exhaust system on it that makes the big inline-6 sound like a Maserati, and a 2012 BMW R1200GS Rallye. He’s added about every farkle known to man on his GS and truly loves riding that bike! He claims that the GS has soul and so much more character than the K-bike that it quickly became his ride of choice for our local rides, long or short. It’s also a great platform for moto-camping. The obvious choice for this Alaska ride. Don had actually just bought one of the water-cooled GS Adventure bikes, but decided to keep his 2012 for this trip.

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    Bob only recently got back to riding after a 35 year absence! He came out to visit with Marilyn and me several times last year and rented an 1150RT for some local riding. About a year ago he bought a 2002 BMW R1200RT at his home in New Hampshire. With a limited riding season and a good friend with a garage in California, he decided to get another bike to keep at our house. He considered several bikes, but ultimately decided on the R1200GS, which would also be ideal for our trip. He found a well cared for 2007 R1200GS outfitted with Jesse bags and Ohlins shocks. Perfect.

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    Trip Preparations

    In addition to purchasing a bunch of gear for the trip, we went on a few multi-day moto-camping shakedown runs to test out the gear and the bikes. We’d also try to get in some easy off-road riding! Scary. One of these runs was to Death Valley where we rode up to Aquereberry Point and also rode through Titus Canyon. For experienced adventure riders a ride through Titus would be the proverbial walk-in-the park; but it was fairly challenging for adventure wanna-be’s like us with no off-road experience! A great experience though. Unfortunately, I was riding a KTM 990 that I owned briefly instead of my GS, so I had literally no off-road time on the GS when we left, and only about 400 miles on the road!

    We’ve all heard about the California drought, but we were lucky enough to hit heavy rains in Joshua Tree National Park on one of our shakedown rides. It rains very rarely in this desert area but this storm, which extended all the way back home, was perfect timing as we learned much about camping and riding in heavy rain!

    About the Gear
    We all spent a great deal of time trying to figure out the ideal gear for the trip. We already had a lot of camping gear, as we moto-camp in the southwest quite a bit. I’ll provide some reviews of our gear at the end of the trip report.

    Picking the Ideal Date
    From my prior experience and from pouring over data online, I determined that the best time to leave is actually a complete crapshoot. Yeah, you have to do it in the summer, but there are no guarantees that the weather will cooperate. Bottom line is that we’d have to be ready for all types of weather. Work schedules, family commitments, and vacation schedules determined that we’d leave Saturday June 20th.

    We also decided to make this ride a one-way ride so that we could really savor the experience. We’d stop and smell some roses along the way if we saw any, we’d meet locals, we’d drink a beer or two, and we’d take side trips. We’d live up to my motto that says “You Gotta Grind”. We’d live the ride. We’d savor the experience. We’d grind.

    OK, with the wordy prelude out of the way, let’s get in to the ride report. Yes, there will be plenty of pictures, maps, and some stimulating commentary.

    Will these noob adventure riders make it? Will they survive the Dempster? Will they find any roses?

    Stay tuned…
    #1
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  2. OtterChaos

    OtterChaos Guzzi Sud!

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    :lurk
    #2
  3. rickj

    rickj Been here awhile Supporter

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    SUMMARY OF OUR ROUTE

    The Route to Vancouver, BC
    We can ride the US west coast states any time, so our plan was to ride through California, Oregon, and Washington as quickly as possible to get within striking range of the “good” roads. We’re primarily sport-touring riders (maybe real ADV riders some day) and avoid riding slab whenever possible. However, we were willing to endure the pain of endless miles on the I-5 freeway to accomplish our goal of reaching Vancouver within 2.5 days. We hoped to get in to Vancouver early so that we could explore the downtown area.

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    The Route Through British Columbia
    Once in British Columbia, we slowed the pace down considerably to enjoy the scenery of this amazing area of Canada. One of the decisions we had to make early on in the planning phase was whether we could ride the Alaska Highway (highway 97) or the Stewart-Cassiar Highway (highways 16 & 37) once we reached Prince George. I had already ridden the Alcan in 1996 and had read great things about the Stewart –Cassiar, so I convinced Don and Bob on that route. We also wanted to visit Hyder, AK and see the Salmon Glacier, which is nearby. This turned out to be a great decision, and the Stewart-Cassiar Highway quickly shot up to one of my top 5 highways!

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    Riding the Yukon Territory
    Ultimately, we were traversing British Columbia to reach the Yukon Territory so that we could enjoy its many splendors. These included riding South Canol Road, the Dempster Highway to Eagle Plains and the Arctic Circle, the Top-of-the-World Highway, and visiting Dawson City. We were both excited and a bit nervous about venturing off the tarmac to South Canol Road, the Dempster, and the Top-of-the-World Highways. We had considered Telegraph Creek, but opted to skip it due to weather concerns. There were many adventures to be had in the Yukon!

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    Our Alaska Route
    Alaska was our ultimate destination and we were not disappointed. Rather than riding the Alcan from Tok up to Fairbanks and then riding back down to Anchorage on the Parks Highway (highway A3) through Denali National Park, we opted to go to Valdez through Thompson Pass. From there we’d take a ferry ride to Whittier and ride down the Kenai Peninsula before completing the trip in Anchorage. Our original goal was to ride as far as Homer before returning to Anchorage, but we ended up going to Seward instead. More on that in the daily reports.

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    Daily ride reports coming soon…
    #3
  4. Zencyl

    Zencyl Been here awhile

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    :lurk:lurk:lurk

    I love these reports, riding to Alaska is on my bucket list. Hope one day to have to time and money to do it.
    #4
  5. Padaca14

    Padaca14 Someday Adventurer

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    Yep, my bucketlist too. only 8 years till retirement and I'm headed that way too. Can't wait to read your report
    #5
  6. moralem

    moralem Been here awhile

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    I like the detail already.......as an Alaska addict, but having done it only once, I just can't get enough of these stories......quick fixes but still itching for another. Love the bikes you selected and a GS is my next bike of choice when I relapse and head back up there. My brother and I did the trip last summer, he started from down your way over in San Clemente and I started from Dallas.....both on RTs.
    #6
  7. rickj

    rickj Been here awhile Supporter

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    Day 1 – SoCal to Woodson Bridge RV Park, Corning, CA

    Finally! The trip we had been planning for close to a year is here. Well, sort of. We all knew that the “real” trip was starting once we reached Vancouver, BC so our expectations weren’t that high for our first few days day. Much less our first day crossing through that maze of freeways in Los Angeles! I’ll happily ride an extra 100 or 200 miles to avoid riding through LA!

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    Back to the ride report, we needed to get through LA before the traffic got too heavy and opted to leave around 4:00AM. We actually enjoy real early morning rides and do them frequently, especially if there’s a compelling reason. Well, we actually had two reasons; traffic and high temperatures! Don lives in the Dana Point area south of Los Angeles along the coast, so we selected a meeting point directly in the heart of the Los Angeles basin! We moved up our meeting point in Los Angeles by about an hour.

    It seemed that Bob and I had just finished up with our last minute preparations on the bikes when it was time to get up and leave! No problem though, as the supply of adrenaline was high and we were so excited to finally be on the way to Alaska.

    We met up with Don, and he did a great job of leading us out of LA and we were soon over the grapevine and heading down in to the desert valley. A long and boring trudge up the I-5 freeway was ahead of us, so we stopped for breakfast at an IHOP about 7:00 AM with some 200 miles on the clock already!

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    We made great progress on our trek northward and quickly knocked out the remaining 400 miles. I had only been able to ride the big Beemer a couple of times before leaving and wasn’t sure how it would handle the high speed freeway riding, but it did great. Very comfortable at 80 and inexplicably smooth. How can a big twin be so smooth? Bravo, BMW.

    In planning out the first few days of the trip I had spent countless hours on the Internet searching for camping places along our route that would be cool and preferably have water. A river, a lake, any body of water would do. The place I found was perfect. Just a few miles off the freeway and directly on the Sacramento River! A great start. Our campsite at a place called Woodson Bridge RV Park was nestled in a shaded grove under towering Valley Oak trees. This will do just fine.

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    We set up camp and rode across to the other side of the river where we got some dinner and bought a few beers to bring back to celebrate the day’s ride.

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    I think these two pictures tell the story, so I won’t bore you with any of my own commentary. If you enjoy camping you’ll get it.

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    Campsites don't get much better than this, do they? Actually,they do.
    ** Spoiler alert: Boya Lake **
    #7
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  8. CONKSO

    CONKSO Been here awhile

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    Cool! My little brother and I will be making this trip next summer - I'm in San Diego and he's in Santa Cruz- so following along and taking notes!
    #8
  9. maldos

    maldos Adventurer

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    Wow, great job Rick, I'm reliving the trip once again. The small store across the river provided grilled burgers which were actually quite good despite the contrary feeling I felt upon entry. Think I'll settle back in my lounger with an Alaska Amber Ale and wait for the next entry...:photog
    #9
  10. horseiron1

    horseiron1 Been here awhile

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    #10
  11. RokLobster

    RokLobster Far from sanity

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    #11
  12. docwyte

    docwyte Long timer

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    In for the ride!
    #12
  13. rickj

    rickj Been here awhile Supporter

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    Day 2 – Woodson Bridge RV Park, Corning, CA to Champoeg State Park, St. Paul OR

    Our first day’s ride through LA and the I-5 super-slab was tedious, but we had easily knocked out the 600 miles in time to enjoy our campsite on the Sacramento River. We were making great progress toward our goal of being in Vancouver, BC in 2.5 days.

    For our second day, I had reserved a campsite at Champoeg State Park near Portland, about 550 miles north, which would give us a short 345 mile ride in to downtown Vancouver the following day. Since we were going to continue north on the I-5 interstate, I didn’t have high expectations of a great ride even though Don had told me that it was far more scenic than Southern California.

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    The first order of business was breakfast though. We had noticed some billboards along the freeway in Redding advertising the Black Bear Diner, and since we were hoping to see plenty of bear on this trip, we followed the signs in. We had adopted a habit of having a hearty breakfast each day, generally skipping lunch, and then a great dinner (and drinks).

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    The Black Bear Diner did not disappoint. In fact, I don’t think I’ve ever seen some much meat and calories in a breakfast plate before. We weren’t able to clean our plates – I don’t think one human could eat a complete breakfast there - but we left the diner fully energized and ready to knock down some miles.

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    While I had visions of a boring and relatively straight freeway, it was far from that. In fact, the ride from Redding to Medford, OR was intoxicating!

    Leaving Redding, we were soon riding through the Whiskeytown-Shasta-Trinity National Recreation Area and then continuing through the Shasta National Forest. The view of Shasta Lake’s beautiful sapphire colored water surrounded by mountain peaks was breathtaking. The temperatures were also much cooler than the previous day, which reinforced the fact that we were no longer in Southern California. The freeway then followed the Sacramento River as it zig-zagged its way through scenic canyons and beautiful pine forests, with tall snow capped peaks as the backdrop. Definitely beautiful scenery for this Southern California native.

    We have plenty of video taken along this route, and Don will be creating a video blog of our trip, but we were so spellbound with finally having some scenery and curves that we didn’t stop and take any pictures! We do have one picture of Mount Shasta in the distance taken from a gas station around Medford, OR.

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    We did get an interesting picture of Don leaving his mark during one of our breaks. Hmmm.

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    We arrived at Champoeg State Park in plenty of time to set camp and relax a bit. Our campsite was actually right on the Willamette River, but I was disappointed that the river wasn’t visible from our site. In fact, the river was down the embankment that was behind our site. Even so, it was a nice quiet place.

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    After setting up camp, we rode across some beautiful farmland into a nearby town called Newberg for dinner. Afterwards, we enjoyed some beers, a great fire, and conversation mainly centering on the fact that we’d be in Canada the next day! The "real" ride would start when we left Vancouver, BC but we were enjoying a great ride so far.

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    #13
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  14. rickj

    rickj Been here awhile Supporter

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    Day 3 – Champoeg State Park, OR to Vancouver, BC

    We were excited that we’d be in Canada after the day’s ride and would also be rewarded with a stay in a nice hotel in the downtown area of Vancouver. We’d been riding fairly long days on Interstate 5 to get us in to Canada where we felt the best part of our ride was starting. Since we only had about 350 miles to cover, we were looking forward to getting in to downtown Vancouver in time to enjoy Happy Hour and spend some time exploring the downtown area.

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    Don was so excited to get going that he lifted up his tent and started running north! Actually, it’s just a clever way to clean out the tent before folding it up.

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    After a quick ride back in to Newberg for breakfast we were soon on our way north. By early afternoon we were in line at the border crossing. OK, no jokes about guns or drugs here and just answer the questions! We know the drill. We got through the border without any real issues, but the crossing was not uneventful!

    Of course, we picked the slowest line, so it took many start / stops while we slowly nudged our way up a gentle hill toward the border crossing. I was in the front, followed by Don and then Bob, who snapped this picture, at the back. Notice the reflection of Bob’s very powerful 55 watt PIAA lights on the back of my panniers.

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    Don and I were able to get through without any problems and were each told to drive down the road about ¼ mile to a visitor information center on the US side where we could gather up. We complied, but where was Bob? Had he been detained? Why?

    Turns out his battery was dead and he wasn’t able to start his bike after the interview with the border crossing authorities. He had developed a habit of turning off his bike with the emergency shut-off switch rather than the ignition key, and he frequently (actually, almost always) left the ignition on with his two sets of running lights! It had taken us so long to get up to the booth during which time he was draining his battery!

    Finally, a guy on another adventure bike comes over to us and informs us of Bob’s plight and tells us that Bob had walked his bike across the border and was pushing it the ¼ mile to our position. We ran back to help our frustrated and exhausted friend, and then got out the jumper cables to get his bike going.

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    Traffic into Vancouver was very heavy and reminded me of the freeway system in Los Angeles where it’s often faster to walk than to drive! At one point we got so frustrated waiting in line as the lanes narrowed down to a tunnel entrance that we just pulled off to the side of the freeway and moved ahead!

    The downtown traffic was heavy and progress toward our hotel following Garmina’s voice commands was slow. When we finally arrived at our hotel, there was just enough time to clean up and hit the streets a bit to check out the downtown pubs and restaurants. We were struck by the diverse population, and the number of young and fit folks enjoying the downtown scene.

    We found a quaint restaurant and enjoyed a few beers and dinner. We were finally in British Columbia, and the ride was going to get exciting from here!

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    Tomorrow’s route on the Sea-to- Sky Highway (Highway 99) would take us along the waters of the Howe Sound, snow capped peaks, waterfalls and canyons. Best of all, we're finally going to get a chance to ride lots of twisties as we climb toward Whistler!
    #14
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  15. Kavanagh

    Kavanagh proud advocate of anthropomorphism

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    Welcome to Canada! If you've got some time, go to Granville Island in Vancouver, find yourself some fresh smoked maple salmon jerky. Yes, all of those words in one food. It's good. Trust me. Safe travels!
    #15
  16. kumatae

    kumatae Been here awhile

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    Awesome informative report sir!

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
    #16
  17. rickj

    rickj Been here awhile Supporter

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    I'll definitely try to make it to Granville Island on a future ride for some salmon jerky! I did bring some smoked sockeye salmon home for my wife, but smoked maple sounds great! Living in SoCal we ride around the Southwest states quite a bit, but riding in British Columbia is a real treat for us. In our neck of the woods, riding in Colorado is at the top of my list, and we're planning a ride there next summer. Even so, I'd prefer to ride BC.

    I've read some discussions about the friendly, or not so friendly, attitude of the Canadians toward us American riders. However, I can state that all of my interactions in BC were great and, with the exception of one guy at a border crossing, I was shown a lot of hospitality and good will during the trip.
    #17
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  18. Kavanagh

    Kavanagh proud advocate of anthropomorphism

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    Peace Arch border crossing will get ya! They're just doing their job. Ride safe!
    #18
  19. rickj

    rickj Been here awhile Supporter

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    Day 4 - Vancouver, BC to Kokanee Bay Campground, Lac La Hache, BC

    Our brief stay in downtown Vancouver was enjoyable and relaxing, but we were anxious to finally be able to ride in British Columbia and head to higher ground where we’d find beautiful scenery and twisty roads. Our pace was to be much more relaxed as we only had to ride about 300 miles per day for 3 days to get to Stewart, BC where we planned to cross over in to Hyder, AK. We’d be in Alaska on our 5th day and would also get a chance to check out the Salmon Glacier!

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    However, our first order of business was to get out of the downtown area! Traffic was very heavy as we headed toward Stanley Park and the Lion’s Gate Bridge which crosses the harbor to North Vancouver.

    The road was narrowing as we approached Stanley Park and drivers were competing for position as a lane disappeared. In the lead, and not being a particularly aggressive rider, I inadvertently ended up on a road that took us off our route and dumped us on to a round-about in Stanley Park. We rode around the circle a couple of times looking for signs of how to get back on Highway 99, but there was clearly no way to get back on the highway, so we pulled off the side of the road. The ride wasn’t going too well up to this point!

    A local guy on crotch-rocket, likely on his way to work, stopped and asked us where were going. I responded that we were going to Highway 99 north, and he motioned us to follow him as he headed in to the park. It was actually a beautiful ride through this gorgeous park of manicured lawns, lush landscaping, and huge trees lining the road. Crossing the entire length of the park, he took us back to a ramp leading back on to Highway 99. Before turning on to the highway, he stopped asked where were going, to which I responded “Alaska!” He gave us the thumbs up and disappeared in to the traffic.

    In short order, we crossed through North Vancouver and headed toward Horseshoe Bay and the scenic portion of the highway that meanders along the coastline overlooking the water. To “drive” this highway on Google Maps, click HERE. We stopped several times to take pictures and also turned on our Go Pro cameras to catch the scenery on video. (Video being produced and will be uploaded at a later date.) It was so beautiful that we actually turned around at one point and rode 10 miles or so back toward Vancouver so that we could take it the natural beauty from a different perspective!

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    We reached Whistler about an hour and a half later. The location of Whistler Blackcomb, a world- class ski resort and popular destination for downhill mountain bikers, the town was bustling with vacationers. We stopped at Green Lake on the outskirts of town to take in some of the beauty. (I recalled my first ski trip there when I was learning to ski, and a painful accident which yielded me a cracked scapula and a bruised lung!)

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    If you look closely at the picture below you’ll notice a sea plane taking off. We had watched it taxi in to position and were amazed how quickly it lifted off once it applied power! Bob says that it was likely a turbine powered Beaver.

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    We took some time to check voicemail and to check for text messages. Bob took some time to update his daily blog, which I will provide the URL to at the end of this ride report. Hey, reading this ride report wouldn’t be any fun if you already knew the whole story!

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    A “PECULIAR” INCIDENT

    We were making great time and, as we were approaching the junction to the Cariboo Highway (Highway 97), we realized that we didn’t have any Canadian money! Since we were also getting low on gas and could use some lunch, we decided to go a few mile south on the Cariboo Highway to Cache Creek. Stopping at a Chevron gas station with a built-in A&W Express, we filled up and then parked the bikes to go in and get something for lunch.

    As I walked out I noticed a nice looking late-nineties Honda Valkyrie parked next to my GSA and an older chopped up Harley next to it. The owner of the Valk was sitting on a short wall by our bikes, and the Harley owner was fiddling with his bike. I looked at the Valkyrie guy and commented "Nice looking bike! " He didn’t acknowledge my statement and just stared at my bike for a few moments after which he finally looked up at me and uttered “Your bike is peculiar looking." Really? Had he just said that? A few moments passed and he further offered up “I don’t see that your bike has anything in common with my bike”.

    I contemplated my response. Was he looking for an argument? Did he have an issue with German bikes, or had he actually never seen an adventure bike? Was he aware that the “peculiar” design of my bike would allow me to go off-road, adjust my suspension on the fly, cruise in absolute comfort, and generally outperform his bike in every category?

    I enjoy a lively intellectual debate, especially about motorcycles, and contemplated enlightening him about our hobby and motorcycles in general. How do you respond to a guy that can’t see anything in common with two motorcycles sitting at a gas station on the Cariboo Highway in British Columbia? I decided that this simpleton wasn’t worth engaging, and opted to ignore his statements as I loaded some snacks I had purchased in to my tank bag. The Harley guy, who had meticulously positioned his Skeletor scarf over his face and was letting everyone know he was going to make a grand exit as he let us all hear his bikes straight pipes. Classy. The Valk guy mounted his bike and they (thankfully) wandered off in the opposite direction as our route. I waved them a friendly adieu. (Some details slightly enhanced for humor…)

    Heading north along the Cariboo Highway one of the first towns we went through was 70 Mile House, followed by 93 Mile House, and then 100 Mile House. We contemplated why a country on the metric system would label their towns with a reference to miles. We found it “peculiar”. In fact, after I told Don and Bob about my strange encounter with the Valk guy, we joked around about various peculiar things we had seen and experienced. The Valk guy had inadvertently given us plenty of ammunition to joke about and pass the time.

    (According to Wikipedia the 70 Mile House name is derived from its distance from Lilloet, which was Mile 0 of the Old Cariboo Road. Other examples of towns named by their distance from Lillooet on the Old Cariboo Road are 93 Mile House, 100 Mile House and 150 Mile House.)

    I had reserved a campsite at Kokanee Bay, directly on Lake Lac La Hache between the towns of 114 Mile House and 122 Mile House. Thankfully, our campsite was fairly close to the lake and even had a small stream running next to it. Nice.

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    Beer is often the topic of conversation in the afternoons as we look forward to setting camp. We were stunned to find out that they didn’t have any beer for sale there, so Bob returned 10 miles back to the town of Lac La Hache to buy some before setting camp. Canadians are well for brewing excellent beers, and Bob was happy to try out as many of them as he could. With that crisis over, we went about the business of setting up camp and making dinner.

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    From my previous ride to Alaska, I was aware that the days would be increasingly longer as we headed north. With the exception of the occasional truck that would barrel down the highway nearby, the campsite was very peaceful. I took the following picture at about 10:00 PM and texted it to my wife as I bid her good night. It felt like early evening and was eerily calm.

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    At midnight it was finally dark, but I could see light to the north. I recalled that we were only two days in to summer and that the Dusk-to-Dawson event was going on in Dawson City in the Yukon Territory. We’d miss that great event, but would later spend several days there.

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    #19
    black 8 likes this.
  20. Oldgranolahead

    Oldgranolahead Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2013
    Oddometer:
    10
    Hi Rick,
    Good to see that you are doing the ride report. When you get to the part about being the superhero rescuer of the stranded old man and the Great Mud Ride anything you say will go unchallenged by me. :brow It was good meeting you guys. I enjoyed your company. BTW, the "permanent fix plug" failed about 25 miles out of Dawson on Saturday, the day after our Dempster exit. I limped back in with 3 plugs in the tire and had a replacement tire flown in the next Monday evening. That shale puncture was truly the flat from hell for me. I still bought the Safe Seal package and I will travel with spoons and a tube on my next big trip. LESSON LEARNED!!! Say hi to Don and Bob for me. Here's a pic of my bike at the start of the Dempster.
    Carl
    WP_20150630_001.jpg
    #20
    brokesville, slammer218 and fujian like this.