Alaska to Argentina - N69S54A

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by larshoejberg, Jul 6, 2011.

  1. soph9

    soph9 Would Love to ride ALL the TIME

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,644
    Location:
    Stony Brook. NY
    great to see you both on the road and keep the travel relationship and relationship healthy and strong!:freaky
    #81
  2. NightShadow

    NightShadow Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2011
    Oddometer:
    100
    Location:
    Toronto
    Ride report & pics are great. Glad to see you are back on the road. Hope you 2 can finish the trip together & work things out. Look forward to the rest of the report.
    #82
  3. Chiriqui Charlie

    Chiriqui Charlie Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    441
    Location:
    Panama Highlands
    I've been with you all the way! You have already seen things that most can only dream about. You have had some very good luck, and some bad, but the bad is just a temporary setback.
    I love the pictures! What camera gear do you have, and how are you carrying it?
    #83
  4. larshoejberg

    larshoejberg .

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Oddometer:
    103
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Crossing the border into Mexico at Douglas/Aqua Prieta a small border crossing close to Bisbee. We arrived there at midday and spend 2 hours getting ourselves and our bikes checked in. You need to leave a deposit for the bike of 400 USD + the tourist visa cost 262 USD and Mexican insurance for 58 USD, so quite an expensive day.

    Aqua Prieta

    [​IMG]

    The border patrol staff were polite and efficient. Double checked all our papers, and double checked again. We received a temporary import document for the bikes and they promised us that we will get the 400 USD back again, when we leave Mexico.

    The difference between the US and Mexico was enormous. You immediately step into a different universe. The cars are older - lots of wrecks, the buildings colorful and in need maintenance. You see lots of people walking with heavy bags or bicycling. There are stray dogs everywhere and livestock on the roads.

    From the border town we rode on some long straight roads and later some beautiful winding road through the desert landscape to Moctezuma in Sonorra. The road was in very good condition and there were hardly any cars. 20 miles after the border there was an additional border control, where our import papers were controlled and double checked with the VIN number on the bike. No pictures allowed. Further down the road, there was what looked as local militia with machine guns. They just waived us by.

    Moctezuma was a nice little town with a few hotels. We couldn’t find a place to camp anywhere and went for a nice air conditioned hotel. The hotel owner (Jesus) was extremely nice and spoke very well English. He let us drive the bikes inside, the reception. He told us that there was a wedding in town, and everybody would attend, so restaurants would close early – and we should go to the wedding party. We never found the party, but there was an awesome atmosphere in the town. Music everywhere, a lot of people outside and we enjoyed strolling around town.

    [​IMG]

    Bikes parked in a nice and safe place inside.

    [​IMG]

    Cooking in the hotel room.

    [​IMG]

    Every Mexican town has a nice plaza with a beautiful church.

    [​IMG]


    The following day we headed for the beach at Bahia de Kino. From Moctezuma to Hermesillo we went through beautiful dry mountains with lots of bush and cactus. The road was awesome, but we had to take it easy due to the frequent donkeys, horses and cows. They stand right when you come round a tight corner. And there was fallen rocks everywhere, so we were just cruising nice and easy.

    We stopped for a coffee break at this little cafe. There was a military post on the road, but they didn't allow us to take pictures.

    [​IMG]

    Old style coffee

    [​IMG]

    At lunch we stopped at one of the many taquerias

    [​IMG]

    Uhm!

    [​IMG]

    From Hermosillo we went 80 km on a long straight road to the beach. Not a lot to see except for these enormous cactus. The wind was dry and hot. Forget standing up - the wind burns.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    As we got closer to the temperature dropped a bit which was lovely. In Denmark the sea is always close by so we couldn't wait to see the ocean again after 4 months. Bahia de Kino is a beautiful quiet little beach town with white houses and an amazing beach on Mar De Cortez and we jumped right into the waves and stayed there the rest of the day.

    [​IMG]

    And finally we got the chance to try our new fishing rod. There was plenty of fish jumping but no luck, so once again we enjoyed a freeze dried Mountain House meal.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Don't need no other entertainment than this

    [​IMG]

    The next morning we headed to San Carlos along small straight roads through a large agricultural area. We saw lots of people walking on the remote roads in the sun, carrying heavy luggage and pick-up trucks loaded with people on the back – probably heading for a vegetable field to work. We saw a guy with nothing but plastic bags on his body.

    [​IMG]

    The Mexicans are very religious people and we see a lot of road side alters with fresh flowers and burning candles.

    [​IMG]

    Livestock on the road is pretty scary and they are everywhere.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Finally in San Blas. It's stinking hot and we try to stay hydrated.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    San Carlos was a mixed experience. The Totonaka RV park was very nice, but the beach was dirty and part of the town that we saw wasn’t very interesting. To us it seemed like a place catering for the less affluent American tourist. Lots of signs for dental practices and restaurants serving burgers.

    Fresh picked grapefruit from the threes at the RV park is an awesome breakfast.

    [​IMG]

    We headed for Creel in Copper Canyon. We chose the less traveled road and enjoyed the amazing ride in the mountains with very few cars and few trucks.

    Lunch stop in Rosario was the best so far.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Spend the night in Yecora in a nice and clean hotel and were very pleased with our first vegetable shopping experience: 4 bananas, 1 cucumber, 2 tomatoes, 1 onion, 1 avocado, 2 limes for less than 2 bucks!

    The road from Yecora to Creel was even more amazing. It was newly paved and one continuation of smooth curves op and down the green mountain. Still hardly any cars and the few trucks, were nice to let us pass. They use their left blinker when it's safe to pass them, which is really cool.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    We dared to burn a little bit more of rubber on the sides, but still had to be cautious of the livestock on the road.

    Late afternoon we arrived in Creel, where we waived down a guy on a KLR. It was a young guy Chris from Kansas City who was traveling solo through the 35 UN countries in North and South America. Chris gladly showed us the way to the main street and helped us find a cheap hotel.

    Chris with his KLR.

    [​IMG]

    We managed to negotiate a nice large hotel room down to 300 pesos from 500, and the room was large enough for both bikes and us!

    [​IMG]

    Went for dinner with Chris who’s an extremely intelligent young man, who likes to talk about the world we live in, the universe, our future, our past, free will, destiny, religion and much more. He is from an ultra-religious and conservative family but as a kid, he couldn’t accept that a lot of the information he got in school didn’t fit in with the story he got from the bible. Like how can you explain the existence of dinosaurs more than 60 million years ago if god created the world 6000 years ago. And his experience from traveling, confirmed his skepticism against the rigid beliefs he grew up with. Chris works as a photographer and does portraits of people he meet in all 35 countries. Check out his website and amazing pictures.

    [​IMG]

    Chris joined us for a trip to Batopilas at the bottom of the Copper Canyon. So we headed out for an amazing ride on roads with endless curves and hairpins first on pavement and later on a long windy dirt road. The road was so scary at points that simply I couldn’t stop and make photos. It made me dizzy and scared to look down at the switchbacks below me. I had to keep focusing on the piece of dirt in front of me.

    [​IMG]

    Enjoying the view. We met a group of Mexicans who were working on the road construction. The road to Batopilas will be paved in a few years.

    One of the guys spoke really good English. He had been living in Denver for 16 years, working there, marrying and raising his kids. One day he got a ticket for speeding, and since he didn't have a permit for living in the US he was deported. He was now working here for $150 a week. He was gonna go back over the border in December though. We wished him good luck and cross our fingers that he makes it back to his family. I wonder what would happen if all illegal Mexican were deported. Who would work in the hotels and restaurants. Who would work in the American vegetable and fruit fields for low wages. And a huge market would disappear. These people are also customers in the US economy. They just have no rights and can expect to be deported any day.

    [​IMG]

    On a distance this looks like a nice long flat road. It's not really.

    [​IMG]

    Crossing Batopilas river on a beautiful old bridge.

    [​IMG]

    Batopilas river

    [​IMG]

    Having a break in the shade.

    [​IMG]

    30 km before Batopilas we stopped at a small village La Bufa. Here we met Cherry from Iowa who had lived there the last 20 years. She was running a beautiful little store and served us ice cold cokes and gave us avocado from her garden. The town had only 8 people and she loved it. A Tarahumara indian was watching her shop, and we think it was her boyfriend.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    When we finally arrived in Batopilas we were very surprised to find that it was a relatively large village with lots of people and cars - especially since the only way in and out of the village was the road we came down on. It was hard to believe since the only way in and out of the place was that long windy mountain road we just came down.

    Batopilas is an old silver mining town dating back to 1802. The area has generated more silver than Kongsberg in Norway. It is now a lively town with cool abarrotes ( grocery stores) and a lovely local museum.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    We met a nice dutch couple in Batopilas. They have lived in Mexico for several years and gave us really good advise about places to go. They also told us about another possible other way out of the canyon, rather than going back the same way we came in. We were gonna visit the local museum and get more info on that road.

    [​IMG]

    Every year there’s a ritual of riding the old silver mining trails from Batopilas to Chiuahuahua on horses and mules. It takes them 13 days through rugged terrain.

    Barranca de Cobre is the homeland of the Tarahumara Indians, one of the oldest indigenous indian tribes in North America. When the Spanish conquistadors invaded their territory the Indians moved further into the wilderness of Barranca de Cobre and they still live here. The women wear beautiful colorful long cotton skirts and shirts. The men wear something that looks like a pair of white shorts, but is more a folded piece of fabric and a green shirt. We saw the beautiful Indians walking on the remote roads or sitting in groups in the shade under a tree.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Chis, the photographer, had to stretch to get a picture of the tall viking :)

    [​IMG]

    We decided to camp by the river and found a little spot outside of Batopilas. It seems like there’s children everywhere in Mexico and sure enough within a few minutes, we had a little crowd around us. We cooked a nice tortilla dinner and enjoyed the campfire and Chris’ company.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    After dark the stony riversides got a bit to lively for me. Every stone was a house and the house owner was a spider. Small stone, small spider - large stone , large spider. When you put your headlight on, you would see thousands of small spider eyes shine - eeeeeew! I had weird arachnophobia dreams that night.

    Next day we did some bike maintenance and got fuel.

    [​IMG]

    The place for fuel in Batopilas.

    [​IMG]

    Originally we thought that we also had to turn back and ride the same way out of Copper Canyon, until we heard that you could ride out through the canyon in a south-west direction - even if there's no road on any map. We talked to a man at the local museum in Batopilas and he assured us that even if the road was not on the GPS or any map, it was not a problem. 2 hours of road similar to what we did the day before, 2 hours easy dirt and 4 hours paved road to the coast.

    Chris was going back the same way we came in, so we said goodbye to him in Batopilas.

    Our way out of the canyon turned out to be quite a challenge! The first 8 km to the mission in Saveto was easy.

    The mysterious cathedral in Saveto. Nobody knows who built it, or why.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The following 4 hours was extremely difficult. Worse than any of the riding we ever did. Very steep, tight turns and loose rock and a long stretch was in a riverbed with deep sand. My rear tire had very little pattern left and the weight our luggage didn't help of course - and we were probably heavier loaded than ever. There were no signs, so several times we had to guess if we should take a right or a left. I had a very hard time that first day.

    Crash #1

    [​IMG]

    Crash #2

    [​IMG]

    Here we had to decide to turn left or right. No sign or any indications of where to go. After a little break in the shade Lars decided for left.

    [​IMG]

    Every time we met someone or went past a house, we stopped and asked for directions for Tubares, and how long it would take us to go there, and every time we got the same answer "Todo directo una hora y media". Just go straight for 1,5 hours.

    Crash #4 (forgot to get a picture of crash #3)

    [​IMG]

    Surrounded by amazing scenery.

    [​IMG]

    Crash #5

    [​IMG]

    A local farmer told us (we think) that we had to make a right turn when we got to the river and ride in the river bed. When we reached the river, we did just that, even if there was a road crossing the river. We really wasn't sure if this was right, but we thought that as long as we were by the river we couldn't be too way of. Just when we thought loose rocks were our worst enemy, a new one appeared: Sand!

    Crash #6

    [​IMG]

    I was a beautiful ride on the riverbed, but a little hard to enjoy it in the burning heat and the deep sand. We were getting pretty exhausted from picking up the heavy bike.

    [​IMG]

    Finally Lars showed me a little sympathy and went down with the KLR. I made me feel just a tiny bit better.

    [​IMG]

    Crash #8

    [​IMG]

    After crashing 8 times we were both exhausted and bikes were boiling from going first gear in the sun. Besides we had no idea how long we had to continue in the sand, so we decided to put our tent up on the riverbed and camp for the night.

    [​IMG]

    Of course there's people, donkeys and dogs everywhere in Mexico, and suddenly we hear a "Hola". From the top of the little canyon a man looks down at us. We ask if we can camp there and he says "si, si". He sends his 2 kids down with a bag of peanuts for us. It's Friday evening and I think we were pretty good entertainment for them. 2 weird looking bikers in their river! The kids stayed and played with us. They hunted a iguana with their slingshot, and catched tiny fish and eventually they invited us up for dinner.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    They were such a sweet and smiling family with cute little puppies. They lived in a simple farmers house - more like a shed actually. But mom kept it clean and very nice. They had 40 cows and a vegetable field and fruit trees. They got their water from the river where we camped. (And where a lot of cows were grassing). They were so loving to each other and curious and seemed very intelligent. The boys made me take a lot of photos of them and movies where they tried to count to ten in English. And they laughed so hard, because they never got it right. So a rough day ended in a fantastic way visiting this little family whom we would never have met otherwise.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    We later found out that this was our location when we camped in the canyon.

    [​IMG]
    <small>View Larger Map</small>

    The riding the following day started equally hard as the day before. Already within the first half hour I went down twice and eventually broke my clutch lever.

    Day 2 - crash #1

    [​IMG]

    Day 2 - crash #2

    [​IMG]

    Luckily I carried a spare clutch lever. We fixed it in a small pueblo with a lot of young people with machine guns - a bit weird! They were all nice to us though.

    Fixing the damage: bend gear lever, broken clutch lever and windscreen was coming of.

    [​IMG]

    After 4 hours the road got wider and less steep. But it was sandy and we could only go in second gear for what seemed like forever. We met several military platoons on the way, but they weren't interested in us. Just smiled and waived. Every time we climbed up a canyon, we thought it was the last one, but then it just went down and down again into a new canyon and then up and up again.

    [​IMG]

    Finally at 5 pm when we finally hit pavement again we were so relieved. It had been 3 days of tiring dirt roads and for sure the hottest and toughest ride we have ever done, but also an incredible experience.
    #84
  5. soph9

    soph9 Would Love to ride ALL the TIME

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,644
    Location:
    Stony Brook. NY
    WOW....I am sure all those crashes there was a lot of cursing but you documented them extremely well. What a challenging few days and you both made it. Love this update! Glad you guys did not get hurt!
    #85
  6. larshoejberg

    larshoejberg .

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Oddometer:
    103
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Haha! Yes, a lot of cursing. But also fun in a weird way. Crashing with 5 miles an hour is not to bad :) And we met a few pick-up trucks up there, so we weren't too afraid to get stranded. (At least that's how I look at it now!)

    Henriette
    #86
  7. soph9

    soph9 Would Love to ride ALL the TIME

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,644
    Location:
    Stony Brook. NY
    sounds like you are having fun....:freaky
    #87
  8. larshoejberg

    larshoejberg .

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Oddometer:
    103
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Hi! We are in Oaxaca in the Southern part of Mexico. It's a super nice place. Mexico is awesome. The food is to die for and the people are sweet and smiling. Hard to understand all the "good luck in Mexico" comments and warnings we got before coming here.

    Henriette
    #88
  9. the darth peach

    the darth peach eats crackers in bed

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2006
    Oddometer:
    11,400
    Location:
    N.California
    Still great!
    Loving this ride of yours!

    :clap
    #89
  10. Manolito

    Manolito Patagonia guide

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    236
    Location:
    Argentina
    :freaky
    #90
  11. larshoejberg

    larshoejberg .

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Oddometer:
    103
    Location:
    San Francisco
    When we made it out of Barranca Del Cobre (Copper Canyon) we were both extremely tired. We rode into the nearest city Choix to find a hotel. We went around for a while and asked a few people before we found a place. It looked a somewhat shabby, but the sheets were clean, there was a shower and we could park the bikes in the back yard. I paid 300 pesos cash. We spend the evening in the room doing laundry and washing the layer of dust of our bags.


    At 1 am the guy from the reception was talking loud on the phone just outside our door. I was just about to get up and ask him to keep his voice down, when he knocked hard on our door. I got up and opened. He was still on the phone and the person he talked to insisted we pay him more money. I didn't understand, so he handed me the phone and a guy in the other end repeated what he just said. "Dinero - money". We realized that we had made a mistake by not asking for a receipt but we just kept answering "no comprendo". After a while they gave up and went away. We didn't know what to think of it, and it was really hard to sleep afterwards.


    At 3 am it happened once again. They kept repeating the same thing "Dinero - money". We tried to stay calm and just repeated ourselves. "no comprendo". Same thing, after a while they gave up. At 4 pm it all happened over again. This time Lars got up and was just about to raise his voice, but he managed to keep cool and the guy finally went away. But by then I could forget to get any sleep, I was so scared. Lars was never afraid. He didn't think the guy had a threatening body language and he was probably right, so he just went back to sleep. I had a complete horror movie running through my head, including stolen motorcycles, drug gangs with machine guns, corrupt police, us on the street with absolutely nothing and no where to go.


    But nothing of all that happened. They were probably playing a scare scam on us. Don't think they were ever prepared to do anything serious. The guy in the reception pretended that he was nice, but that he was being threatened by the guy on the phone. It was all just one big act that played on the overall "Mexico is super dangerous" hype. And they certainly succeeded in scaring me. We got up early and by 6 pm we were out of there. I was furious and could have slapped the guys face when he came out to open the gate for the bikes. And I made a mental note always to get a receipt.

    We quickly left Choix and rode for about an hour. Then we found an awesome breakfast restaurant and the people there were so nice, that we managed to shake of the bad experience of the night.


    [​IMG]


    Boiling hot meat soup, tacos, onion, lime, chili and coffee. Now this is the kind of breakfast you need after a sleepless night in Mexico.


    [​IMG]


    We headed for Las Glorias on the coast. On the way we got a quick oil change in a small motorcycle shop in Los Mochis.


    [​IMG]


    Finally we reached the beach in Las Glorias. There was a wonderful strong wind that kept the temperature down and the water was just amazing. It was a wide hard beach and the Mexicans were out playing with there toys. Las Glorias is a small beach resort with few hotels. We must have hit the place out of season, cause there was practically no people there, except for some locals enjoying the weekend. After 3 days of poor sleep we could finally relax.


    [​IMG]


    On any Sunday!


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    Beside two American sailors, we were the only guests and we had the camp ground entirely for ourselves. The two Americans had had a scary experience on the sea. They were caught in a storm in Mar De Cortez, lost all electricity, their motor broke down and they didn't have any radio contact. They had to keep their sail up in order to maintain some sort of control of the boat. When the storm was over, they had no wind for 4 days and just drifted in the sea. They were so happy that they survived the experience even if the boat was so beaten up, that they left it in the harbor they managed to get in to. And the boat was just 2 weeks old. :cry


    The camp in Las Glorias. It was so hot, but the strong wind cooled us down.
    [​IMG]


    Hot dry wind - perfect weather for drying the laundry!
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    We headed out early next day to make some miles. The scenery changes and got more and more green and lush. The cactus are replaced by palm threes and thick ivy covering threes and bushes. The gophers and squirrels were replaced by bright green iguanas that cleverly sprint over the road with their heads high. South of Mazatlan we moved higher up into beautiful green hills.


    [​IMG]


    Clarabelle cow is out for a jog this morning! We hope she stays put in the side of the road.


    [​IMG]


    Finding good food in Mexico is easy. There's numerous tiny grocery stores and street restaurants in every little village we pass. Local fruit, vegetable and fresh made tacos are cheap and really good.


    [​IMG]


    There's stray dogs everywhere in Mexico. It seems they don't belong to anyone. They just live by the petrol station or at the Plaza. And it's really sad to see that the Mexicans don't treat the dogs very well. We see a lot of terribly skinny dogs with ugly wounds and even broken legs. They are nervous and if you move to quickly they run away. Think they know how a big boot feels. It's sad really. When you give them a little love, they are so social and sweet.


    [​IMG]


    We stopped in Acaponeta a really nice town with lots of shops and activity. The town plaza had an old prominent hotel - probably the place where the powerful politicians and business owner met and made big decision in the old days. Nothing much had happened since then, but we didn't mind. It was clean, cold and the shower had plenty of warm water.


    [​IMG]


    From Acaponeta we head for San Blas. On the way we stop and talk to some local fishermen catching shrimps.


    [​IMG]


    The catch of the day - not too bad!


    [​IMG]


    San Blas has a really nice beach, but the entire town seemed to be pretty run down. As if the town's hey days was in the 90-ties. However we managed to find a fantastic little hotel with a beautiful patio. Everything was so nice and clean and the atmosphere was lovely. Best place so far but also a bit pricy (500 pesos). Once again we find ourselves completely alone in the hotel - and we love it!
    Hotel Posada Del Rey, San Blas


    [​IMG]


    Fishing boats in San Blas, Mexico


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Shrimps everywhere. You can get shrimp salad, shrimp sandwich, shrimp omelet, shrimp tacos, shrimp …..


    [​IMG]


    The old church in San Blas is beautiful - and we love the blue neon crosses.


    [​IMG]


    San Blas is a nice place, BUT it's haunted by tiny innocent looking sand-flies. They bite and it itches terribly!


    [​IMG]


    From San Blas we drove to Guadalajara via Tequila. We ride through thick green vegetation – and see a new kind of wildlife!


    [​IMG]


    Lunchstop in Zacualpan. As most towns there's a beautiful plaza in the center with a church.


    [​IMG]


    Another meal to die for. 4 tacos and 2 cokes: 58 pesos!


    [​IMG]


    Yet another stop at a petrol station. It never hurts to flirt a bit! :)


    [​IMG]


    Another place where we hang out frequently! OXXO is the Mexican 7/11. They are air conditioned and have ice, cold drinks and clean toilets. We're fans!


    [​IMG]


    Beautiful agave fields around Tequila.


    [​IMG]


    Tequila is not just tequila we learned here. We got ourselves a nice bottle of vintage tequila.


    [​IMG]


    Finally in Guadalajara. We were hoping to meet up with the local Roller Derby team: Roller Derby Guadalajara. They invited us to stay with them and come train with them - awesome!


    [​IMG]



    Normally we avoid the big cities – and especially an enormous city like Guadalajara with more than 4 million people. But it was actually not too bad riding in Guadalajara – the GPS is really helpful when riding in a city. And with an invitation from Patricia and her sister Barbara, the founders of Roller Derby Guadalajara, we were definitely going.
    The sisters lives together in a cool apartment right in the center of Guadalajara. We got our own private room and for 3 days they were the best hosts ever. They took dragged us around town to see the cathedral and amazing markets with lots of local specialties.


    Barbara in her apartment.


    [​IMG]



    Pat and Barb's little kitten was the cutest ever and he and Lars became best pals


    [​IMG]



    The furniture manufacturer next door works 24/7 and use most of the street to do their work. Soon our bikes are part of the workshop.


    [​IMG]



    Zatu and her boyfriend Javier took us to the Parque Morelos market that is completely dedicated to Dia de Muertos items. The entire market is one big explosion of colors, materials, shapes, sounds and smells. And most of it is hand-made locally. Not "made in China"


    [​IMG]



    Mexican sugar skulls.


    [​IMG]



    Dia de Muertos is a day where the Mexicans remember and honor their dead family members. They make beautiful colorful alters in their homes with flowers, pictures and sugar skulls with names of the deceased. They make the food and drinks the person loved and put it on the alter or buy miniature figures of like these below. The entire family visit the cemetery and spend the day there, cleaning the graves, fixing, decorating, eating, praying and just hanging out there.


    [​IMG]



    Zatu buys orange marigolds for her alter.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    Ghost riders!


    [​IMG]



    Zatu's Dia de muertos alter.


    [​IMG]



    Mexican contemporary art. Or just the coolest car ever.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    Eh!?


    [​IMG]



    Lots of pearl craft.


    [​IMG]



    Guadalajara cathedral


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    Caña de azúcar y coco. Very decorative!


    [​IMG]



    Fruit we have never seen before in the San Juan de Dios market.


    [​IMG]



    Lars and Zatu (Patricia) eating awesome Mexican dishes in the food market. We especially loved Mole, a sauce of chocolate and chili.


    [​IMG]



    On every corner you ca buy Elote, an awesome snack of boiled corn with sour cream, cheese and chilli.


    [​IMG]



    Hanging out with Barbara & Marcela. They are both fluent in English and we had some really interesting conversations with them about the Mexican society - and Roller Derby of course!


    [​IMG]



    We were surprised to learn that Mexico has more than 10 million indigenous Indians and that there's 62 indigenous languages such as Nahuatl and Yukatek Maya. Every little Indian community has their own craft specialty which they sell at the markets in the larger town and cities. As the natives in the US, the Mexican natives are also among the poorest people in their country.


    [​IMG]



    The Guadalajara Roller Derby team is pretty new and I got the opportunity to do 2 trainings with them Friday and Saturday. They were all really cool and super sweet even if I yelled at them and made them work really hard.
    Barb looks sharp in my CRD T-shirt!


    [​IMG]



    The ladies!


    [​IMG]



    Roller Derby Guadalajara.


    [​IMG]



    We totally fell in love with these wonderful ladies and their beautiful city Guadalajara and could have spend much more time there, but as always, the trip must go on and we head for our next destination Patzcuaro.
    #91
  12. soph9

    soph9 Would Love to ride ALL the TIME

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,644
    Location:
    Stony Brook. NY
    great update...thanks! Oh, and I feel for the dogs!
    #92
  13. larshoejberg

    larshoejberg .

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Oddometer:
    103
    Location:
    San Francisco
    I know, most of them would be much better of dead.

    Henriette
    #93
  14. sonnyboy

    sonnyboy Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Oddometer:
    332
    Location:
    Cape Town,RSA
    Just Magic, thanks for sharing!
    #94
  15. PacJet

    PacJet Global Soul

    Joined:
    May 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    7
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ USA
    Awesome adventure. Ride safe and keep the updates coming. :super
    #95
  16. Dahveed

    Dahveed Sumo Biker!

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Oddometer:
    5,656
    Location:
    North Texas
    The vast majority of the Mexican people are super nice and very open. Like people everywhere, they have their bad people. I feel sorry for all those good people in Mexico that have to live with the violence that their police cannot get under control.

    I have a theory that because the government isn't really capable of helping anyone, everybody helps each other. Here in the US, fewer people help each other because its the government's job to do that (they think).

    I heard of another motorcyclist that stopped on the road in the middle of the night to fill his gas tank from another tank he was carrying. 3 cars passed him as he did this and they all stopped to see if he needed help. Here in the US, maybe 1 car would stop. Perhaps the same in Europe?

    Mexico is lacking some things, but good people isn't one of them.
    #96
  17. hardroadking

    hardroadking Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2007
    Oddometer:
    395
    Location:
    Columbus, OH
    Loving the ride report and pictures. When you left Copper Canyon and took the "una hora Y media" route out, that took 3 days, did you need petro along the way...or was it just slow going, few miles per day therefore little gas used? Any idea how many miles you covered once you left Batopilas to your first oppourtunity to gas up?
    #97
  18. larshoejberg

    larshoejberg .

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Oddometer:
    103
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Hi Tim
    Thx. buddy.
    Regarding the mileage - I wouldn't worry about that. I haven't gone through my trip log, but it wasn't very far.
    Besides, there's a lot of people out there in the middle of nowhere :huh so gas will be within reach (not that i think it'll be necessary).
    If you're planning on going there - do it soon - they're about to pave the road towards Batopilas. It will change the experience completely :(:
    But then again - there's still the way out of there, which probably won't change within the next decade or so - a bit of an adventure :thumb
    /Lars
    #98
  19. Radioman

    Radioman Moto rider Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,427
    Location:
    riding during Covid
    :clap:clap We met up on the road and had a great Pollo Mole just outside Oaxaca!!:clap:clap

    [​IMG]

    Great meeting you and swapping travel stories. Hope to run into you both as I ride into South America!!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #99
  20. Gummitarzan

    Gummitarzan Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2011
    Oddometer:
    30
    Location:
    Malmö - Sweden
    :clap GREAT GREAT GREAT! It´s 5 to 1 and I should go to bed but somehow I feel like mounting my Twinie and join in on the adventure :D

    Cheers, enjoy and ride safe!