All Things Bonneville

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by rider33, Oct 27, 2014.

  1. wetwider

    wetwider Been here awhile

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    What's with the hatred? I offered a quite possible solution that requires little time or money, that I know is worthwhile from years of personal experience with numerous injected engines (as I stated). Do stuck injectors show up on diagnostic equipment? 'Might not want to assume that. I also lamented an increasing general lack of self-sufficiency. That was an brief observation, hardly a rant.

    ZappBranigan & I agree on carbs. I much prefer 'em, found them reliable in 64 years of riding, in SCCA racing, with added perspective from maintaining marine diesels. Especially nice is carbs are often fixable in the field with simple tools the rare times they need it.

    Incidentally, I gave ZappBranigan the brand of my plenty-good bike clock (see above postings).
  2. Don03st

    Don03st Been here awhile

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    Its kinda like all the hate for chain driven bikes. Yes, they will eventually wear out, but what is all the "work" it takes to maintain a chain? I've ridden all over the country with a chain- not that big of a deal. Would a shaft/belt be better, sure.
    Scoozi, wetwider and PeterTrocewicz like this.
  3. snake89

    snake89 Long timer

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    Ive changed a couple of things since I last posted a pic. thumbnail_20210912_154231.jpg
  4. ZappBranigan

    ZappBranigan Still Riding

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    I got rid of my chain-driven Honda 750 in 1985 and didn't ride again until 1990. From 1990 through 2005 I owned nothing but Shaft driven bikes (Honda 550 Nighthawk, Yamaha Virago 1100, Yamaha Maxim 750, and Kawasaki ZN700.) When I got my chain-driven Thunderbird triple in 2005 it felt like a bit of a step back.

    In a perfect world, I'd have nothing but shaft driven bikes, just to avoid the mess and adjustment of a chain.

    However, I have to admit that a chain really isn't that much of a hassle. I probably over-lube mine, which makes a mess on the chain guard and swingarm, but I'm still getting over 20,000 miles on a chain. As far as "adjusting", I never "adjust" the chain anymore. My feeling is that by the time the chain needs to be 'adjusted' I probably need a new back tire anyway. So I just wait until I need a new back tire.

    Nice thing about the Bonnie is that it's VERY easy to work on. Everything on the bike is easy to reach. Having a center stand really helps although it's not 100% necessary. I can pop the bike up on the C-stand and remove the back wheel in about 20 minutes.

    Actually, my only gripe (and it's a minor one) about removing the back wheel is: WHY did they put the silencers right over the axle? They could have offset them a little higher or a little lower and then you would be able to take the wheel off without removing the silencers (mufflers) first. My first Hinckley twin was a Scrambler which of course didn't have this issue since it had the high exhaust.

    And it's not even that removing the silencers is difficult - it's not (it's two bolts: One on the silencer clamp and one on the passenger footpeg.)

    It's just that like so many other aspects of the early Hinckley Bonneville design, it seems like a lazy, sloppy, poorly conceived design (like the seat attachment) that Hinckley did because they were in a hurry and just didn't care.
    Don03st likes this.
  5. maydaymike

    maydaymike Fearless Commuter

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    When I pull my wheel, I remove the two lower shock bolts and let the swingarm droop down. Plenty of room to access the caliper bolts and the axle.
  6. Hookalatch

    Hookalatch Born Under Bad Sign

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    Perhaps that is true for the Bonnevilles with carbs. I would have agreed with you even on my 2018 T120 until it came time to check the valve clearance. Actually once you get to the point where you can remove the valve cover it's a snap. Even changing shims is easy (once you have the correct size). But it was a major PIA to get to that point. Even with the proper pliers to disconnect the fuel line mine almost made me give up before it finally submitted. Numerous other parts must be removed including lots of electrical connections. What ever happened to simple pull apart/push together electrical connectors. Now they are a puzzle figuring out how to get them apart.

    I have the same difficulty removing the rear axle on my bike except 3 bolts for the left muffler. Then there's the caliper. The bike is so front heavy changing the front wheel would present additional problems out on the road. That was the main reason I converted both wheels to tubeless using the Outex tape system. I believe I could remove and replace both wheels 2 times in the amount of time it took to get to the point of removing the valve cover. It will go much faster next time but EASY, it is not.
    HapHazard likes this.
  7. PeterTrocewicz

    PeterTrocewicz Long timer

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    I don't touch the mufflers on my Bonnie for adjusting the chain or pulling the wheel. I find its so much easier to pull the bottom bolts out of the shocks.
  8. Hookalatch

    Hookalatch Born Under Bad Sign

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    I think I will try that next time. Thinking about it, it may also be easier reinstalling the wheel, not having to lift with my feet while I try to get the axle inserted thru the caliper mount and wheel spacers.
    danketchpel likes this.
  9. Philthy64

    Philthy64 Been here awhile

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    I don't have a problem with Mufflers getting in the way Bonnie 6.6.2020.jpg
    :D
  10. PeterTrocewicz

    PeterTrocewicz Long timer

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    Yeah, but I have my views on loud pipes. I'm not going to get drawn into the debate right now though. :hide
    I do like the rest of your setup though.
    Steve516 and Cheshire like this.
  11. Don03st

    Don03st Been here awhile

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    Any dyno numbers with that setup?
  12. ddavidv

    ddavidv The reason we can't have nice things

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    I fired mine up without mufflers once. Sounded like total shit.
  13. 4PawsHacienda

    4PawsHacienda Inadvertent unrepentant wanderer

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    Check the Triumph Owners Forum / RAT. I honestly have no suggestions beyond what you've already tried.
  14. ZappBranigan

    ZappBranigan Still Riding

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    Uh, doesn't the bike need some back pressure in the exhaust? Or is there a muffler inside that straight pipe that just can't be seen.

    Jeebus, I'm already hard of hearing, I'd be totally deaf if I rode that.
  15. Philthy64

    Philthy64 Been here awhile

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    Nah - I have never had it dyno'd. It has a 904kit, FCR's and reground cams, along with upgraded suspension front and rear. The pipes are TT pipes and do have a small baffle in them, although much louder than stock. It has been jetted and tuned for the pipes. I live in rural Western Australia so not as ant-social as it may seem - quite sparsely populated. I understand different strokes for different folks but I love the growl when you get on it and the burble on the overrun.
    It's a fun little bike and I am partial to air cooled and carb's.

    Cheers
    Philthy
  16. Cheshire

    Cheshire Been here awhile

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    A9020DC4-387C-4271-B587-78C09D8F8BD8.jpeg I got a package in the mail today! Took longer than I expected, but I now have a decent rear rack to replace the OEM rear and side racks for future hard cases. One step closer to my first epic ride.
    These are the Hepco & Becker racks. Next step is to modify the bench seat so it will latch, then hopefully ride up to MotoMachines and make sure the cases I want will actually fit on the bike.
  17. wetwider

    wetwider Been here awhile

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    That does look like a good sturdy rack system, Cheshire. 'Wish I had it but being cheap and using soft bags when Bonny-traveling, here's my solution. Don't think they'd be good for hard bags.
    upload_2021-10-30_14-17-27.jpeg
    It's only 1/4" x 1-1/8" aluminum bar stock drilled to pick up a screw at the top securing the grab-handle and the inside end of the passenger peg bolt, both of which are long enough to accommodate the extra 1/4" or thickness of the bar. As usual, I put Permatex never-harden gasket sealer goop on the threads which have stayed-put for eight years and 30k miles. With a slight bend in the bars on each side to clear the rear shocks by 3/8", then secondary bends a at the ends of the bars so they lay flat for the bolts, I've never had an issue with these or my Wolfman bags:
    upload_2021-10-30_14-24-40.jpeg
    If you don't have a rack or grab-handle, p-clamps around the under-seat frame tubes should work. BTW, on trips after this one through British Columbia, I mounted the bags further forward and lower, getting all the weight down & more centered which noticeably helped handling.

    Further helping the handling, loaded or nekkid, was tilting the frame forward by dropping the tripple-clamps down the forks 9/16" and using a 130/90-17 in back, a 90/90-19 front. I put 13" shocks on her after realizing the Hagons she came with were 12". It took awhile to dawn upon me they were short, after realizing I bought the bike (with 2300 miles on her) from a guy maybe 5'5" tall. Here she is now, abet on the center stand, picture crooked (sorry) but clapboards for reverence:
    upload_2021-10-30_14-31-35.jpeg
    With the bike tilted forward, to sit up straighter again with my 2" rise bars, I put a half-inch of 1" o.d. stainless washers under the handle bar posts to raise 'em, which did not require new bolts. All this stuff reduced the effective rake in the forks for quicker steering yet there's no hint of wobble at 90 mph. I rode it back-to-back with a friend's Ducati monster 620 and it was almost as flickable. (No apparent grip lost with the little front tire, but I'll go back to a 100/90 next time.)
    One last photo for the clock fanciers:
    upload_2021-10-30_14-40-23.jpeg
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  18. ZappBranigan

    ZappBranigan Still Riding

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    If you are looking for a rugged side rack for a good price, I have one barely used that I'll sell you. $175 and that includes the "pucks" that you can use for whatever hard bags you want. Cost for everything was around $300 total and as I said, I barely used it:

    https://advrider.com/f/threads/triumph-bonneville-side-racks-happy-trail-su.1520178/

    Which clock is that?
  19. danketchpel

    danketchpel Long timer

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    After messing with maps on quite a few EFI bikes this is my first thought, that map isn't quite right for the setup you have.

    There's a fair chance you can edit it with TuneECU / Tuner Pro if you know what you are doing.
    s.ga.rider likes this.
  20. wetwider

    wetwider Been here awhile

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    All it says anywhere on the clock is "Bike-Watch" but in the bike's log is written a website, <www.Bike-Watch.de>. It looks an awful lot like others I've seen marketed, though the machined collar for the steering head nut may be sorta rare - haven't seen many of those.