An 800's Rebirth/The build of MechanicO

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by FinTec, Dec 12, 2014.

  1. yaycep

    yaycep Been here awhile

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    463
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    Freiburg, Germany
    Stunning job - I'm looking forward to the result..

    Did you make sure that the conductance of the aluminum blocks on the battery poles are similar to that of a 2.5mm copper wire?
  2. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

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    Colorado
    Nice tip Captain, had no idea on that one. Looks like a very well thought out PDM. The PWD option might even be what I needed for my brake light project. However, I already went with a PDM60 from Rowe electronics. Does what I need right now. Very solid and reliable with a great track record.

    I generally agree with you, simpler is better. However, we all crossed that line into electronics (on the 800) with the ECU, CANbus, etc on these bikes. Honestly, these modern PDM are rock solid. No moving parts, solid state. And if something did go wrong, you don't need it to make it home as long as all it is doing is running accessories.

    The general rule in wiring is to up-size the aluminum wires about 30% for equivalent capacity in a copper. In my case the aluminum block maintains about a 10mm thickness throughout. So should be fine.
  3. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2013
    Oddometer:
    457
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    As much as it is not my "Bag Baby", I need to address some of the electrical and electronics for MechanicO. Here is a brief list of what I plan to do:

    Electrical
    • Relocate Battery (done, above)
    • Fix brake light issue with deleted ABS (done above)
    • Remount starter relay
    • Install Series type Regulator/Rectifier
    • Open up main harness and reroute all wiring to work with all relocated items
    Electronic
    • Install AEM wide-band O2 sensor and controller
    • AF-XIED fuel enricher
    • PDM60 solid state power unit
    • Dash mount: Samsung Galaxy S5 Sport, Garmin Monterra, Vapor Dash, AFR gauge

    To get this started here is a gore shot of the main harness opened up so I can start rerouting things. To be honest this was terrifying in that if I snipped one wrong wire I could see the ECU/CANbus freaking out. So I was VERY meticulous in what I did, took notes, took pictures, every now and then try starting the bike, etc. Still makes me nervous to go this far down into the nerve system of MechnicO.

    [​IMG]

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    Now let me hit one topic: * Warning - Rant * Correct wiring procedure. I have seen some shabby wiring done on bikes it is amazing they run. For some reason this is the one spot where a guy will take huge short cuts. I know, I know, it is not sexy or cool to have "well done wiring", but you are asking for issues if you do a poor job. Look at factory wiring, they spend a good amount of time and money making sure it is nice and neat and proper. Ask yourself this: how many bike issues have you seen due to just a bad connection?

    So here is my method for a good, no hassle splicing of wiring:

    First mechanical crimping of the connector. And use the RIGHT size connector and correct crimping tool

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    Then solder the connection. *some say this is not necessary if crimped properly and I would actually agree. However, I like the extra insurance.

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    Then first heat shrink coating

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    Then second heat shrink coating that is a tad longer than first. This creates two separate seals for the connection.

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    Then wrap in some self sealing friction tape

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    I will never have an issues with this connection.

    I do similar for terminals. Here are the main power and starter terminals now for the bike. They where extended about 8" so they could now meet the battery down behind the engine.

    Crimp and solder

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    Then heat shrink

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    These connections will outlast the bike....and me probably.
    highnoonhunter likes this.
  4. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Now to make a new mount for the new Regulator/Rectifier. I would go to far into here, but this is a true series type RR from Roadster Cycles:

    This is model "CE 605 SB". There are a ton of threads here on this conversion and reasons for it but basically you get a beefy RR that turns off the load from the stator instead of dumping the extra current in the form of heat like the stock RR does. This does two things: reduces the wear and tear on your stator and frees up a small amount of power as the stator is now not "pulling" from the engine all the time. Given, we are talking a small amount of power here. I did it mainly to help protect the stator and have a more robust RR over stock. And since i am now running a Lithium battery, I did not want to take the chance of damaging the battery by over charging it. As I understand it (could be wrong here) when a "shunt" type RR (our stock one) fails it can delivery unregulated voltage to the battery. Bad for Lithium battery. But on a series type IF it did fail it cuts all voltage to battery. Yea, you slowing create a dead battery but you don't damage it.

    I have just read quite a few reports on all makes and models of bikes and how their charging system fails, I wanted the most robust, over done charging system I could make.

    So here is a shot of the new RR next to old. One drawback it is much heavier than stock. The RR comes with like 6 feet of wire, here you can see I already cut down the wires, installed a nice WeatherPak plug on the AC side and clean ring terminals on the batter side. Eliminating the the plug that comes witht he stock one. Just another fail point in my opinion.


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    Going to mount it up above the engine on the right side. So mounted up a piece of steel plate on the mill

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    Then cut out a square flange to mount the RR to

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    Then lathed up some tabs for the backside so I can weld them on and drill and tap those and not have nuts to deal with.

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    Here you can see the RR bracket welded up next to the tabs I also made at the same time for the starter relay

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    A shot of MechanicO over by the welder. Note: I always remove the ECU and CANBus controller when I weld on the frame. I hear to are OK to leave in, just ground the welder near weld. But I don't want to take a chance so I always remove them.

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    Here you can see the tabs I welded on the left side for the starter relay

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    And starter relay mounted

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    Now removed the paint on the frame for the RR bracket

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    And weld on the new bracket

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    And now a shot showing the new RR in its new home. Being up tall in and front it will get a lot of air flow which is good.

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    There are a few "spoilers" in this shot if you can spot them :wink:

    Now to the electronics.....
  5. Captain Excellent

    Captain Excellent Stay weird, or you'll be normal like everyone else

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    Spoiler? There's something going on with that rear brake reservoir, and a couple of other connectors I don't recognize there.
    Looking good. Wish I had half your skill and ease with the metalwork. I can think of so many fun things to make and do with that skill set.
  6. Graniteone

    Graniteone 3,2,1...Beer me! Supporter

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    667
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    Golden, Colorado
    Fin,

    Enough with the slow wrenching, get busy and get it buttoned up so we can go ride. No matter what you do it is still going to be a fugly bike. Now giddy up!

    S!
  7. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

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    457
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    Ah, of course, my orange colored friend. I do appreciate you kick'n my in the butt to get MechanicO going. But good things come to those who wait.....and I will be carrying a tow trap, so don't you worry

    So now I need to go into some of the electronics I will be installing. Not too sexy as far as visually, but they all have a place in the increasing the performance of the already great motor and bike. But my goal was to do it in such a away that i would not affect the reliability of the bike. So at anytime, these devices could be un-plugged or just removed and i still worked and made it home.

    The biggest and most affective device was the one that would enrichen the air fuel ratio from stock. It is a known fact these bikes run lean from the factory to 1) pass EPA rules 2) better milage. However, at the sacrifice of snatchy throttle of idle and maximum power. So like a lot of us I looked at the two options for us here: Power Commander (with AutoTune) and the Xi-ed unit. I ended up going with the Xi-ed unit and here is why: I liked the simplicity of it and it seemed to be a non-intrusive way of enriching the AFR. The PC just asked you to disable so much of the stock system and then "force" their tech into it. I have read many reports of using the PC and they always say they helped...."but....". there was always a something it also did they did not like. And I had great conversations with Roger (involved on the develpoment of the Xi-ed) and he was very helpful and convinced MechanicO would love the unit and more importantly would work well with the modified intake we planned to do.

    Along with the Xi-ed was the AEM O2 unit and a small AFR gauge for the bars. Then a PDM60 and a lot of rewiring.

    So here is the wiring diagram I made for all these additions. It also includes how I planned to program the PDM60 for all this

    [​IMG]
  8. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    Colorado
    As I had mentioned before, if you are going to do your own electrical connections, you wanna do them right. The connectors to use are Deutsch Connectors. These are very well designed connectors that are sealed and come in various configurations. from 2 prong to 12 prong capacity. You do need to invest in a few good to to install but it is worth it. These are of the same caliber (if not better) than your stock connectors. Those non-sealed, poorly crimped, crappy plastic connectors you get at X-AutoZone store are terrible. If you like a connection acting up right when you don't want it to, get those.

    Here is a shot of me creating connectors for the PDM60 and the box of various Deutsch connectors and tools. I did not want the PDM60 "hardwired" to the bike. i wanted the ability to remove it at anytime.

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    Here is a closeup up of the wires "plugs/sockets" used with the Deutsch system. Very well designed and easy to install.

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    The final plug installed where you can see the sealing gasket that slips over the back to seal it

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    So here is the final PDM60 done and ready to install. The aluminum plate under the PDM60 is an adapter so it ties into the stock ECU mount point under the seat. I'll have a shot of everything coming up next.

    [​IMG]
  9. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
    457
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    Colorado
    So I needed a spot near the front of the bike to add some more plugs and connectors. I could have just tried to stuff them under the dash area above the steering column with some of the other stock wiring. But that just looks shabby IMHO. So i found this little spot that is perfect. It is a pocket area behind the CANBus (I think that is what this is? Anyone confirm please) controller. It is hidden and protected well from the elements.

    [​IMG]

    However, there was an unused plug boss sticking out of the back of the controller that took up a bunch of room i wanted. Seen here

    [​IMG]

    So I CAREFULLY and GENTLY cut the boss off using my Dremel and a steady hand. Made sure to also keep the heat down and let it cool off every so often. Ended up with this

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    Then cut a small hole in the bottom of the plastic cover

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    Then a shot of all the connectors i added bundled up inside the cavity before I move the controller back into place

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    So all said and done, MechanicO now has a very clean and low profile bunch of new electronics installed. My goal was for someone to look at the bike and not really notice to additions as they would look factory. Here is a final shot of everything installed with connectors

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    The PDM60 is obvious, but just to the right (in picture) of the stock ECU you can see the Xi-ed, and to the left and slightly underneath the ECU is the AEM controller for the O2 sensor. All new wiring has a Deutsch connector on it, covered in corrugated wire cover, and/or taped using factory friction tape. My hope is I never have to go back and repair any of this. I have other things to add next that will keep me occupied!
  10. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2013
    Oddometer:
    457
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    Colorado
    OK back to what I know best, machining. We need to make a new fuel rail and here is why:

    1) I need to move the fuel pressure sensor to another spot other than at the end of the fuel rail. This is part of the new air box/intake system I have designed.

    2) The stock one broke just removing it. Made from a composite/plastic. The inlet nipple on the end broke off as i was removing the rail. Not impressed with the durability. Imagine being way out there in a foreign country at this things breaks? You have problems.

    3) And not a big deal, but still going to mention it: I m moving the inlet to underneath and in the middle between the two injectors. Being a bit of a weeny here but when you feed injectors in a series (first one than the other, like the stock set-up) you can see different pressures at each injector. This can make a difference on the amount of fuel injected by each injector and if their pressure is imbalanced each cylinder might receive different amounts of fuel. Now they might be running "trims" on each injector to compensate for this in the ECU programing. I doubt it though. Also, the fuel inlet is coming in from underneath now, I now have clearance for the upcoming air box design.

    4) The plastic used in the stock one is a great insulator of heat. So any heat in the fuel is not being shed by the fuel rail but held in. I figured using aluminum for the fuel rail will do a better job of dissipating the heat and give me slightly cooler fuel which is of course better for performance and lower ability for detonation and pre-ignition. However, maybe the aluminum will absorb the ambient heat from the engine and I get the opposite affect? I figured this would not happen due to the fact the fual rail is isolated and not bolted directly to the engine. It only touches the injectors, fuel hose, and tabs on the throttle bodies. Not lot of contact on super hot items. I believe it will work for the better and we get gains from the design.

    The first thing I needed to do was measure the stock fuel rail very carefully as there some of the geometry on the rail are very critical. And it is a high pressure device that CANNOT leak flammable liquid while in use. Bad.

    So one measurement I needed was the spacing (center to center) of the two injectors. I used my Bridgeport's DRO and a center finder to getting an accurate reading on this distance

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    What is odd is the distance between the injectors was 98.3mm? I usually find they run round numbers on things like this. But that is what i got so that is what i will run. For the record, I also measured the distance on the ports on the throttle body and got the same number.

    I really needed accurate hole sizes for the injectors themselves. These are only sealed by an O-ring on the injector and you need to get the load on those o-rings just right. I used a pin gauge set to do this. These are steel precision ground pins that come in sizes in increments of .001". When you use a caliper to measure a hole diameter you might get within say .002" -.003" accuracy. But a pin gauge will nail it.

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    Here are some of the components I purchased of the new fuel rail: a ORB-6 Plug, a ORB -4 adapter, and a crimp connector for the fuel hose.

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    So I came up with this design for the fuel rail

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  11. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
    457
    Location:
    Colorado
    As always, we start with a block of aluminum for our fuel rail. Here is the blank next to the stock fuel rail

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    Load up some tools

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    and make the first cuts

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    Now here is a classic change to the part while making it. I had planned to make a first pass machining the general shape as a rough cut, then go back and do a finish pass to make it smooth like in the computer generated drawing. However, after the rough pass the part had this neat "scalloped" look that I really liked. So I stopped the machining after the rough cut and decided to leave it with this look.

    Here I am drilling the long blind hole that feeds fuel to both injectors

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    Here is a close up of that same hole after I threaded it so it can be plugged with a -6 ORB plug.

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    Now we flip the part over and machine the back side with these tools

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    This was a difficult cut. I needed to make some small slots on each side of each injector boss that would allow the stock injector retaining clips to work. I questioned even using these clips as I have made other fuel rails and not used these. But in the end I decided to include them to be safe. So I had to use a small "key way" cutter to do this

    [​IMG]

    So part done and deburred came out like this

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    I will eventually anodize the part. Did take a hit on the weight of the part vs the stock one

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    Not a huge amount in the scheme of things and the strength and performance gained is worth it. I should have no issues with this fuel rail. And we are that much closer to starting the custom air-box coming up.
  12. MTrider16

    MTrider16 Ridin' in MT

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    :thumb:thumb:thumb:drif:drif:drif:bow:bow:bow:thumb:thumb:thumb

    Is that enough emotii?

    David
  13. Wallrat

    Wallrat Been here awhile

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    Orange County, Ca
    While I agree that the CE605SB is the best solution to the 800GS stator issues (I just picked my own up tonight from Roadster), I don't think it's going to help your LiFePO4 battery any. Lithium batts are much more sensitive than an SLA battery to high and low voltage. So overcharging it will create a paperweight just as quickly as letting the voltage drop too low. I've had no luck at all using lithiums on bikes - 2 attempts and both failed at just over a year - right after the warranty ran out of course. The first failure was caused by letting the voltage drop too low. The second I was more careful with but it still suffered and untimely demise. I'm fairly convinced that balancing the cells is the key to success on these since I've used them in RC applications for years, always using a balance charger, and have been rewarded with extremely long life spans. Kind of a pain on a bike IMO and didn't justify the weight loss that I was after on my KTM. Mostly though, I was tired of throwing money away on lithium batteries and didn't want to drop another chunk of change on not only a new battery, but a balancer as well. I ended up building a super capacitor pack for that bike which was significantly lighter than the LiFePO4 and I can run it flat as much as I want without issue - hell it should last more years than I've got left to ride, and I'm only 37. Granted I don't plan on building another for the 800 - different uses for different bikes.
  14. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    That is a thing of beauty Fin.
    I would love to be a fly on the wall when you turn the key, and push start the first time. :freaky:clap
  15. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

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    Colorado
    Wallrat: agree, I am not 100% comfortable/convinced on this new Li battery I am using on MechanicO. I do want to try it and see how it goes with the best intentions and hopes. However, i am also prepared to deal with any issues. I will report on the outcome.

    But this was exactly why I designed the new battery location to still work with the stock battery and size. And also why I spent some time "upgrading" the entire charging system. I do want to eventually put in a volt meter to better monitor the system as well.

    The less weight is soooooo addictive though.......
  16. Wallrat

    Wallrat Been here awhile

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    Orange County, Ca
    I think the battery will be fine so long as you regularly balance it.
  17. Mercury264

    Mercury264 Once you go Triple...

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    My mind is struggling to comprehend the awesomeness of your work :bow
  18. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2013
    Oddometer:
    457
    Location:
    Colorado
    A few random items...

    Remus exhaust just came back form ceramic powder coating. I could not help myself and went with black. I know I will pay with some chipping up front where the front tire spits up rocks, but I could not help it, I just love the look of a black exhaust.

    Reason for ceramic coating:
    • Stainless exhaust just look like crap over time and unless you like to take a wire brush too it all the time, they will always look like brown crap. Ceramic just stays cleaner and is easy to clean off dirt.
    • General heat away from body parts and various engine parts. Keep heat away from the stator area. Another defensive move on my part to keep the charging/battery system rock solid.
    • Performance in two sentences: Cooling gas slows down which lowers velocity and thus less scavenging from cylinder during the exhaust cycle. Ceramic keeps the heat in, gas moves faster, more scavenging from cylinder, thus more performance. The 800 does not seem to have a lot of overlap on the valve cycles so not sure it will be a big help there, but overall faster gas velocity will occur, and I'll take it.

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    So kind of a funny one. Ever since I received the bike, there has always been this one drop of oil on the bottom of the stator cover. I would wipe it off, and a week or so later it was back. I just figured the gasket was bad and it leaked a little oil. I was thinking "how shabby of BMW, 704 miles and it is already leaking". Decided to take a closer look and saw this

    [​IMG]

    This is an impact from the crash bars from the original accident. The AltRider bars have the raised section that was pushed into the case. (I have since ground down that section of the crash bars). Sure enough I took the cover off and saw this on the inside.

    [​IMG]

    Just the smallest of cracks. Enough to leak a drop now and then. So a little TIG welding and sand it down and we have this

    [​IMG]

    I'll probably have the case powder coated down the road, but for now, no leaky.

    Cut the rider pegs off because MechanicO only carries one rider. Period. You better be damn hot and love cleaning bikes for me to weld these back on. Seriously though, I do want the option for a passenger but I do NOT like having the leg grabbers hanging off the side all the time. Quite a few other bike mfg get it and allow you to add and remove the pegs via a simple bolt system. Why BMW cut a corner here, I don't know. I will make them bolt on later..

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    So a classic example of "just buy one". So since I have deleted the SAS system, I did not want to just put a plug on the manifold for the SAS hose on the top of the motor. I planned to machine a bitching aluminum cover with cooling fins and such. This is what I modeled up
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    Then thanks to "wipeout" who told me about an online shop that sells Nuda parts, I was able to just buy a simple plastic cover. Not cool and trick, but if you don't draw the line somewhere, you end up re-machining everything on the bike. Just have to be real sometimes. And I like saying there is a little Husky DNA in MechanicO now

    [​IMG]
    Benduro likes this.
  19. trailertrash

    trailertrash Adventurer

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    Guy, did you buy this thing to work on or ride!?

    ;)
  20. MTrider16

    MTrider16 Ridin' in MT

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    :lurk :wave Come on Finn, keep those posts coming, we are starting to have withdrawal symptoms here.