An 800's Rebirth/The build of MechanicO

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by FinTec, Dec 12, 2014.

  1. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

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    Knowing the diameter of the flywheel and using my CAD program I made a drawing that represents 5 degree hash marks from TDC with +/- 30 degrees before and after TDC. Print it out (making sure printed to scale, holt crap would that be bad otherwise!), then tape to flywheel with TDC smack dab in middle
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    Using my hand engraver and the taped on printout, I engraved on the flywheel the 0 degree mark (TDC) and the corresponding degree marks before and after TDC.
    Then when you look through the view port on the side case you can now see the timing of the engine.
    Later on when we get the motor running this will be VERY important as we need to make sure when we set the timing to say 5 degree BTDC, the timing light will show that.

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    AK650 likes this.
  2. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

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    Next up we need to mount the new Intake Air Temp (IAT) sensor in the air box. If you remember, I had the stock IAT sensor in the same spot. I could have used the stock one actually, but in this case, and talking to the Motec guys, I went with a Bosch combo unit. This sensor is a IAT sensor and a pressure sensor. We'll be able to measure the pressure (or lack of it) in the air box. This makes for some huge gains in tuning in a standalone control system. This all becomes part of the feedback system that is so awesome about fuel injection. The ECU will not care what altitude I am riding at, as long as it can see the pressure value in the air box, it can do the math to supply the right fuel. The stock Bosch ECU did have an atmospheric sensor on the outside of the unit, but that is not as good a reading as the actual air box. More control and more precision in the air box as that is actually what the engine sees and it can do a much better job of calculating volumetric efficiency (remember all that from threads on the intake system, hmmmm?).

    Need a block of aluminum to make a mount for this sucker

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    Mounted in the air box approximately where stock one was before.

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    Ready to go. Oh, just for giggles while I had it out, I checked the weight of the entire air box assembly. Unfortunately I did not have the stock one still to compare. Anyone does, like to see if I am lighter or heavier. My guess is a smidge heavier.

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    AK650, HermanTM, NaMi and 1 other person like this.
  3. zgfiredude

    zgfiredude RMAR

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    Go get'em Fin! This summer, we ride!!
  4. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

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    Rock on zgfiredyde, lets do it!

    Need to make a mounting system for the new Motec ECU. It will go in the same stock location (under my ass) but I want to make sure to use the stock runner mounts. I am a fan of electronics being mounted so they can giggle around like the behind of my first prom date.

    So I took some aluminum bar and machined some adapters for the stock rubber mounts. These will then bolt to an aluminum plate that will have the ECU and wide band controller mounted to. And, yes, also will be running a wide bank O2 sensor because and bike worth a damn should be running a wide band O2 sensor. Ask me and I'll tell you why :y0!

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  5. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

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    Now to mount the Motec PDM15. Just like the ECU, it is going where the stock power controller was located, behind the steering head, inside the frame.

    Dear sweet fancy Moses, for some reason this once turned into a nightmare. Not shown in pics but I think i made 3-4 different mounts for this and I could just not get it right. Eventually I ended up using a cut-down version of the stock plastic case that covers the stock power unit. The key was to also make sure the system was all on rubber dampers.

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    Just a couple of random shots of MechanicO as he slowly comes back together. Man is it nice to work on a bike that is spotless! Everything is squeaky clean.

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  6. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

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    Now comes the heat shield for the PDM15. The stock bikes also has this but it is a plastic piece of crap and I needed to also be able to mount some other stuff to the shield and stock one aint going to cut it,

    Model one up on paper and check for fit

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    Trace onto some aluminum sheet

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    Cut out and bend where needed

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    Even polished it up with some Mothers Aluminum polish to help reflect more heat. Heck, in a pinch I could use it as a rescue mirror. Or to shave with. The mount using stock mounting locations and hareware

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    As I mentioned the shield will also have some connectors and such attached to it down the road once we start wiring.
    zgfiredude and Loutre like this.
  7. Bayner

    Bayner Long timer

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    So, is that just a branded SAS block off, or are you into something truly wonderful? :ricky
  8. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

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    Ha, I wish it was 900cc's of love. Just a Husky SAS block-off plate. Only sissies suck-air.
  9. Bayner

    Bayner Long timer

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    Gotcha.
    Always enjoy following your build updates.
  10. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the kind words Bayner. Glad it is enjoyable.

    Sometimes I am not sure if there is interest in this level of detail on a build? But I do like documenting it using this medium and if it helps others with their build or inspires one to take a chance on a mod, then my job is done!
    LukasM, FireDog45, AK650 and 3 others like this.
  11. Bayner

    Bayner Long timer

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    I suppose there's a pretty limited number of folks who read it for starters.
    Fewer yet who understand just how tough going your own way like this with a build can be, but regardless I'm sure all find it entertaining to see what can be achieved. Probably it's biggest benefit is for the historical record in regards to things like the intake tuning where starting it all again from scratch would take so much more effort (as you well know!) for those who come along after the fact.

    So as long as you feel like posting, we'll keep reading. :freaky
  12. Zoef zoef

    Zoef zoef Long timer

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    It sure is entertaining, please keep the posts coming. I appreciate the amunt of work gong into these posts, so understand your question/thought.
  13. The Maz

    The Maz Clueless and lost

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    I'm always waiting for your most recent updates.
    It's fascinating to watch your build.
  14. Tonythepilot

    Tonythepilot Adventurer

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    Since I have a F800GS this is fascinating. Been following since the beginning and I always look forward to geeking out on your next update. Thank you for sharing!
  15. AntReed

    AntReed Been here awhile

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    I love this thread, it is incredibly inspiring to see that these sorts of things are achievable by a single guy.

    One question Finn, at what point do you start to think “with everything I have changed on the bike maybe I should have just got an engine and built a bike from the ground up!” ??

    Keep it coming
    Ant
  16. Indy Unlimited

    Indy Unlimited Long timer

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    Finn is our resident mad scientist! Every time you think you know something about bikes Finn posts some insanely difficult mod that we all would not think of trying.
  17. Astronaut Jones

    Astronaut Jones Been here awhile

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    Just found this thread and read it non-stop. I applaud your dedication to keep documenting the process. I’ m blown away by your work and ingenuity. Looking forward to more.
  18. LukasM

    LukasM Long timer

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    Hey Finn,

    I have now gone through the entire thread and read every one of your posts from the last couple of years. Super cool to see somebody with your skills and equipment take on a project like this and then document it in such detail for us all to see, I learned a ton from it. Glad that my bits of information helped you get it started with the WP front end way back when, in custom made triple clamps no less!!

    Cheers,
    Lukas
  19. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

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    Ha, now that I re-read my last post I sound kinda whinny! I appreciate the kind words guys and good to hear there is some value to documenting this build for others. Yes, it takes a ton of work to keep this up. And great to hear from you LukasM! Lukas was a big help way back when on this build when I started with the triple-trees. He had some very good insight on their design and I really appreciate that.

    It's interesting, I read a pile of the big ride reports (usually the "in real-time" ones) and all the authors eventually say the same thing, they keep up the ride log as it can can be lonely at times on their travels and the interaction they get here (ADVrider) are a quazi-riding partner. I wonder if you can get that same "partnership" on a long build?

    The fact is, I sold my a company I owned for 25 years a few years ago. However, before I sold, it was bustling with life and action. It was a very energetic environment. After I sold it, I kept the shop and all it's manufacturing capacities and also live now in the same building by myself as I am not married or have kids. I have started another company and I am very busy with that as it is a start-up in a very competitive field. However, 99% of the time I am one guy in a large, spacious, high-capacity shop and it is really quiet here some days. I had Emma (best damn shop dog ever) but she passed away. My point is, not a lot of action here to keep things interesting. But when I read responses here about MechanicO it does make a difference. It juices me up to not only work on MechanicO, but share it. Yea, it feels good to share this. So thanks for interacting.

    I also hope that if anyone has ANY questions here on how I did something, or why, of even they think something I did was lame, please speak up! I enjoy explaining my logic and reasoning to something I make/build/remove/modify/ruin/etc. As a minimum, I would hope people get inspired to customize their own bikes.

    OK, enough self-reflection crap, we need to get back to finishing this big stage in MechanicO's life. You see something special happened to MechanicO with his new "brain" installed and I think you will find it interesting. Or a sign I am losing my brain. And we need to get him out for a big trip. That is also coming up as I hope to do my first ride report in the "Epic Rides" section soon. So back at it!

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    bozmotodual16 and Paulie M like this.
  20. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

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    Art, trust me, way back when the thought crossed my mind. Just start from scratch and do this from the ground up. There are some super-brave soles here that are doing just that in the custom build forum. But I had two reasons for not at the time:
    1. I needed to learn first. Meaning I was (and still am not) a pro bike builder. There is an amazing amount of engineering in the frame design and such. And I know my limitations. But with heavily modifying an existing bike I can learn a bunch and always have piece of mind in the base I am building from.

    2. Second: I want to actually ride the bike! I knew if I started from scratch, I would want to do it right and the best. And I know me, I would pull it off but at a HUGE expense on time. I mean, I would fucking have custom machined valve stems and I would end up making my own bearing for the swing arm or some crazy shit like that. I could spend years building it. And I wanted to ride and have fun now. So living in the Colorado mountains allows me to ride MechanicO all summer and then build onto him in the winters. It has worked out perfect.
    That said, I do have in my head the next bike build. And I would like it to be ground up. Custom frame, speced engine, custom controls, etc. No stops on the technology used or on the custom fabricating. But it might have to be a custom build for someone else as the budget would be huge! Anyone want to commission this dream-bike, let's chat!