An 800's Rebirth/The build of MechanicO

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by FinTec, Dec 12, 2014.

  1. Merlin32

    Merlin32 Been here awhile

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    Ahh i see now. So it looks about the same as stock . I was wondering if you got higher numbers with the new ecu to see if you rendered the new 850 motor a wash. We all know the nuda proved this cassis can handle pretty big numbers. I wonder if the physics on this motor are maxed out.
  2. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

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    Yea, we are not changing displacement, or cams, or adding a turbo, etc. Just optimizing the intake and giving him a proper tune. So correct, we are most likely getting close to the max on the limits of the current stock motor.
  3. spencermarkd

    spencermarkd Been here awhile

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    .... not to be weird or anything, but last night I had a dream where I was hanging out with you, MechanicO, and Gregor Halenda with his nutty airhead. Tried to explain it to my partner when we woke up and she just stared at me with a blank look and said "uhh, cool?"

    How'd he do at the qualifier?
  4. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

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    Good lord, that is a nutty dream! I have them all the time...

    Still on road as writing this from Ely, NV. Just finished doing the NVBDR solo and heading home.
    Qualifier went excellent. Will post full report when I get back. 12 days of crazy riding for MechanicO and I!
    I did cave and started an Instagram account just for rides with MechanicO and I: Fintec33. Not all, but some good shots there. IMG_20190606_073632_485.jpg
    Paulie M, nvklr, mrsdnf and 3 others like this.
  5. Paulie M

    Paulie M Been here awhile Supporter

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    Just went through this whole thread, this is an amazing project that Fin has undertaken! In simple layman's terms... F%#ing awesome!
  6. wilddog

    wilddog Adventurer

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    All caught up. Awesome skills and THANK YOU for sharing the journey. I could not do what you do, but love reading about it!
  7. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

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    Thank you wilddog.

    Good news is it is now snowing in the high country and time to roll MechanicO into the shop and start the latest round of upgrades. But first I do need to wrap up the spring trip to California and the NVBDR.
    spencermarkd likes this.
  8. Cavaleru

    Cavaleru Adventurer

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    such a high level build! very nice documention shared with us!
    reding your post about beeing single with no kids, i makes me sad, having such a nice shop and knowledge not to be shared and pased over to a little Fin..
  9. Bli55

    Bli55 -

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    First of all, I must confess to reading the entire thread (in awe) in pretty much a binge, it was this good!

    A few pieces left me especially flabbergaster, the CNC'd MDF mould for the intakes.....the paraffin, the carbon itself, and then THIS!!!

    Could you give some advise on the above grease (I have exactly the same one and remembered a long-unanswered question from your photo)?

    I have read a few times an opinion that dielectric grease (even judging by the name) COULD worsen the contact of, say, a male and female spade in a connector using very low current, possibly a low voltage signal circuit, something of the ECU/sensor/control wiring nature etc...

    And then in big heavy connectors (such as the standart 6.3 mm spades for example), carrying decent current with full 12V: lights, starter, generator and other bigger stuff is OK since the connectors slide together with such friction as to displace grease and form good metal-on-metal connection.

    SO.... the logic goes that the small delicate connectors are not heavy-duty enough to scrape toghether so hard as to remove 100% of the grease and the even small attenuation of the voltage due to traces of this dielectric can "corrupt" the sensitive signal voltages.

    What do you think of this?

    I figured you'd definitely detect something was off, since.....you know...you just made and tuned a FULL new electical system for your bike!!!!

    PS. An addendum for really good and sealed connectors like yours vs. cheap standart non-sealed ones wrt. cost-benefit of using dielectric grease on them - could you comment on if the protection is worth it or is instead detrimental due to build up of dust and dirt on the grease.

    That's what I found on mine and resorted to put it on pretty much only the rubber seals of good connectors and none on "exposed" contacts.

    Thanks and looking forward to what this year's winter brings!
  10. Strawdog

    Strawdog Strawdog

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    Bli55 we use dielectric grease in aviation, we deal with ARNIC buses, AC/DC , NOR logic and low voltage/amps.. Especially in environments exposed to the elements. I haved used dielectric grease on DC-3 to new business jets as preventive maintenance or part aircraft maintenance procedures with no side effects.
  11. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

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    Bli55: I am NOT an expert at electric connectors and I don't think I could hold my own on a "deep-dive" conversation on using Dielectric Grease (DG). However, I did look at industries such as aviation and motorsports racing and they all used and stood by the use of DG. Heck, even your every day car now has DG in the majority of connectors.

    To me the number one item I am address using it is corrosion. How many bikes have stopped running due to a bad/corroded connector?

    I make sure I apply the grease on two spots of a connector: the contact pics themselves and also the crimping area. The crimping area is where I think people leave out and that is where you have bare exposed wire and it could use that DG to cover it and keep it from corroding. Also DG is a good lube for the connector itself. These Deutsch connectors I use have an excellent sealing rubber ring but it can be VERY tight to undo the connector sometimes. I put a very thin film on that rubber seal and the connectors are much easier to remove.

    I am using DG on all of the small sub-amp connectors as well and have not had an issue. I find it hard to believe the DG would cause issues here as the connector still makes physical contact. Think of how little corrosion it would take to mess with one of those low voltage connections. Just my experience so far. And looks like Strawdog (above) has confirmed use in aviation for low voltage/amps applications. Aviation guys are a tad sensitive to things not working ;)

    Dirt: yes, I have been conscious of that as well, grease can attract dirt. I do two things to keep that at a minimum: I only use sealed connectors. Those crappy Molex ones where you can actually see into the back of the connector and if you put DG there, they would be a dirt magnet. Second, once done making connector, I wipe down the outside with a cleaner so no grease on outside for dirt to stick to and it is not like trying to hold onto a greased pig when disconnecting. I think any dirt you may get in a connector is a small price to pay for the protection DG offers.

    Build updates coming soon as some good upgrades to MechanicO this past winter........
    1994klr250, spencermarkd and kito like this.
  12. kito

    kito Been here awhile

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    Looking forward to the updates. How has the Touratech rear shock held up to hard use ? I’m fitting longer travel WP forks on the front of mine and am looking what to do with the back . The touratech shock looks tempting but a bit on the expensive side
  13. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

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    kito: the Touratech/Tractive rear shock has been fantastic. No issues other than the rear clevis mount stripping (covered earlier in this build thread). Fixed that. I did have to go one more up on the spring rate as when I was fully loaded with gear the rear was bottoming out on the rough stuff.

    No leaks or squeaky sounds and I am at probably 24k miles on it now. I am thinking at end of this season to send in for rebuild and once over. Preventative. Expensive, yes. Worth the cost, yes.

    Excellent on the WP forks. I assume the 4860 series? And I know you are looking at removing the ABS from other thread so you could also take the opportunity to convert front to single large disc. Thought about that?
  14. kito

    kito Been here awhile

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    Yes I’ll definitely be a single front disc even if I stay with the abs as I’m starting my build from a f650gs.
  15. kito

    kito Been here awhile

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    What travel did you end up going with ? Sorry if it’s already been answered
  16. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

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    My front is at 10.6in (270mm). Pretty much max for this bike. The rear is stock 8.5" but I can adjust the static height with the adjustable clevis on the Tractive Shock and I also have the front fork dropped in triple trees as much as possible.
  17. Bli55

    Bli55 -

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    Strawdog and FinTec, thank you for the advice regarding dielectric grease! I will now use it with no fear on any signal or low voltage connector, as long as its a good sealed type and keep the basic original ones clean until they ever need replacements.


    This is a BEAST (BEaST) of a radiator!! I'm in awe, and find coming back to these posts again and again...

    Can you confrim a few things, I'm planning to order a custom rad in the future and using your experience and pointers:

    I'd imagine the maximum cooling efficiency would be achieved when full flow is directed through the radiator and bypass is fully blocked off (at thermostat full opening temperature of course)...

    The thermostat you used is a conventional, not a bypass type, I believe.

    In other words, is there something designed inside the housing that gets closed when the thermostat opens or is the bypass effectively always open?
    If its the latter, what governs how the coolant flow splits inside the radiator side tank, beside the difference in hose diameters?

    Or did you specifically used a certain hose diameter ratio?
  18. kito

    kito Been here awhile

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    Hi I remember you putting an extra nut under the height adjuster to stop the thread stripping. I have just scored a discounted shock with this on it but they didn’t have an extra nut in stock at the uk TT shop so was wondering if you know what size thread it is an I can just order a nut locally.
    Thanks
  19. Bli55

    Bli55 -

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    @FinTec, to add to the above enquiry, could you tell what ID are the coolant hoses - both the main ones and the bypass?

    Thanks!
  20. FinTec

    FinTec Been here awhile

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    Hmmm, still don't know why the software does not let me know when people respond to this thread.

    I'd imagine the maximum cooling efficiency would be achieved when full flow is directed through the radiator and bypass is fully blocked off (at thermostat full opening temperature of course)...

    Correct

    The thermostat you used is a conventional, not a bypass type, I believe.
    In other words, is there something designed inside the housing that gets closed when the thermostat opens or is the bypass effectively always open?


    I use a bypass type actually. It looks like a regular thermostat but has a "poppet" on top. So as the thermostat open the poppet closes the bypass circuit.

    Picture:
    [​IMG]

    If its the latter, what governs how the coolant flow splits inside the radiator side tank, beside the difference in hose diameters?

    I designed and machined a custom housing for the thermostat that is directly mounted to the radiator. This is a direct take-off to the stock radiator that does the same configuration, thermostat housing built into right side radiator tank.
    [​IMG]

    Or did you specifically used a certain hose diameter ratio?
    specifically used a certain hose diameter ratio?

    I used 1" hose for the main radiator feeds and 5/8" for the bypass circuit. The stock BMW radiator hose is 25mm (I believe) so 1" works just fine.

    If you make a custom radiator don't forget it is a split core design and it "pushes" the coolant from the bottom half UP into the top half. Opposite of most cars that dump into top of radiator from engine.
    Other then machine your own thermostat housing you could also go with something I have seen on many motorcycle:
    [​IMG]
    They look something like the above. I would just make sure it is for a twin engine of similar size so proper flow is a given.
    Share what you build when you can!