An Aussie Abroad - (Taking Lucy Home, from Chile to the US)

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Junipertravels, Jul 21, 2019.

  1. Junipertravels

    Junipertravels Adventurer

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    G'day and welcome to my Ride Report! I'm not sure I'm much of a writer, but here goes... :hmmmmm

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    ...so I'm a 30 year old engineer from the Land Downunder, I quit my job, sold all my possessions and bought a motorbike in Chile. And I'm going to ride it to the US, eventually. I love travelling (I mean who doesn't...) and I love motorbikes - combining the two just made sense. A Pan American motorbike journey has been one of my far fetched dreams for a while now, the type my mates often rolled their eyes at

    As I write this I'm sitting inside a Chilean cafe, numb from the cold fingers trying to type on my laptop, watching the rain fall on my new motorbike. I'm struggling to pinpoint the "It all began when" moment to start this blog. There is a string of influences that led up to this. My mountain bike, which gave 14yo me my first taste at freedom, a bike which I would later equip for large interstate camping adventures. The motorbike mum loaned to me when I finished university, kick starting my motorbiking enthusiasm. My uncle who I would frequently visit to for riding adventures - the same Uncle who spends 3 months a year riding his Tracer across Europe. ...I guess my "It all began with" moment was sometime in December last year when, within a few weeks of each other, a handful of friends got engaged

    The subsequent wedding invitations revealed 5 international weddings to attend. Without sufficient annual leave I concluded that quitting and travelling for a year could be a good solution (I mean I am a millennial after all). Shortly after this I discovered the advrider.com website and the Epic Ride Report section. Stories of inmates doing this inspired me and made me consider it, and eventually obsess over it...

    This pretty much explains me...

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    I can clearly remember the precise moment when this trip became a reality. I was at work on my lunch break, scanning the HU classifieds for South American motorbikes. Still in dreaming mode. One of the threads I'd followed had been bumped - Normlas who was selling his beloved 2008 KLR650 had price dropped the bike with remark "Ready made adventure of a lifetime... Come and live the dream." Something in me clicked at these words - I wasn't living my dream sitting here at my desk. I messaged Normlas and received a prompt reply. The bike "Lucy" was still available. She's on Californian plates and her TIP expires at the end of July... Those words egged me on and I committed to buying her right there and then

    Fast forward 3 months and I'd handed in my resignation, sold everything I owned, left Australia, brief layover in Sri Lanka (wedding #1), and have landed in Santiago. It's be a rush since that moment but finally I am here. I've spent the last few days getting some chores done - new tires, sprockets and chain, wired in the GPS mount. I've bought a new top box and some basic spares. Here she is, getting some new shoes and then loaded and ready for the trip to begin :rayof

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    My plan is simple, live day by day whilst riding Lucy back home to the States. There's no set time frame, no itinerary. Just an end goal (And some friends' weddings I'll work out as I go, thankfully the next two are in Mexico)

    Please feel free to shout out any recommendations; cool roads; foods to try; places to see (or avoid)!
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  2. RobBD

    RobBD Been here awhile

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    Watching this - enjoy the ride !
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  3. Juan Cruz

    Juan Cruz Just riding

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    Count me in!

    Safe travels
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  4. gazone

    gazone n00b

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    Congrats Haydon, big adventure so far, now the fun begins, rode on !!
    #4
  5. BoboFPV

    BoboFPV n00b

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    Watching here from Aus bro
    Safe travels
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  6. steved57

    steved57 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Sounds like a great trip - congrats on the adventure - I'll be following along on here
    #6
  7. Normlas

    Normlas Been here awhile

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    Treat her nice and she will look after you, just like she did me !

    Congrats on getting it together and I'll be following along to see how you two get on :beer
    #7
  8. Johnnydarock

    Johnnydarock Been here awhile

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    I met with Arjan (Normlas) when he just bought the bike in Los Angeles and gave him info on Mexico and places south...wow was he a noob. Look me up when you get here if you need a place to stay. Stay safe and I'll be following along.
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  9. XR Valdeez

    XR Valdeez Been here awhile Supporter

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    That's a familiar bike! I rode many miles following that KLR! She did goood for Normlas and I'm sure she'll do good for you! Have fun and go slow!
    #9
  10. Junipertravels

    Junipertravels Adventurer

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    Thanks for the messages of support guys! And definitely will hit you up Johnnydarock when I get to LA

    Would like to add that Vicente from Normlas' ride report also offered me accommodation on top of the storage of Lucy - muy Generoso! I stayed with Vicente for a few nights until I had the bike up and running and then moved to the Nunoa Hostel - very cheap accommodation that offers off street bike parking.

    ..Okay so my time in Santiago went well, with a couple of wet cold days I extended my time here and focused on getting myself set up. I purchased some tools, additional cold clothing and some camping gear (I decided to do this rather than lug my own stuff over). Some advice to anyone reading this who tries to do the same - start with the markets between the metro stations Union Latino Americana and Estacion Central. I found most of the gear I needed here, and it was very reasonably priced, unfortunately this was after I had bought most of my stuff at higher prices from some of the department stores :bluduh .For camping gear I found high quality reasonably priced tents, roll mats etc at the Sodimac Home Centers. Though I didn't like the sleeping bags here - they were bulky synthetic and weren't rated to sub-zero temperatures. So I'm still on the hunt for a sleeping bag.

    My highlight of my time in Santiago - whilst hunting some tasty street food one night I stumbled across an epic rap battle - felt like I was watching a Latin equivalent of 8-Mile:



    Once the wet weather cleared I made for Valparaiso - it's a short ride, enough to test the bike which is now fully loaded. The roads in Chile are in good condition, the mountains are nothing like we have back in Australia. The Andes are newer, sharper mountains - covered in rock and cacti. Was great to finally be on the road, reflecting on the mad months leading up to this



    ...A quick pringles snack stop...
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    Once I reached Valparaiso I headed for Villa Kunterbunt - a recommendation from Normlas. I was welcomed in by my hosts two sons, as Martina and Enzo were away for work. Once I was set up Lucas confessed to me that they had planned a house party in their parents absence... Anyway, some fun times were had...

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    Martina and Enzo returned the next day and were quite aware and totally fine with the previous nights party. Their family home is a 109 year old 3 story timber house. It's a beautiful home, complete with 2 dogs and an unknown number of cats. They run a business coordinating the logistics of travelers who are bringing their own vehicles into Chile, and so have been a trove of knowledge as I prepare my route out of Chile. This has been super handy

    The TIP on my bike expires in a week, so I was looking for a crossing to Argentina that allowed me to change license plates. Unfortunately, it seems the mountain passes may be closed or about to close with the exception of the main crossing to Mendoza - this crossing doesn't allow me to change plates. I think my best bet is to cross here using my Poder and changing the plates at the next border crossing I take. I'll focus on enjoying my time here and make for Los Andes and then Mendoza over the coming days

    Loving Valparaiso, it's a large sprawling bohemian port city, covered in street art. I'm running out of laptop power so will post more on this next time!

    PS. Map of the route:
    Santiago to Valparaiso.PNG
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  11. Junipertravels

    Junipertravels Adventurer

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    Okay so it's been over a week since that last post, time to recap quickly! I ended up spending a full week with Martina and Enzo as we delved into some concerns Enzo had with my TIP. Cannot fault this experience, despite being a little frustrated being held up there for a full week. The hospitality was overwhelming and Enzo had great rapport with the local customs (ESP aduana) which made things easier!

    ...So after finishing up the last post I go back to Martina and Enzo's to find another motorbike in the garage and another overlanding bandit in the kitchen. Dwan is a 25yo Austrian - he'd just finished up a 5 month trip around Chile with this local 250cc. We were able to get 2 nights in together getting up to mischief before we parted ways

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    Lucy and Dwan's local bike. I realised after taking this photo that there are two cats in it! This gives you a good idea of how animal centric this house is - Martina has a huge heart. I say this as I counted at least 6 cats, and I'm sure they were all adopted by default. On a tangent, according to Martina there are still a lot of Family Planning issues in Chile. I won't turn this page political by going into any detail, but let me just say that when a beer costs less than a condom you have a recipe for trouble!

    Anyway, Dwan the Austrian was another great source of information and added plenty of new locations to my GoogleMap Wishlist (which, if anyone ever wants a copy at IM me and I'll send you a link). Dwan and I spent Sunday aimlessly wandering Valparaiso where we found a beer, wine and food expo after an antique market with these gems...

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    Beer and Wine expo provided some new friends - a Senegalese and an American with his Chilean girlfriend invited me back to their place in Vina Del Mar for some Ceviche and a 5 bottles of wine.

    On the whole the week in Valparaiso went quickly. A shout out to Lucas, Martina and Enzo's son. Student chef Lucas frequently included me in his cooking, my favorite was delicious local Rieneta (A Chilean fish)! The frequent visits to the Customs House with Enzo were often accompanied by local insights - how to choose fresh Rieneta at the market, how to navigate the buses, my first Completa (Chilean Hot Dog that's smothered in avocado and served with tomato)

    Some photos of this Bohemian coastal city; complete with old school electric buses and public elevators... Clearly this was an important port before the creation of the Panama Canal...

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  12. Junipertravels

    Junipertravels Adventurer

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    My next post will include my first near-miss on the bike, a feverish night in the mountains, a group of local Harley Riders and my first break down (been a busy few days)

    I'll get that post up tomorrow or Tuesday hopefully, in the meantime enjoy this little clip I made with my new GoPro...

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  13. Junipertravels

    Junipertravels Adventurer

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    Okay so my last night in Valparaiso Dwan and I cooked up a feast (well we bought the food, Lucas did most of the actual cooking haha). Roasted beef ribs with mash potato... Beer and fun times were had, and when I get out of bed in the morning I have a sore throat, aching eyeballs and other symptoms of dreaded man-flu. Being the second last day on my bike's TIP I have to make fore Argentina regardless - I had been trying to get a new TIP with help from Enzo, which helped get some additional supporting documents which made crossing easier, but I couldn't get the extension I'd been aiming for

    Map:
    Valparaiso to PDI.PNG

    So with one day to spare I headed for Chile's main border crossing in the region - Ruta 60. It's amazing to see such variation in landscape within a single ride - starting at sea level the highway rises through arid foothills and rocky terrain, as the path climbs I begin to see the valley which leads to towering snowy white mountains with sharp black rock protruding at angles. In the beginning of the ride I try to avoid the toll roads, this takes me through every single towns main street with loads of stop-start traffic, it's tedious but I mean have spare time and no income. In between two towns I'm winding through a little laneway by myself that's following the train line, lovely green hedges line either side of the lane which happen to block view of the upcoming road. At one point the lane hooks to the right sharply, and immediately after there's a railway crossing (without gates) and a stop sign. There's a car already stopped, likely it's been sitting there a while since I wasn't riding behind anyone. I react just in time with both brakes and lock both wheels up, pulling up within pissing distance of the rear bumper.

    So, my first near miss. Clearly I was too relaxed with the lack of view of the road. In Australia we call ourselves "the nanny state" because every where you drive the road rules restrict you to the point that it's a little frustrating. A speed limit will be the safest maximum speed you can handle in the worst conditions on the worst corner of that road, and in an instance like this blind corner, there would've been warning signs with flashing lights. I think the reliance on being spoon fed safety in Australia hasn't helped me be a better driver, and I remind myself to be more cautious on blind corners

    At this point in the ride I realise my cold symptoms are worsening, my head feels stuffed with wool and my eyes are watering. Sneezing inside a helmet isn't fun, it's a matter of getting the visor up in time before you paint the inside of it. So toll roads win, and I only spend like $3AUS so yeah, was a good decision. I wind the bike up to +100km/h for the first time and Lucy handles it just fine. I make a mental note to check the oil level when I stop for the night (Arjan the champ has left me with some). A little wind but the roads are quiet and in good condition. By mid afternoon I reach the snowline and the temperature drops, suddenly cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey.

    After 40 odd switchbacks the road straightens out and you reach The Tunnel of Christ the Redeemer (quite a dramatic name...) at 3,200m. The tunnel reduced the crossing altitude by 600m and removed 60 odd switchbacks - an alternative route I'd be interested in if it wasn't the middle of winter. The Youtube video from my last post is mostly of the switchbacks from before the tunnel. Anyway, it's 4pm local time when I make it out of Aduana de Argentina - quite a simple and speedy process. And I am beginning to feel seriously ill, could be the sudden altitude combined with a stuffed nose but I have a splitting headache, a feverish temperature and suddenly don't feel like continuing the next hour to Uspatalla. Within about 200m of the Aduana I find an old train station retrofitted into a hikers/backpacker hostel. I have some Argentinian Pesos thankfully from another holiday here, enough for a room and a loaf of bread. Dinner and breakfast covered thanks to a trusty jar of peanut butter I'd picked up along the way

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    The next morning I meet two locals who are spending their vacation living up here selling home made bread to tourists and guiding hiking tours. They were lovely enough to give me some of the ginger and a lemon to make some tea. Absolutely champions!

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    The ramshackle town next to Puente Del Inca:
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    Also at this nights stay was Puente Del Inca (Bridge of the Incans) - a really interesting geological formation. The naturally formed bridge is thought to have been a chunk of mountain debris created by glacial pressure in the last ice age. This chunk of rock was calcified by the mineral rich water coming from the hot springs (see the fluid-like rock), and when the Earth heated up and the Mendoza River was formed it cut the underside of rock chunk forming the natural bridge. The building in the photo is an abandoned early 20th century health spa that used the hot springs to cure illness! Pretty rad little spot! Maybe I should've tried my luck with the ailment curing spring waters, as I spend the next 5 days man-flu stricken! :knary

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  14. Normlas

    Normlas Been here awhile

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    I'm really glad to hear that you made it into Argentina ok, and I'm interested to hear about the details around the border crossing, did you manage to change the plates? Or are you still riding on my old plate?

    do try and organise some insurance for the bike, it is compulsory in Argentina and the police will ask you for it and ticket you if you don't have it, but they don't advertise this openly so you just have to know. It's not expensive, try and get some local help to get it organised, that's what I did and you can actually get insurance that covers the bike for most of South America which is very useful.

    Also, what was the breakdown you mentioned??

    I ended up having a head cold in Uspallata and spent over a week there, just an hour or so East of you, a lovely little town and it has several banks with ATM machines.

    Ride on brother!!
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  15. Junipertravels

    Junipertravels Adventurer

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    Good advice about the insurance thanks brother! I had mixed info, at the border I quizzed a couple of officials who told me it wasn't mandatory but then had the locals here corrected me. Thankfully no police checks yet and I'll try get some insurance online tonight - do you have any recommendations? Especially if you know a company/policy that covers most of SA?

    Re: The Breakdown - it was very minor, I'm halfway through writing another post now which has the details

    Re: Re: Uspallata head cold - must be something about the weather up here? I definitely would've stayed longer if I'd made it all the way to Uspatalla. Looked like a lovely little town. I ended up pushing on to Mendoza. More story telling about to come :type

    EDIT:
    Regarding the plates Arjan, I wasn't able to change them at Mendoza nor at Valparaiso which was a possibility at one stage. So I'm still on your plates, though I have the new TIP in my name not yours which reduces complications. The whole border crossing went quickly and smoothly, I had a letter written at the Aduana in Valparaiso thanks to Enzo. This letter may have smoothed out any potential complications. I think technically I could ride all the way to the US now using your Poder and plates. Though I will be trying to change the plates the next time I border cross. I'm heading North now, towards Salta, at this stage it's likely that I'm going to head for Chile again at one of the northern borders - heading towards San Pedro de Atacama. Fingers crossed I can change the plates here, if not definitely at the Paso De Ollague
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  16. Junipertravels

    Junipertravels Adventurer

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    Alright, so after my 14 hour pit stop next to Puente Del Inca I make for the amazing Ruta 7, hoping the lower altitudes and warmer climates will help my coughing wheezing state. The night before wasn't pleasant for any one I shared a room with but, the super understanding people of Argentina were still all smiles and home made health remedies the next morning (all conveyed using the hand gesture Spanglish dance I'm becoming fairly apt at :wings )

    Map:
    PDI to Mendoza.PNG

    So down the sweeping highway I manage to get below the snow line and find another totally different landscape again - windswept gravel plains stretch for miles with rocky peaks sticking through like rocky islands in a gravel sea. Lower again, and the plains give way for sharp rock ravines, red stone and sandy. Looks like a scene from the original Star Wars. Unfortunately my GoPro is flat and I decide not to stop in case some Sand People grab me in my weakened state

    I stop for a quick coffee in Uspatalla, refueled I make for the larger city of Mendoza. I pull up at the township of Potrerillos to gawk at a stunning turquoise lake. This is actually a man made reservoir, created to irrigate the otherwise desert landscapes of Mendoza Province (and the reason why they can have a wine industry). I was just stoked to be away from the snow and the gusting winds at these lower altitudes; gave my first ADV inmate salute

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    I took this photo to try to show the two distinct landscapes as I came down from the Andes
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    So I push through to Mendoza and find a good central hostel with secure parking for my moto through the IO app. My 24 hours of coughing have killed my voice as well as what little Spanish I've mastered, I now completely rely on the Google Translate app as my voice is rasping noises only. (On the upside, what became a week long chest cough and diet of lemon and ginger tea ended up giving me the closest thing to an ab I've ever had. Non plural Ab:- a belly that has some definition around the outside only). So I crash for a siesta until I am rousted awake by a phone call from MAI rider Jose Luis. Jose, a legend of a local rider, spent the last 40 of his 69 years in Sydney, has retired in Mendoza with his 883 Harley Roadster. Despite my lack of voice I'm convinced into going for a spin up to San Martin Parque - a monument to commemorate Argentina freedom from the Spanish. Centered on this Monument is San Martin himself, the Spanish Captain turned revolutionist who helped battle the Spanish in Argentina, Chile and Bolivia. Pretty rad dude San Martin, did some crazy stuff like cross the Andes by horseback to fight in other nations' wars

    (NB: MAI refers to a WhatsApp support group network for adventure motorbike travelers across the Americas)

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    We follow this with a lovely little ride through road worked streets - glad I was on the KLR not a Harley
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    Jose Luis is an inclusive legend of a guy, I find myself at a string of local events including a BBQ at his brother's, a few rides with his mates, and a Harley Club Ride Day...

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    I think most motorbike riders will agree with me, part of why we ride is because you feel a part of something bigger. Might be an "us versus the bitumen" thing, or it's just an understanding that comes from a shared experience. Anyway, why ever it is, it felt great in Mendoza to be a part of so many other group ride days. So last Sunday, I roll into the Shell servo (the above photo), and by the time I had bought fuel, some new spare oil and a chocolate milk (my ride-day beverage of choice) there is half a dozen hogs surrounding my bike. That feeling of being included kicks in and I find myself, the lone Kwacka rider amoungst Hogs and leather clad lads, exchanging the broken Spanglish hand gesture dance. By the time we leave there are about 30 or so riders. We're riding out along Ruta 82 which winds along the Mendoza River and I'm super psyched about - I've been reading up on this road and it sounds amazing

    A few km into the ride, still in Mendoza, disaster strikes. Sudden complete loss of power. I pull up, knowing it's the chain. Yup, chain is gone. Jose Luis pulls up like a bro, and I say adios to my ride along ruta 82. I find the chain 20m back on the road, the link used in the installation is missing. To be fair this is on me, I had a bad feeling when I had a mechanic install this new chain back in Santiago, as lovely as he was I didn't have great confidence in his work, and I had been meaning to do a chain check session. Anyway, adversity leads to adventure and all that jazz. And now I get to have a go at my first clip link repair, I was pretty happy with my first go. I get the bike back to the Hostel courtyard no dramas. Discussions with the MAI brains trust ensue. I want to get a rivet link on to the chain, but I am yet to acquire a jack for the bike which would be super handy for installing a chain without the rear wheel on. So I ask for advice on getting a light weight bike jack on MAI, I show them photos of the single pole prop my predecessor Arjan was using, and local legend Daniel Del MAI offers to make me a replica... :happay I spend the next day hunting for a better mechanic to help me with my chain, and after 3 shops I get to one I'm happy with. Within one day of my breakdown I find myself with a properly installed chain and a custom made bike prop/jack. I may not have gotten to ride Ruta 82 but that feeling of being a part of a larger group is stronger than ever, and I'm super grateful to be on this journey. I know that there are still going to be many challenges ahead, but with experiences like these I know that I will have help in over coming any of them

    The new link:
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    Out of attachment space, next post will have the photos of the custom made bike prop and me Daniel who made this for me...
    #16
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  17. Junipertravels

    Junipertravels Adventurer

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    Chain maintenance just got a whole lot easier:
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    Cheers Daniel Del MAI:
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    My first 'on the side of the road chain repair:
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    #17
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  18. Junipertravels

    Junipertravels Adventurer

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    I was able to piece together some GoPro footage from my time in Mendoza with Jose Luis and his amigos. Have a look, only 30 seconds long...

    #18
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  19. Junipertravels

    Junipertravels Adventurer

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    So before I can leave Mendoza I need to get some insurance - cheers Arjan for clarifying that for me! I make a round of the town and stop into a few brokers. The challenge is that most insurers will only cover an Argentina bike, if you have a local with you it's possible to get a cover note that doesn't show your license plate number. As I am without my local riding gang, and I am keen to hit the road ASAP, I settle for a slightly more expensive insurance that will cover me in Argentina only; Mercantil Andina - 400peso for one month
    Once I arrange the insurance I find out I have to wait until after the siesta before I can get my paperwork! :dirtdog Possibly my only frustration in Argentina is that everyone stops work in the middle of the day! Why? The siesta. It's not a tropical climate, no one needs to go home to have a sleep in the afternoon. In Northern Argentina at the moment it might be sub zero before light, and sunrise is 8.30am... As a rule, my day starts when it's above 10C outside and not before... Anyway, I lost another day to the siesta waiting for my insurance #EndRant

    Map:
    Mendoza to Villa Union.PNG

    When I leave Mendoza I have just enough light left to make for San Juan. The highway on this stretch is flat and straight, and windy. I power through and I stop in at a little backpacker with secure parking. I leave the luggage on Lucy and grab an Empanada dinner from the local corner shop. Nothing in San Juan really takes my fancy so I get an early night's sleep to make the most of tomorrow. Highlight of San Juan was a giant 3kg bucket of Dulce De Leche I was handed for breakfast in the morning! Dulce De Leche is essentially caramel topping, used like jam or Vegemite on toast as a diabetic inducing breakfast. I actually used the stuff in place of honey on my porridge recently and it. was. amazing.

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    So back on Ruta 40 proper in the morning, heading for Huaco. There are two large national parks I am going to go passed today and I can only afford to tour one of them - the only way to see the park is by a fully guided tour and it's pricey (for employed me anyway). The parks, both UNESCO protected, are some of the oldest and most complete Triassic Era formations - 250,000,000 years old. I'm a bit of a rock enthusiast myself and keen to see at least one of the parks. So I head for the town Huaco which is the gateway to the first park - Ischigualasto. It's a very small town and there's limited cheap accommodation, I grab some lunch from a Kiosk and decide on doing this park or heading for the second. Lunch is some dulce de luche pastries that are on special. With a cuppa they go down quickly and I'm about halfway through the tray of sweets when I realise the underside of each sweet is covered in a dark green furry mold... I feel sick :fpalm

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    Anyway, the day is still young and I'm now feeling a little at odds with Huaco, I decide to push through to the second national park - Talampaya

    Some of the rock formations I am riding through are striking, as always photos don't do real justice:

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    I arrive at Villa Union, a township that's only 40min from the entrance to Talampaya. A lap of the town and I can't find a cheap hostel anywhere. There's camping or cabins. I relent and am rewarded with a self sufficient unit for only 350p per night. With my own kitchen, I cook up a storm - bulk pasta which will cover meals for the two nights here. An evening of Harry Potter in Spanish whilst I cook to brush up on my vocab...

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    #19
  20. Junipertravels

    Junipertravels Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2019
    Oddometer:
    12
    Location:
    Australia
    I awake early and head for Talampaya Nacional Parque, grab some more snacks on my way - this time I scrupulously check them for mold. I get into a 4 hour tour group on a Truck to Tour Bus convert and away we go. The park rock formations are a striking red, sheer 130m cliffs make a canyon the tour follows. The canyon has a river during the wet season, which explains the luscious greenery in the canyon only. There are artistic carvings, apparently directions for early humans to use when moving flocks of llamas and other livestock to different grazing lands. Within the canyon the red rock cliffs have formed a ripple, like a curtain or drape, as water eroded channels and the wind rounded these into veritical waves. Could be used to create quite a good echo hehe

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    Similar to the rock ripples, the wind and water also created these "needle" formations. This formation is called the Gothic Cathedral...

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    I was also really impressed with the wildlife here. Never before have I seen so much and so many of the giant Condors - with a maximum wingspan of 3.3m these are one of the largest birds in the world. Some looked to be a mated couple (a not-so-fun but still interesting fact, when one of the mates passes away, the other will often fly to a great height and then intentionally plummet to the death...)

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    We also saw La Mara - a giant mouse that's endemic to Argentina

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    Lastly, the rock formation called "the monk" which my mates back home have re-named "the circumcised rock" ...:fpalm

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    #20
    powderzone and mrsdnf like this.