Any 73-75 TM125 Gurus here?

Discussion in '2 smokers' started by volkrt, Jul 31, 2013.

  1. volkrt

    volkrt Adventurer

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    Hello to all - I am in the process of restoring a 74 tm125 and was wondering if anyone on this board has one or has restored one...had some questions...nice board you all have here with some great stories and pictures!
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  2. volkrt

    volkrt Adventurer

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    grabs milk crate to sit on.....looks like it will be a while till one comes by :1drink
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  3. buls4evr

    buls4evr No Marks....

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    OK.... Some big paragraphs come to mind here but lets just speak to what you GENERALLY DO TO ALL OLD CROSSERS. Lets' just start by disassembling the whole thing like this.... You got a camera or smart phone? Take pictures of all the bikes details as they are. Now you can start any where you want to look, but I would suggest the engine first.
    The thing needs total cleaning before disassembly. The top end and side cases need to come off so you can see everything. So what wore out on 70s 125s? Everything.... Piston ,rings, rod bearings, crank bearings all need inspection and replacement to spec. The clutch took a real beating in these engines. How is the clutch basket and the plates and springs should be measured and/or replaced. Is the Trans C/S stable or does it have play? At this point you likely need parts so order them and do any machining work it needs. Experience tells me this part of the bike needs the most work.It also takes the longest to get fixed .
    Now get the frame bead blasted and check it for cracks. Cracks should be welded up. Especially look at the area just under and around the footpegs and just below the steering head. After you have done this you need to replace the crappy Suzuki swingarm bushings with some good metal aftermarket bushings. The whole frame should be thoroughly sanded, cleaned, primered, re-sanded, primered again and painted. Look at the swingarm and prepare in the same way.
    Wheels are next. Cracked rims? Broken spokes or hubs? They had light wheels. If you need spokes get the good Buchanan stuff. The rims were pretty good DID stuff. Check/replace /grease the wheel bearings. Paint hubs if you need to while the wheel is apart. Back wheel is the same except you want to start with fresh chains and sprockets on everything. Use the good stuff not junk. Modern chain not the OEM type.
    Now forks. If you can get new springs and revalve the damping rod. Any number of good shops do this. You will need new seat foam and a cover likely. Gas tanks, carbs need to be cleaned up and rust free. The gas caps were junk so hope that someone has made a replacement. Too long already....but this gets you started. Now you see why not a lot of friends are responding. A lot of work.........:deal
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  4. volkrt

    volkrt Adventurer

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    lol..thanks for your input but i was just hoping their might be someone on this board who has had some experience restoring this specific machine..I just had some questions....
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  5. joexr

    joexr Banned

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    Spit it out man.:ear
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  6. volkrt

    volkrt Adventurer

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    lol.... this rear sprocket hub setup the tm has...are the hubs usually a little loose becuase of the rubber fittings the sprocket hub fits in to? its a wierd setup..... also what weight fork oil are you running in your tm? and have you converted your tm to a premix only?
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  7. joexr

    joexr Banned

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    Don't have a Tm. You're talking about a cush-drive. You might try finding new rubber bushings. Don't convert to premix. The Suzuki's had an advanced injector system called CCI. Crankcase cylinder injection. It pumped the oil directly to the crank bearings and the back of the piston. I've never heard of an oil injector system failure.
    #7
  8. volkrt

    volkrt Adventurer

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    thanks for the reply.....rubber bushngs wont help this type of setup you would have to see it......the stock cci system is reliable but a pos ...most riders who owned tm's in that era converted it to premix...you have to split the cases but it can be done.....thanks for your input but maybe one day someone who owns a tm will stop by....have a good one
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  9. wfrpalm

    wfrpalm Been here awhile

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    Try suzukits.com., somebody there might be able to help you.
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  10. volkrt

    volkrt Adventurer

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    thanks for the reply...thats the first place I looked, and called.....the business was sold to the owner of ceet products and now they just sell some parts but dont have a lot of technical people there
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  11. joexr

    joexr Banned

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    You own a TM and don't know anything about it.:lol3
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  12. wfrpalm

    wfrpalm Been here awhile

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    No this one is a site for 1 banging, 2 stroke Suzuki owners.
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  13. FJ_Kevin

    FJ_Kevin Been here awhile

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    Here is my '74 TM125 racing Bridgehampton in 1976.

    [​IMG]

    I loved the bike and thought I was Rodger Decoster while riding it. It was rugged and I rode the wheels off it. To make it more competitive against newer bikes my dad laid down the shocks for more travel. There was an article in one of the magazines (dirt bike or popular cycling) that showed this modification. My dad did an improved version.

    The shocks were koni's internals with Poppy (?) finned aluminum bodies. Not gas charged but still very trick at the time.

    He also extended the fork dampers for more fork travel. He turned spindles on a lathe with threaded ends that screwed into the original damper rods. He also added valves in the fork caps for air adjustment. The rock guards on the fork sliders are Hot Wheels track :lol3. And you can see I am wearing the latest in riding gear.

    He got rid of the oil injection. From what I remember, he split the cases to modify a shim that had a rolled outer edge designed to retain the oil from the injection system around one of the main bearings. I believe he trimmed the rolled edge away on the lathe as otherwise lubrication would inadequate when using premix only.

    I loved the bike and was reluctant to switch after he had finished a hot rod yz for me part way through the year.

    But his YZ ( a highly modified '74 YZ125A, the silver one with alloy tank and tank straps) was a winner right from the start, blowing away the new '76 Elsinores and RM's (see 640 below)... so the TM was soon sold.

    [​IMG]

    My dad was a cool guy and very innovative.
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  14. volkrt

    volkrt Adventurer

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    your right my bad..I was thinking vintagesuzuki.com ..I have been to that site before but the tm section is a ghost town...but thanks for putting it out there
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  15. volkrt

    volkrt Adventurer

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    thats a great pic and thank you for sharing it with me....your dad sounds like one heck of a guy...much respect to him and you.... i'm debating on doing the premix mod on my restoration or to just go full blown down to the last bolt correct resto or make a period mx racer for the time..... thanks for the insight on the mod and everything else sir
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  16. Valleyrider

    Valleyrider I Survived The '60s

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    This was the proper way to go to pre-mix on the Suzukis.
    BUT.... You should also drill the cases, ala Yamaha, to provide adequate lubrication to the mains.
    #16
  17. volkrt

    volkrt Adventurer

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    would you happen to know where I should drill the case per chance?
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  18. Valleyrider

    Valleyrider I Survived The '60s

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    Well, I've searched and found a photo from my DT1 Build
    There is a lot to doing this the right way if you're planning on changing your Suzuki over. Not just drilling two holes....


    [​IMG]
    #18
  19. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    Very,very familiar.
    My dad kept my race bikes going also.
    I ran the Hot Wheels tracks on my 73 CR250 Elsinore for fork protection as well.
    Later I wrangled a deal with the Suzuki shop and traded in a GT80+ cash on a 76 RM125,1st year with 6 speed and laid down shocks.
    I raced Marysville MX with it and there would be 3 classes of 125's @ 36 riders each.

    Long,long day with lots of riders and motos. I figured out I could get a 4th and an 8th or 9th and get top 3 easy,consistency was the trick.

    Fun Times!
    #19
  20. volkrt

    volkrt Adventurer

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    appreciate you taking the time out of your day to find a pic....I have tried to ask on a tm board I found and even some local mechanics but your picture is the best I have seen to date.... I heard even one of the magazines in 1975 did an article on how to do it ..if I could ever find out which one id try and chase down the mag.....thanks for the help trying to find anyone online these days or even in person that knows how to correctly mod these bikes is very very rare..
    #20