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Any thoughts on killer bees and camping trip planning?

Discussion in 'Americas' started by basketcase, Sep 30, 2007.

  1. basketcase

    basketcase lifelong reject fixer Supporter

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    My wife says I'm genetically hardwired to spot trouble. We all know that the woman is always right -- whether she says anything or not, and the man is always wrong -- whether he says anything or not, but hey -- I have nonetheless avoided a lot of trouble by planning ahead!

    Has anyone had any experience with Afrikanized Honeybees, aka, "killer bees" while riding and/or camping?

    http://www.desertusa.com/mag98/sep/stories/kbees.html

    These critters are now well established in the southernmost part of the southwest, and are as far east along the US coast as New Orleans.

    I have really been looking forward to next summer (2008) to get a trip or two out west under my belt. This potential hazard adds a new dimension to disaster planning.

    If you have had experience with these bees, or have suggestions for what one might encounter in remote areas, I would appreciate reading them.

    Thanks,
    Rick
    #1
  2. acejones

    acejones Long timer

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    Enjoy the trip and don't worry about bees. Worry about more likely things, such as flats, chain problems, etc.
    #2
  3. ka5ysy

    ka5ysy Doug

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    +1 on enjoy the trip. As a long-time beekeeper I can give you some comfort in that the bees will generally leave you alone unless you stumble into a hive somewhere. Generally the wild bees like to go into anything that is available. You will notice honey bee hives because there are generally a few to many bees sitting on the entry of the hive .

    With any bee encounters, it is generally not a good idea to be wearing dark color clothing, which will incur an attack much quicker than light clothing. White is a great idea.

    The African bees will mass-attack if disturbed, and the best defense is to evacuate the area immediately.

    if you are stung, the honeybee will leave a small white stinger at the site of the sting. DO NOT PINCH IT TO REMOVE!

    There is a small poison sac waiting to be squeezed that you need to deal with as follows:

    If you have fingernails, using one good nail, scrape the stinger off and dispose of it. If you have no nails, use a pocket knife to scrape the stinger off the skin. This procedure avoids injecting the venom like a hypodermic.

    The scraping needs to be done in an expeditious manner, as the stinger mechanism is rocking two barbed stings that will walk the whole thing into the skin, all while injecting the venom.

    Should you, or anyone around that has been stung, experience a shortness of breath, rapid skin redness, or have a major skin color change around the site of the sting, GET MEDICAL ATTENTION IMMEDIATELY ! There might be an alergic reaction happening and this is a safety-of-life situation

    Ride safe !

    Doug
    #3
  4. Lone Rider

    Lone Rider Registered User

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  5. Burtonridr

    Burtonridr Wanderlost

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    Thats a great thing to remember :thumb
    [​IMG]
    I would worry more about something more likely such as an attack from a wild chettah
    [​IMG]
    , snapping turtle
    [​IMG]
    , or killer racoons
    [​IMG]
    :oscar jk
    #5
  6. McB

    McB Joe 40 ouncer

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    If you know you are allergic to bee stings, it's generally recommended to take along an epipen, which injects epinephrine, and can buy you time to get somewhere for treatment.
    #6
  7. Infracaninophile

    Infracaninophile Finding My Way..

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    Doug:

    Great info. Question: Do you know why bees are more likely to attack dark colored clothing more? Is it because they resemble animals?

    T.
    '';.
    #7
  8. FatChance

    FatChance Road Captain

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    No, Harley riders....







    :lol3









    :hide
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