Anyone Else Wondering About Hong Kong's Future?

Discussion in 'Asia' started by nicholastanguma, Mar 5, 2019.

  1. nicholastanguma

    nicholastanguma nicholastanguma

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    I am absolutely in love with Hong Kong. As a New Yorker I feel so at home when I'm there. But, surprising to absolutely no one, the ever-tightening governmental hands reaching out from Beijing seem in so many cases to hardly regard the "HK freedom until 2047" stipulation. What will HK be in ten years' time? Twenty? I'm genuinely annoyed that the Mainland is invading HK, although, again, I know this action is surprising to absolutely no one.
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  2. yokesman

    yokesman Long timer

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    they will be strangled long before then. watch china uncensored.
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  3. Farang Paul

    Farang Paul A Late Convert

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    Stop fretting, stop thinking like an American, embrace change, enjoy HK while you can - then move on. Everything in Asia changes at a faster rate than in the West; sometimes for the better, sometimes for worse. Mainland China owns HK, it is theirs to do with what they will. It has suited them in the past to leave HK and Macau as doorways to the Western world, doors that could always be shut if things got out of hand. Now that the mainland is in much closer contact with the West, directly through most of its major cities, the need to route everything through HK is no longer there, this makes HK less of a useful entrepot and less needful of special status. Move to Shanghai - much more fun!
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  4. nicholastanguma

    nicholastanguma nicholastanguma

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    What gives you this opinion? Especially seeing as how, at least as far as I understand it, China's major urban centers are outlawing motorcycles within city limits?
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  5. Farang Paul

    Farang Paul A Late Convert

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    "What gives you this opinion? Especially seeing as how, at least as far as I understand it, China's major urban centers are outlawing motorcycles within city limits?"
    You obviously have not tried to ride a motorbike in Hong Kong or Shanghai. In neither place would most people consider riding for enjoyment or bother owning a bike except to save money on transport (which most expatriates don't need to do). The OP was commenting on a quasi-political subject unrelated to bikes and I was answering him on the basis of having grown up in Asia and having lived in HK for many years both before and after the hand-over and then having lived in China for over 10 years since. If you know better, then I bow to your expertise.
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  6. nicholastanguma

    nicholastanguma nicholastanguma

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    I am the OP, and I wasn't being fractious--my queries were genuine. I'm genuinely interested in why you prefer Shanghai to Hong Kong. From what I've heard from expats in China (one in Shenzen the other in Huizhou) the major urban centers in China have made motorcycles illegal within city limits.

    Also, what about the riding opportunities in HK's New Territories? I've heard some HK expats say they are, in fact, fabulous, although riding within Kowloon or Central would clearly not be for recreation.
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  7. Farang Paul

    Farang Paul A Late Convert

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    I have lived in HK 3 times in the last 50 years. The last time (left in 2004) I didn't bother with a bike - why?
    Living in either Kowloon or HK side the bike was little used. Traffic, particularly the taxis, pay no regard to M/C's, there is nowhere designated to park bikes and the weather really is too wet or too humid to make driving in traffic any joy at all. Yes you could ride in the New Territories but speeding tickets (they know why you want to be there so there are cops and radar everywhere) plus the bind of getting there, reduced the fun and meant I didn't bother with one the last time I lived there.
    In China I lived in Panyu, Suzhou and Shanghai and owned a bike in each. Driving is piss-poor but at least they recognise bikes. With the growth of m/c manufacturing and the increasing number on the roads many cities now allow them (Shanghai used to and still does if you register for a Shanghai "A" plate)
    Quote: Feb 28, 2017 - In Shanghai, people riding scooters and mopeds without appropriate license plates could be fined up to ¥200 yuan if caught by traffic police. Applying for a plate is as simple as visiting a registration center with your identity card, a photocopy of your ID, and a certificate of quality for your scooter.
    Beyond the above, I feel HK is past its sell-by date and I personally found life in China much more fun and exciting with far more to do than Lan Kwai Fong and Wan Chai.
    Don't just listen to internet rumours, check it out. Both Beijing and Shanghai allow them and so does Tianjin, you just have to jump through a small hoop, that's all.
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  8. batoutoflahonda

    batoutoflahonda Long timer

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    I wouldn't worry about too much. I'm living in Zhoushan, and was in HK a few months ago. The immigration guy at the airport asked if I had flown in from China. I was like "uhhh, what?" Any way, the thing that appeals to westerners there is the English speakers, and it does have a hip San Francisco style vibe, but with friendlier people. I don't think any of that will change. As a tourist you're not going to be involved in government wonkiness, and from what I've seen, the cities and provinces pretty much manage themselves. This can be good and bad, as what is an enforced law in one area, isn't in another. So it gets confusing. The new scooter laws are good example. What is law in Beijing is interpreted/enforced differently here in Zhoushan, because they are the family car. If you haven't ventured out of HK, you really must. The people here are what makes this place truly great.
    #8