Aotearoa New Zealand on a WR250R

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by TuckerNZ, Nov 30, 2020.

  1. livingcolour

    livingcolour n00b

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    Hey @TuckerNZ, loving the ride report. Thanks for the great rundown and pix. Been fortunate to have ridden in NZ a few times and your posts are reminding me I need to get back there again.
    I've got a WR250R and was wondering how you rate the Kriega panniers? Are they easy to use, and to put on and off the bike? Worth the money?
    Thanks, and ride safe.
    #21
  2. TuckerNZ

    TuckerNZ Adventurer

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    Thanks mate - awesome and good choice of bike haha!

    The Kriega bags are extremely well built and a great piece of kit. However, if I was buying again, I wouldn’t get them for the WR (another bike, for sure). The frame is really thick - they are much better suited to a thinner dual sport type frame such as a KTM500 or even the CRF250L and KLX250 which isn’t as thick. I struggled to find good tie down points low on the frame and it’s not been ideal. In terms of on / off, it’s partly the way I’ve had to tie it down that it’s a pain - you can easily enough loosen the base and pull the whole thing off. The bags themselves are tough to get on and off the base when loaded. What you can do is remove the liners from the bag and take those with you, then reinsert. But if you’re loaded up that’s tough as well.

    You’ll also find if your stock toolkit is not installed the metal where that would normally sit will run hard on the base and needs some padding.

    I’d probably steer towards the Mosko Reckless or Giant Loop Coyote if I did it again.
    #22
  3. livingcolour

    livingcolour n00b

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    Cheers mate - great feedback, and thanks for taking time to provide it. Enjoy the rest of your trip.
    #23
  4. TuckerNZ

    TuckerNZ Adventurer

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    About time I revived this nearly dead thread.

    I'm not that great a documenter and had nearly given up on posting, but I'd like keep putting the memories down on the record.

    Since my last post in Taupo Bay where I chilled and surfed, I met an inmate (Mike) on here who had flicked me a PM and who was a Northland local.

    My meeting with Mike was brilliant. He is only what can be described as a true Kiwi legend - down to earth, genuine and more than willing to share his knowledge. He has been a guide in the area organising rides of all sorts and knew some pretty awesome tracks. I am thankful he chose to share those with me. Most I had a good crack at and Northland has been the real highlight of my trip so far. I also got a quick tiki tour around his farm which has fantastic views - and plenty of cups of tea and sandwiches. Mike has hosted well known ADVriders such as Lyndon Poskitt and Aaaon (Braaping Kiwi) - he is a volume of knowledge for the area. Thanks Mike, you're a legend.

    From Mikes farm, I ventured out to the Karikari peninsula, out to Maitai bay for lunch and then carried on up North towards the Cape, stopping to camp at the Rawara Campsite.

    - Photos from Karikari Peninsula. Beautiful - almost like being in the Pacific Islands! DSC05109.JPG

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    - Campsite at Rarawa Beach. Right next to the stream, beautiful spot. $15 a night. DSC05162.JPG

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    #24
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  5. TuckerNZ

    TuckerNZ Adventurer

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    On the way up to Rarawa, I took the beach up from Kaimaumau to Hauhora heads and headed inland nad up. From Rarawa, I continue up the the strip to the top of the North Island, a place called Cape Reinga. There is a lighthouse here and it is also where the two seas (the Tasman and the Pacific) meet. You can see the confluence out to see which generates decent swell.

    From here, I camped at Tapotupotu bay, and then the next night carried on over to Spirits Bay campground. This is a famous campground with a large rock on the hill where the Maori say the spirits of their ancestors used to come and leave the island. The beach here is spectacular, crystal clear water and nice and warm. I met a couple of lads here who I travelled with for a week or so. I stayed here 3 nights it was so nice. I swam at both spots. If you're in NZ, dont miss them. We spotted a large shark here and some massive stingrays just out in the surf.

    - Cape Maria van Diem

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    - Bike shot of the Cape

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    - Cape Reinga lighthouse. Top of NZ DSC05190.JPG
    - Sunset Tapotupotu beach
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    - Spirits Bay headland... well worth the hike. Stunning

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    - Walk out to Spirits Bay

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    - Sunset Spirits Bay

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    Attached Files:

    #25
  6. TuckerNZ

    TuckerNZ Adventurer

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    From the top of the North, it was time to head south. I headed out Te Paki stream, past the giant sand dunes that people rent sandboards and surf down. They're massive golden dunes, and look like heaps of fun. Given I was on my own, and couldnt be assed with the hike in my gear in the heat, I carried on down the stream out to the famous 90 mile beach.

    90 mile beach is NZ's longest beach, although actually only around 60 miles in length (not sure why its called 90 mile)? It's a rough, rugged coastline that you can ride the length of. I gassed it the whole way down the beach (skipping the state highway!) down to Ahipara, a lovely, rugged little surf town. I stayed here a few nights, met some awesome people and surfed the renowned Shipwreck bay when a storm from the south had been passing through. It's a great swell and has numerous breaks around the point you can hike to.

    90 mile beach is not one to pass up, the dunes are spectacular and you can't beat a bit of beach riding...! Bike was due a good wash after this one. I dont have many shots of it as I just gassed it - but video on the GoPro which is due for an edit later at some point!

    - Te Paki Giant Sand Dunes
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    - Shipwreck bay, horses just roam the beach. This one was trying to cool off!

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    From Ahipara I took the coast at low tide and came in near Herekino. A stunning ride, although the stormy weather made it tougher. I nearly got stuck on the rocks at one point, my back wheel got caught and the tide was coming in. I shat myself - I took two waves to the back wheel before I was able to jimmy it up and over the rock and carry on around the rocks back onto the sand. I got away lucky given I was by myself.

    I came across more horses - these ones wild I believe as they were just roaming the beach with no real farm in sight.

    - Wild? horses
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    - Herekino Harbour

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    From Herekino, I needed to clean the bike to get the salt off, and to stock up on groceries. I headed in to Kaikohe which was the closest big centre. The old man at the Bunnings warehouse let me use his garden hose to rinse off, what a legend! Otherwise there was nothing around, and I had taken on a heap of salt water getting around Ahipara. So thankful.

    With gas, groceries and a clean bike, I headed out down the West Coast. Through Opononi, through the Waipoua forest and down to Kai Iwi lakes to camp for a few days. Waipoua forest his home to Tane Mahuta, NZ's largest Kauri tree. It is an absolute monster of a tree and well worth a look, not to mention the beautiful forest drive through the Kauri on the way down.

    I arrived at Kai Iwi in the pissing rain, where I had to pitch my tent. I got it up quick but it was still wet inside. It was a cold night but the sun came out in the morning!

    - Opononi. The sand bar is extremely brutal you can see it in the top left of the second pic. DSC05385.JPG

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    #26
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  7. TuckerNZ

    TuckerNZ Adventurer

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    My time at Kai Iwi lakes was brilliant (although the campground was packed). The Kai Iwi lakes are 3, of which one has a campground at each end. The lakes are beautiful water, protected by the council. Due to the steep drop off in water level, two blue rings are created at the lake which gives it an amazing look. I swam, walked the lake loop track with a couple of lads and then stayed a night at the Trounson Kiwi Park.

    On route to the campground, I met another inmate at his lifestyle block for a couple of beers. Griz was a lovely guy, and we chatted bikes and all sorts while enjoying the beers. It turns out he is also a Kiwi guide for the area - which was handy given I was planning to try and spot some that evening at the Kauri park (they are nocturnal and come out at night, you need a red light not to scare them off). He also let me wash my bike off (thanks!) and then I was off. Hats off to another top Kiwi bloke - it's always nice to meet like minded people and have a yarn on the road (especially when traveling by yourself!).

    We stayed up til about 1am and then headed out to try to spot some Kiwi, but could only hear them. We did spot a large Kauri snail (sorry no pic!) but these are giants and quite rare to see so we were stoked with that.

    The walk itself in the Kauri park is beautiful - the area was logged but 400 hectares or so was saved and donated to the Government for enjoyment. The large Kauri are amazing and the forest is what NZ would have looked like before humans arrived.

    - Kai Iwi lakes lookout. This has to be one of my favourite places in NZ.
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    - Sunset Kai iwi

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    - Kai Iwi lakes loop track. 8km (2 hours).

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    - Trounson Kauri Park. (Unfortunately there is a fungus spreading in NZ killing these great trees - see example below). These Native trees are truly amazing. DSC05488.JPG DSC05500.JPG
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    #27
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  8. TuckerNZ

    TuckerNZ Adventurer

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    From Trounson, I spent a night at Pahi campground. This is a small little campground on the Kaipara harbour (largest inland harbour in the Southern Hemisphere). It was a cheap night on the route down through Auckland to the Coromandel. Well worth a stay if you want somewhere quiet, chill, cheap and tidy!

    As a detour, I took gravel roads down to Potou and went out and around the beach to the light house. This is one of the most rugged coastlines I had ever been on - it was windy as shit, wet, and cold. There are apparently 130 odd shipwrecks of the coast its that rough. I snapped a quick photo of the lighthouse, and kept pegging it back up the beach to escape the weather. A gnarly ride, I even binned it a couple of times in the sand.

    - Pahi

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    - Potou lighthouse
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    #28
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  9. TuckerNZ

    TuckerNZ Adventurer

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    From Pahi, it was a mish down to Coromandel. My next stop was Port Jackson, which is the very top of the Coromandel on the East Coast of NZ. The road ends and after a great 30km or so gravel road, you get to Port Jackson. The spot is remote and the beach is great, relaxed and warm. I camped here for 3 nights before heading down to Te Puru to meet a friend and hike the Pinnacles walk (a 6-8hr return walk, up the forest in the Coromandel Forest Park).

    - Port Jackson journey (cant beat this!!)

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    - Port Jackson. You can see the long island in the background. That is Great Barrier Island, off the coast of NZ (remote and mint surf spots too!)

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    - Hike the Muriwai Walk from PJ to the heads. Great views (2 hrs return)

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    - Camp at PJ. Beach straight ahead - $15 a night!! The family next door even gave me left over snapper (caught that day), pan fried and crumbed, with jam scones in the morning. How good are some Kiwis! I must have looked hungry? Haha.

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    - Sunsets at PJ

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    #29
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  10. TuckerNZ

    TuckerNZ Adventurer

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    Some pics from the Pinnacles hike. A decent sweaty slog up hill, not too bad coming back down. Great views and the weather held up for it, plus a beaut sunset (bit late) of Te Puru on the Coromandel coast.
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    Attached Files:

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  11. liv2day

    liv2day Life is about how you handle Plan B Supporter

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    Appreciate you keeping this going @TuckerNZ! And I'm not so sure about the comment on not being good at documenting the ride; the images and story you've crafted for your travels are fantastic.

    The places you've visited are seriously stunning; the diversity of topography is nothing like I've seen before. And it's really damn cool to have met up with some local riders/guides to spend time with.

    Have to ask, how tough is it to ride with all that stuff piled up on the back of the bike? Imagine it can't weigh a lot as that would really make it hard, be even the size of all that gear is something. That said, it's cool that you have hiking gear packed and have taken so many hikes during your travels. Be hard not to get off the bike and go enjoy those trails and that incredible scenery.

    Hope you keep the report going and continue to show us the amazing country you have.
    #31
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  12. TuckerNZ

    TuckerNZ Adventurer

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    Thanks mate, much appreciated. Glad you are enjoying following along!

    Yeah it probably looks like a bit on the back haha. You are right- Packing has been a real compromise - the gear itself isn’t very heavy. In the two dry bags is 2 drink bottles, small pot and then my sleeping bag, tent and sleeping mat. In the yellow dry duffel (35L) I’ve got my laptop, food, electronics and a few bits and bobs.

    I tried to pack reasonably light, but it does add up. I’ve got 15L of clothes, so not much in the end. The main thing is spare parts, some oil, and a fuel bottle for my stove (although I haven’t been using this, just using gas canisters). Weird how the space just disappears haha!

    You could definitely do it with less, but given I’ve been on the road over 5 weeks now, I didn’t want to have issues if I broke down in the middle of no where and wanted to be as self sufficient as possible.

    As far as handling, it’s way better without the duffels on the rear rack. The weight is so much closer and lower on the bike and I can ride it like a real dirt bike or drift the rear on gravel without issue. However, I have no trouble riding with it fully loaded and have taken it on some reasonably gnarly 4wd trails - you just can’t hammer it as the shock feels it, and it’s less forgiving in the corners.

    When I pass back through Wellington on the way home I’ll drop a few things. I’ve only found out what I use and don’t use once I started haha. It’s all good learning and I’d be much more refined if I did it again.
    #32
  13. TuckerNZ

    TuckerNZ Adventurer

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    Kia ora all

    Since my last post, I've made it back to my parents place in Wellington where I've been chilling a bit and fixing / working on the bike a bit before heading down to the South Island. Key things were replacing my worn chain slider (I'd patched it up twice with JB plastic weld), air filter, GPS mount charger (wasn't working), lubing my cables (clutch was stiff as shit) and checking and re-greasing my bearings. Thankfully my bearings were all good - including the linkage which take a beating. I also needed to replace my heat shield - it had burnt through and melted into one of my bags, and melted one of the straps clean off!

    However, to carry on in chronological order of my travels, my last post was the Pinnacles Hike in the Coromandel (North east of NZ). Following on from there, I took state highway 2 down to Katikati where my grandparents live - and caught up with them for a few days. Katikati is also pretty close to one of the bigger cities, Tauranga. By this point in the trip I had about 6500km on the speedo since leaving, and I was due for an oil change, new tyre and an air filter.

    Although I could have done it myself (and prefer to), I had no easy way of disposing used oil and a tyre from my grandparents - so went into one of the local moto stores. They were super busy but fit me in - had a fresh oil change, oil filter and new tyre on the following morning. Mum had posted me an air filter earlier which I also dropped in there. I was surprised how well the one I started the trip with had held up - the Yammie's airbox must be pretty tight, because only the lower portion was covered in dust, the rest of the filter was clean. Prevention is key - and I'm used to the routine of a new air filter every race from moto, so it felt good to get some maintenance done. In particular, my rear Dunlop D606 tyre was pretty well gone by this point. I opted for the Michelin Anakee Wild to replace it and I've been really impressed so far.

    From Katikati, I took the coast road along to Tirohanga beach. This shouldnt have been a big day, but it ended out being a tough one. I took a track called Pikowai Road on my GPS. What started off as a gravel forestry road soon turned into tight single track, which hadnt been used in sometime as trees, branches and all sorts were in the way. I buswacked my way a fair bit, until I got to a fallen tree. There was just enough space to zip around the outside, but the fall down the bank was pretty steep if it went bad. I lined it up and got through, carrying on, but the track just got worse. It had large stepdowns (half a metre plus) with large ruts that once you were in, you wouldnt get out of easily (even on an enduro bike). I though about turning around but I was too committed and wouldnt get back up the stepups loaded.

    My line choice was alright until I opted to take the rut rather than the upper ledge for one part - It was thin and I didnt want to slip a fair way into the rut so I just jumped in it. This was a mistake as further down the rut was halfblocked by logs and loose, damp wood. I tried to gas it over but the rear got stuck and pinned. I hopped off and tilted it sideways and tried again, but still stuck (the logs were digging into my swingarm and chain guide) I was in the wops, no one would ever come on the track for a rescue so I had to get myself out. I took my helmet and jacket off, and guessed the only way out was to dig. I got down and started ripping shit out from underneath the bike. About 10 mins later of digging and trying to get the rear up and over and I was free. I just hoped the rest of the track was passable, which it turned out to be but with plenty more dodgy, deep ruts. To be honest, I would have hesitated in parts taking an MX bike down some parts so I was pleased to get through with a heavier bike and luggage. I was dripping in sweat, but glad to see a gravel road when I got out of that bush...

    Unfortunately I was so in the zone I didnt end up taking any shots, including of the stuck bike! Live and learn though.

    By the time I got to camp, I was pretty exhausted but by laying my bike down the Barkbuster handguard had stuck against the throttle tube - so my throttle tube was now sticking and not springing back. I removed the guard, shaved the end of the throttle tube a bit and loosened off the guard. However, when I went to throw the spacers back in I dropped the spacer nut. The thing was no where to be seen - I spent over two hours searching to no avail, including an hour the next morning. From then on, I was one guard down and had to pack the bloody thing in my pannier. No idea where that nut went - absolute mystery but without it you cant thread the spacer into the handlebar.

    I also felt sick as shit after a chicken burger from the local joint so went to bed feeling like complete ass. It has to be one of the worst days of the trip - I didnt even make it to the beach at camp!

    Next days plan was to head out around the East Cape of NZ - a hefty 5+ hour drive, windy roads but with amazing views.
    #33
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  14. TuckerNZ

    TuckerNZ Adventurer

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    From Tirohanga beach, the East Cape drive was a beautiful days riding. I was glad at this point for some sealed riding - just chill out, enjoy the twisties and take in the scenery. Thankfully there was stuff all traffic and I had a pretty sweet run around the cape. I also decided to take the gravel road all the way out (one way) to the East Cape lighthouse. This is the most eastern point of NZ, and in fact the first place in the world where the sun rises. It was a good ride out, but windy as shit.

    The East Cape road is beautiful and windy. However, coming over the pass into the city of Gisborne the weather took a turn and started pissing rain. I pulled over and threw my rain gear and a jersey on, and carried on. By the time I got to Gizzy I was well cold and had to pitch up. It was so windy every time I tried to get the base of the tent down it was blowing away. I'd have to peg it down first. Thankfully there was a group of old ladies at the campground across the park. They must have been watching me as two came over smiling and said "old ladies to the rescue". They helped hold stuff down as I got it pitched.

    I hunkered down in the tent for a cold night in Gizzy.

    - Looking back towards Opotiki

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    - Beautiful clear shot of White Island (Whakaari). This is a volcanic island that used to be a big tourist destination, until December 2019 when it went off when people were on the Island. 22 people died.

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    - East Cape Lighthouse

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    - Shot of the road to the lighthouse
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    Attached Files:

    #34
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  15. TuckerNZ

    TuckerNZ Adventurer

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    After a couple of days chilling in Gizzy and checking the local beaches, I carried on heading south. There is a peninsula South of Gisborne called Mahia, which is a popular surfing and holiday destination for Gizzy and Napier locals. It also houses RocketLab - NZ's private rocket company. I wanted to check the surf out and also see what I could of RocketLab (which turns out not much!).

    To get to RocketLab, there is a long, windy gravel road through on of the farming stations. Unfortunately you get stopped a 1km or so before the launch base, but it was a good ride and to see where they launch from. They have launched 97 rockets into space so a pretty cool NZ tech business.

    - Rocket Lab launch site in the distance.

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    - Mahia beaches

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    From Mahia, I backtracked a wee bit to a place in the gorge called Morere. It's a tiny spot just off the highway and has natural hot springs and a campsite for $15. There was hardly anyone there. I took a well needed soak in the hot springs before pitching up next to the stream and chilling out for the evening.

    - Camp at Morere. How good.

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    #35
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  16. TuckerNZ

    TuckerNZ Adventurer

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    From Morere, I continued south to Wairoa to gas up before a long trek north back up to Opotiki along the Wairoa to Opotiki track - including the Motu Road. Unfortunately I didn't stop for many photos here as I was just in the zone but it was a long long day in the saddle - about 7-8 hrs or so of riding. By the time I the Motu I was about 5hrs in and just wanted to make it through to Opotiki.

    I stopped for lunch at the Rere falls - a mint spot for lunch and the sun was shining. Too good.

    The route took in a mixture of state highway (windy as, as it cuts through a gorge) and farm roads. The Motu Road itself is a 64km road, from Motu in the south to Opotiki in the North. It traverses over a big forest pass, and has narrower, winding gravel and dirt through the bush. It is popular with hunters and downhill mountain bikers. It's a really great road and I enjoyed riding it.

    From Opotiki, I carried on to Ohope Beach where I camped for the night - a beautiful spot and consistently rated among the best beaches in NZ. I had fish and chips by the beach and read a book.

    - Rere Falls

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    #36
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  17. TuckerNZ

    TuckerNZ Adventurer

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    The next day was really just a matter of getting from the East Coast to the West Coast, where I would then make my way south down the West Coast of NZ to Wellington (at the bottom of the North Island).

    Unfortunately it was pissing down. I got soaked all the way from Opotiki to Raglan (a small coastal town, with the best surf in NZ - long left hand point breaks). I arrived in the rain, managed to get a small break in the rain to pitch my tent and then just chilled out. I had pizza overlooking the ocean from deck at the campground and read a book waiting out the rain - or so I thought.

    The next day I woke up and it was still raining. I packed up everything - wet tent and all in the rain following a Yoga session (much needed but not something I've done much of) and headed south. I took the pass over the hill from Raglan to Kawhia (another small coastal town). The road was so wet and gravel hadn't been laid down in awhile as it was clay in places and slippery. I could also barely see through the rain and fog in my helmet. It was a slow day, with nothing but cloud as I traversed the back roads up and over the coast.

    From Kawhia, I headed south further to Awakino. Along the way, there were brilliant roads (gravel, but a white gravel that had heaps of grip - it was great) through various forests. Extremely narrow in places (I had to use my horn heaps around blind corners to ensure I didnt get hit). The forestry was brilliant native forest. I couldnt count the number of wild goats I came across. Always scattering in the roads and then disappearing on the hillsides beside as I came trucking along. I only got the one shot on the camera - given the rain, I was really not keen on stopping for ages.

    The rain was so persistent, that it had seeped through my rain jacket and pants. I only have summer gloves with me and my gloves were sodden. I am also riding in my MX boots (not waterproof) and the water seeped in and my socks and boots were drenched by the end of the day.

    Despite the weather, it was really one of the best rides - peaceful as, awesome scenery and there is something about just carrying on in the rain despite the wet. I would well recommend that track to anyone.

    I really needed to dry off - and try to dry some of my gear. I parked up at the Awakino Hotel (its called a hotel, but this is rural NZ and its not much more than backpacker in terms of what you get). I stuffed my boots with a couple of small towels and hung my stuff up in my room, before venturing out to the Hotel bar for a burger and a drink. It was damn good to sleep in a proper bed... and the chick at the hotel desk let my wheel my bike behind the gate at the back to keep it out of sight - thankful.

    - The road from Raglan to Awakino, somewhere near the Robert Houston Memorial.

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    #37
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  18. TuckerNZ

    TuckerNZ Adventurer

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    The next day the route was to head down towards the Taranaki region and then back up the Forgotten Highway to Tongariro National Park (Central Plateau of NZ).

    Yep - my gear was still wet. It would be a day of gearing up with wet gloves, wet boots and wet pants and jacket. Haha. Least I'd had a hot shower.

    I took the coast road down to Stratford, where I had a coffee and a pie to warm up before taking the Forgotten World Highway North.

    The Forgotten World Highway is actually a state highway, but it is primarily use by tourists or farmers. It is also the only state highway in NZ that contains unsealed road. 12km plus is unsealed gravel through the native forest. It was a brilliant ride, traversing over various passes, through a tunnel and along windy roads.

    I stopped off for a muffin and a cold drink at the Whangamomona Hotel, which is about 60km in. Whangamomona is a self-declared republic and issues its own passports. They also hold presidents day every year. It's a cool little town and popular with bikies.

    From there I carried on until the terminus at Taumaranui. I stopped in here at the local bike shop to see if I could pick up a spacer nut for my barkbuster - turns out barkbuster doesnt even sell them, only in packs which are $65. But the parts guy was helpful and the mechanics out back had one that would do the job. He gave it to me for free but I picked up some chain lube to make it worth his while. Legend.

    I carried on to National park where I pulled up at the Youth Hostel backpackers. A small Japanese girl was on duty and she was brilliant. While not much bigger than my bike, she was excited to see I was travelling that way and said I could park my bike in the garage. It was awesome - I pulled in, unloaded my gear and got some much needed washing done.

    The next day, I would plan to ride two of the local tracks - the 42 Traverse and Fishers (which are usually done by people on mountain bikes). She cracked up when she heard I'd be doing it on a motorcycle.

    I also thought I'd see if anyone else was in the area. On the Adventure Riding NZ facebook page at about 8.30pm I put up a message to let people know my intentions (dang late notice I know!). Turns out a fella from Palmsterton North (2.5 hours South) was keen - and said he would boost up in the morning to meet me and ride. How good!

    - Whangamomona (someone had to show the Harley riders how its done!) DSC05673.JPG


    DSC05674.JPG
    - Tunnel on the Forgotten World Highway (sorry about quality - snapped off the GoPro video)

    GH010340.jpg
    #38
    young1, Watercat, liv2day and 4 others like this.
  19. liv2day

    liv2day Life is about how you handle Plan B Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Oddometer:
    2,748
    Location:
    Sherwood, Oregon
    So glad to see you continuing this report @TuckerNZ! Damn man, sounds like you've gone through quite a bit since the last update - especially that slog through the rutted mess of a track. Good on you for pushing through, imagine it had to feel fantastic getting to the other side.

    Having ridden in completely wet gear for an entire ride, I know how crummy it is - makes me wish I had a portable boot dryer at a minimum...lol.

    The scenery shots you posted are fantastic - so much diversity and so many crazy sounding places (to this American). The independent republic that issues its own passports - brilliant.

    Completely off topic, but have wanted to relate a story of mine from a little over a year ago from an encounter I had with a Kiwi while out on a long weekend ride. Out for a few days with a friend on something called the Cascade Discovery Route (mountain route that runs along the Cascade range in Oregon). Passed a guy riding a mountain bike on the track we were on and didn't think much of it. Ended up getting a flat and had to make camp earlier than planned. Next morning rolls around and and the same mountain biker rides up to where we're camped. He's from somewhere in NZ and has been traveling/riding around the US for a while. We exchanged info and I told him to reach out if he needed anything as he had several more days on the track heading south before he'd get a ride back north. Here's a shot of the three of us from that morning.

    [​IMG]

    I get home from the ride and a day or two later I have a voicemail on my phone from this guy's Mom in NZ. No one has heard from him in days - his Mom was able to get my phone number as he had tried texting me several times and none of them went through. As you can imagine, this had her freaked out and I was thinking the same thing - something bad had happened on the trail and he was in trouble. Keeping this as short as possible, search and rescue got involved as did the Sheriff's office. All the while his poor Mom and Dad are 19 hours ahead of us in the time and don't know what the hell to do.

    It all ended well, turns out he had phone issues and ended up heading north into Washington in another area without service. 5 or 6 days later he's back in cel service and his phone goes nuts from all the texts and messages from his family. He ended up heading back down and stayed with me for a night before getting on a train and going to California for more mountain biking down there.

    Haven't kept in touch with him, but I should reach out and see how life is. I believe he and his Dad rode together - think he has a DR650.

    Anyway, nothing to do with anything about your RR, but thought I'd relate the story.

    I need to get down to your country and ride. Look forward to the next update!
    #39
  20. TuckerNZ

    TuckerNZ Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2019
    Oddometer:
    43
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Dang, thanks for sharing mate. Glad hes OK! Oregon looks like an awesome place to ride. He may want to invest in a garmin inreach or something after that experience for sure.

    I've finished my trip around the South Island. Planning on updating this shortly! Been a bit of a hiatus, haha.
    #40
    liv2day likes this.