Around the world on a Vespa

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by s_gogos, Mar 15, 2015.

  1. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    217
    Location:
    Greece
    PERU (PART01)

    Discovering Peru on a Vespa scooter!

    We left Bolivia with a slight pinch of sadness, but soon after we entered Peru, we were full of excitement again. As usual, we promised that we would return to Bolivia one day and that made us feel way better! We were going towards Puno, a town at the shore of lake Titicaca and throughout the whole trip up to there, we enjoyed the view to the lake. The landscape was very similar to that of a Greek island in the Aegean sea. The strong sunlight, the yellow ears of wheat and barley, the drywall constructions, everything reminded us something of a Greek summer. Only the woven, multicolored dresses of the women who were working in the corn fields brought us back to reality:

    [​IMG] We were in Peru!

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    Agricultural work in Urubamba Valley

    Puno is not far from the borders of Bolivia and what came to our attention was that Peruvians were not that different from Bolivians. Peoples and common cultures can not be divided by lines on maps and international treaties. The only thing that changed when we entered Peru, was that people we met on the road responded more vividly and happily to our greetings. We had heard a lot about this country: about its people, its culture, its famous cuisine, the Inca civilization, the present rates of criminality…Well, let’s see what we actually saw!

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    Main road in Puno

    The moment we arrived at Puno, we started thinking if we were going to visit the “floating islands” (Islas Flotantes). They are small islands in the lake Titicaca constructed by the Uros (the people who live on them). Their whole surface is made from a specific type of reeds and they are a tourist attraction. We had been reading different opinions on various sites on the internet. Some visitors felt like they were visiting a place totally sacrificed to tourism and some others described their visit as a unique experience.

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    Organized tours to the “Islas Flotantes” – floating islands of Lake Titicaca (Puno)

    We decided not to go, after having read that the islands where the people live their “real” lives are closed to tourists and that they have permission to visit certain islands on organized tours only. Puno was an interesting small city with its modern and its more traditional neighborhoods. We walked in the city center, went (and dined) at the local marketplace and got surprised by a sign we saw about a Philosophy School under the name “Plato”. In Peru, the ancient Greek culture is highly esteemed and many people we met told us so. I even remembered the Peruvian truck driver who gave me a ride, when I was hitchhiking in Argentina, and told me the same thing about Ancient Greece.

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    Pedestrian area in Puno with all kinds of commercial stores for everyone, tourists or not

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    “School of self-improvement – Demosthenes the Athenian – Oratory and Leadership”…not sure what is being taught here (Cusco)

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    Tourist restaurants in Puno

    Our next destination was Cusco, the capital of the Inca Empire! We left Puno early that morning but it was impossible to be in Cusco on the same day, so we left the main road just before sunset and went to the first village we saw. It was a really small village and judging by the reaction of its people, it was not a place that a tourist would choose to visit. However, we knew that in a small, humble place like Santa Rosa there is a high possibility of having the most unforgettable moments.

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    Talking and learning Quechua with the nicest family (Santa-Rosa)

    We rented a cheap but surprisingly nice room and we started walking on the main road of the village. Every single person who passed by warmly greeted us and we soon felt comfortable enough to take both our cameras and start shooting the everyday life of Santa Rosa. A woman around 45 years old was sitting on the side of the road with her teenage daughter and her two younger sons. When she saw us taking pictures of her sheep, she was really surprised. When I made a simple joke about the sheep being a photo-model, they all started laughing and the ice immediately broke! For the next 30 minutes we were talking about various things: they taught us some phrases in Quechua (the language of one of the ethnic groups of South America), we showed them where Greece is on the map and the teenage girl explained us how difficult the English language is to her. All 4 of them were really curious about us and we were curious about them.

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    Our model in the small village of Santa-Rosa

    Maybe more than half an hour later, we explained to the family that we hadn’t eaten anything the whole day and that we were waiting for the local restaurant to open so we could have diner. When they heard it, the mother seemed a bit worried and she told something to her sons in Quechua. They left running and after a while they returned carrying 3 oranges. They offered us the oranges so we could eat a snack while waiting for the restaurant to open.

    For once again, we saw that the real solidarity exists among people who have the less material things. We left the place carrying our oranges and thinking about all the things that made us leave the “civilized world” and we walked into the restaurant. The main course was a funny combination of rice, pasta and potatoes all boiled in meat broth, which gave them an interesting taste but not enough “moisture” to be easy to gulp! One tasty herbal infusion was included in the menu and off we went to have some rest and be ready to travel to Cusco the next morning.

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    On our way to Cusco (Urubamba Valley)

    On our way to Cusco we didn’t have any unexpected surprises. The only thing that worried us a little, were the Peruvian drivers who seemed even worse than the Bolivian ones, but our first thought was to give them some time to prove us wrong. We had read a lot about Cusco and we knew that it is a well known city where all the tourists gather to start their trip to Machu-Picchu. However, we were in some kind of denial and we were expecting to find a small picturesque village ready to be discovered by us!

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    “Plaza de Armas”, the main square at the historical center of Cusco

    The city was of course bigger than that (some 500,000 people live there) and to get from its entrance to the historical center, we had to go through a nightmare of chaotic traffic and out of control drivers. We soon realized that in Peru there are absolutely no rules for any type of vehicle and the next moment a bus came into our lane with no prior warning! We only needed one second to be sure that we were miraculously alive and Stergios immediately started kicking the bus being completely furious! “Let’s leave this f**king place!” was his suggestion but I insisted that he should keep driving (he had enough experience to survive roads like these) and get to the historical city center. We didn’t regret it! The historical center of Cusco was really beautiful. Of course, there were thousands of tourists walking in its streets, but it didn’t bother us at all.

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    Locals and visitors at the historical center of Cusco

    When we started looking for a hostel in Cusco, we found everything a bit overpriced but just before taking the final decision to find a place outside the city, we asked the price for a room at a small guesthouse which seemed very cozy. We were lucky! We found the price for a double room very reasonable and we decided to stay there for some days. It was an old building (18
    th century), constructed according to the traditional architecture of the region, with an internal patio. On the store, there were balconies and the whole construction was based on thick stonewalls and wood. Its owners were really hospitable and everyday, they were waiting us for a small chat.

    [​IMG] We loved Cusco!

    We found all those things we usually look for at a new place: colorful marketplaces, kind ladies who sell various products unknown to us, nice narrow streets to walk on…Of course, we accompanied our stay at Cusco with some interesting culinary discoveries! For Stergios, it was the discovery of the Chinese cuisine (there are plenty of Chinese restaurants in Peru) and for me, it was the unexpected pleasure of eating “mazamorra morada”, a south American desert – a “purple pudding” made of purple corn and fruits served in a bowl with some rice pudding, too. Divine!

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    Narrow streets in Cusco

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    At “Plaza de Armas”, the main square at the historical center of Cusco

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    Eating at San Blas market (Cusco)

    Peru is a well known tourist destination, so we were not surprised when we were meeting people from all around the world strolling in Cusco’s narrow streets. What we hadn’t imagined though, was that someone so far from Greece could recognize what the logo “SOS Halkidiki” on Stergios’ jacket means. Andrei, a young man from Romania approached and asked us if we were Greeks. He then explained us that he was aware of all the environmental and social issues at the Halkidiki region. The huge problems caused by massive mining exploitation and the corrupt politics behind all these. He had stand for “Roșia Montană” in Romania, when its people gave the same fights as the people of Halkidiki do now. It’s a small planet after all and we were happy to meet a person with whom we shared so many things in common.

    However, the most important meeting we had, proved to be that with Galia and Doron, the couple from Israel we had befriended some time ago. We had first met them in the North of Argentina some months ago and we had been in touch since then. When you are on the road, friendships can be way deeper and we were really lucky to be in the same place with our friends again. We spent a day together, we laughed, we shared our new experiences and late at night, we said goodbye and promised to meet again. However, life hides some nasty surprises…After some months, Galia unexpectedly died from heart attack and this left us shocked but determined: we wouldn’t let even one day pass without making the best out of our lives! This is Galia’s legacy…

    We spent some days of relaxation in Cusco and we were feeling ready to continue with the next part of our trip in Peru. We had decided to ignore Machu-Picchu and visit its undiscovered (at least, not that over-exploited) sibling: Choquequirao…

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    On our way to Choquequirao


    (to be continued…)

    Thanks for reading!


    Travel Safe,

    Stergios & Alexandra
  2. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Greece
    PERU (PART02)
    Discovering Peru on a Vespa scooter!

    [​IMG]


    We spent some days of relaxation in Cusco and we were feeling ready to continue with the next part of our trip in Peru. We had decided to ignore Machu-Picchu and visit its undiscovered (at least, not that over-exploited) sibling: Choquequirao. Choquequirao is another Inca city which is under archeological excavation and the last few years is getting more and more known to travelers. We had learned about it by a French couple of travelers who described the whole experience as unique.

    Another reason why Choquequirao is not that famous is because of the difficulty of access. We had our information on how to visit it and we decided to do the 4-day (at least) trekking towards it and back. Some visitors prefer to hire a guide and mules to carry their luggage but we couldn’t afford this kind of luxury. It would be the two of us on a 22km trail (and 22kms more to get back), starting from Cachora, a small village accessible by vehicles 3,000m of altitude, going down to 1,500m next to Apurimac river and then up again at 3,000m to reach the archeological site. We had our doubts about our physical condition but since we were not under time pressure, we had decided to take our time to do the trekking. We had read that there is water and food available at the small settlements / camps along the way, so we had no worries.

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    Quiet life and nice view in Cachora


    The next day, we arrived at Cachora. The village was built at a really beautiful place, in a narrow valley between mountains, almost hidden by trees and with small streams running among the slopes. When we got there, there was a “fiesta” – a fair, taking place at the main road of the village, with music, food and alcohol and some kind of bullfighting (without killing the bull). We rent a room at the first guesthouse we ran into and after a small chat with the owner, we went out to find a place to eat.

    The owner of the guesthouse had started telling us about a Greek woman staying permanently in Cachora, but since almost no one knew exactly were Greece is, we didn’t pay much attention to his words. Only after a second person told us the same story about the Greek woman who stays there, did we start wandering if it’s true. A client of the restaurant we were at, called her and imagine our surprise when I heard a voice talking to me in Greek and telling me that she is coming to the restaurant to meet us!

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    Dining at the most fancy restaurant (Cachora)

    We were so happy to meet her, not only because she was Greek (sometimes, this can mean nothing at all), but because she was such a sweet person with whom we had a lot in common and we shared stories from our lives in Greece that made us feel close to each other. That day, we also met another great woman, Yovana and her husband Jan who promised to host us in their hotel when we’d get back from the trekking. Yovana borrowed us trekking sticks (which proved to be invaluable) and gave us important information for the trail to Choquequirao.

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    The view from our hotel room, where Jan and Yovana hosted us when we got back from the hiking (Cachora)

    We got up early the next morning, put all the things we would need for the next few days in the mountains on the vespa and left. The sun was not up yet when we left and we felt the cool breeze on our way to the place where the trail stars. At the end of the dirt road, there was a small restaurant-shop-information office etc, from where we bought some supplies and made the arrangements (a small tip) so that we could leave the vespa there for the next few days. We were now seeing in front of us the first 50 meters of the trail and… no more lies, the descent was about to begin! The days that followed were an absolutely unforgettable experience that we had never imagined!

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    Looking down the trail to Choquequirao. Our first thoughts? “It’ll be tough!”

    Not long after the beginning of the descent to the river and while Stergios was carrying the big backpack with most of our supplies and I had the smaller one, carrying some water and clothes, it became clear that the next days wouldn’t be very easy. The trail started from an altitude of 3,000m, went down on a steep slope to its base (1,500m altitude) and up again on an equally steep rocky slope, until it reached its end (3,000m altitude). There lied the archeological site of Choquequirao. It didn’t take more than 4kms of trekking to feel my knees hurt a bit. I started worrying about if I would make it to the end and Stergios started worrying about if he could tolerate me whining about the various aching parts of my body. Among the nasty experiences that followed, the millions of vicious insects that stung and bit us, had a leading part and as always happens with insects, they preferred my blood…Ouch!

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    Our first steps on the trail to Choquequirao

    During the trekking, our pain faded every time we stopped for a while to look around us. The view was magnificent! The vegetation of the region was so dense and all the mountains and hills were covered by a green carpet. At the bottom of the gorge, we could see the Apurimac river and we could hear the noise of the water. We didn’t meet many people on the way to Choquequirao, only 2-3 groups of 6 persons maximum walking with their local guides and having their luggage on the mules. And, while all visitors seemed tired – even exhausted, the locals who were also going up or down the gorge, had no signs of tiredness. They were not athletes and some of them were old enough, but they had perfectly adjusted to the harsh environment and the difficult conditions. We spent the first night at the camp just before the bottom of the gorge and the plan was to make it to Choquequirao 2 days after that. The truth is that we did it, but with some amounts of tears, sweat and insect repellent.

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    Let’s stop for a moment and enjoy the view (trail to Choquequirao)

    While we were walking the last 4 kilometers of the trail to Choquequirao – having left most of our luggage at the last camp before the archeological site, it was like we had wings on our shoulders! We were so impatient! We wanted to see if it worth the 3-day trekking, the insect bites, the exhaustion and if the stories we had heard were true or exaggerated. The vegetation was even more dense, the forest had something of a tropical jungle with all the humidity and the plants with the huge leaves and for the first time after 3 days, we could spot some ruins hanging from the steep slopes!

    "The feeling we got when we finally reached the main archeological site is difficult to describe."

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    Breathtaking view! (Choquequirao)

    The “butterflies in the stomach” caused only by the magnificence of the construction and the amazing environment, was something I felt for the first time in my life. And…we were alone! We could stroll around the buildings, cross the gates and lie down on the thick green grass with no one around us. We were told that no more than 80 people visit Choquequirao per day, and this happens only during the high season. So, the answer to the question: “Is Choquequirao worth the pain?” for us is: “Undoubtedly yes!”.

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    Hundreds of bites from tiny, though lethal insects (Choquequirao)

    On our way back to the village Cachora, we didn’t have any more surprises. Our feet hurt, the insect bites were itchy as hell and we knew exactly what to expect for the remaining 22kms of trekking. We even knew the menu of the dinner at the camps where we spent the 3 nights we needed to get back – rice and eggs. For the last 3-4 kilometers before we reached the place where we had parked the vespa, we were walking like experienced hikers. If someone saw us at that moment, he would probably believe that the trekking to Choquequirao is a piece of cake. However, the truth behind our fast walking was that we were anxious to find the vespa and go back to Cachora to have some rest, as quickly as possible. We were exhausted! The plan was 100% successful and after a while, we were happily riding towards our friends and the hotel room that was waiting for us.

    We stayed in Cachora for 2 more days, hosted by Yovana and Jan at their beautiful hotel. We also spent time talking with our Greek friend and when the time arrived for us to continue, we felt like we were leaving some real friends behind us. It’s a pleasant surprise to realize that true friendships can be made in only some days. Well, the small wounds on our feet were healed, we had regained our energy and the insect bites were not that itchy anymore…It was time to go! We took the only way up from the valley to the main road and for once more, we promised ourselves to go back to Cachora some day. The plan now was to head southwest to the town of Nazca. From there, south, along the Pacific Ocean and our last destination in Peru would be Arequipa, the famous city in the southern mainland. Our decision not to go further to the north, towards Lima was taken due to the only deadline we faced during our journey: the expiration date of Stergios’ passport. We could choose to go to the Greek embassy in Lima, but if we waited there for the passport to come from Greece, the rain season would find us in the most inappropriate roads for the vespa. So, south to Chile!

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    This gentleman was hitchhiking but unfortunately, there was no more space on the vespa (Ocoña)

    The route to Nazca was very beautiful because most of the way we were traveling along the Apurimac river which made the scenery very interesting: green forests, small picturesque villages and friendly people. The landscape became drier and drier as we started going down from the mountains and it was the first time that we were about to reach sea level. From the northern part of Argentina, some months ago, when we started climbing the Andes until that day, we were at above 2,000m of altitude. The first thing we had to do was to replace the carburetor jet of the vespa with the normal one, we would also put the air filter back to its place and I wouldn’t have to worry anymore about pushing the vespa and walking on the mountains…

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    The environment seemed a bit hostile next to the Ocean (South Peru)

    We would soon see the Pacific Ocean for the first time! After an “obligatory” extended stay at a small village, due to a slight case of food poisoning, we were ready for the homestretch. From now on – with an exception for our visit to Arequipa, we would follow the “Panamerican Highway” all the way down, to Chile. We had been told that Arequipa worth the visit as it is a beautiful city and capital of the culinary culture of South Peru. From the day we saw the Pacific Ocean, until the moment we almost reached the outskirts of Santiago, we were accompanied by strong winds and sand.

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    Sand and tar (South Peru)

    We knew that we would soon be entering the huge region of Atacama Desert, but we hadn’t realized that it starts already from the southern part of Peru. We spent our first night next to the Ocean, at a fishing village called “Puerto Lomas”. It seemed like a tourist resort but we probably got there during the low season, so things were a bit…dead. No visitors, no open stores, nothing. The small wooden and colorful beach houses were closed and even the locals seemed well hidden. We only managed to meet a kind old lady who cooked us a delicious meal and treated us like if we were her children.

    The next morning, we left Puerto Lomas to go to the Peruvian mainland for one last time. Arequipa was at only 2,300m of Altitude and we were curious to see the “White city” – as it is called. The city is built in a plateau, among 3 volcanoes (the most famous is called “Misti”) and its older buildings are constructed from white volcano stone. The whole region around, is an earthquake zone and we realized it already from day one! While we were having a cup of coffee at a cafeteria on the central square of Arequipa, we suddenly felt the typical noisy shaking of an earthquake! We immediately thought of getting out of the place but we saw that no one moved. We got a bit puzzled by the non-reaction of the rest of the people and we asked the waitress about the earthquake. She explained us laughing, that this wasn’t an earthquake, but only a tremble! Well, probably, when the people of the region talk about earthquakes, they mean something that we in Greece, would call an “Armageddon”!

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    “Volcanic” view from our hostel (Arequipa)

    We spent about a week in Arequipa and it was the only place where a lady warned us about the muggers at the municipal marketplace. We preferred to listen to her advice and avoided going there with our cameras and handbags. It was the first time that we didn’t ignore this kind of advice, maybe because another man we met some days ago, warned us not to stay in that specific part of the city (where we stayed without the slightest problem!). In Arequipa, we didn’t do anything different from the other cities we stayed. Some hundreds of photos, some strolling on its streets and of course, some local cuisine testing! Apart from the various – unknown to Europeans – dishes we tasted, we felt obliged to try the famous “Ceviche” (raw fish with chili peppers and lime). We didn’t regret it. We also tried the “Rocoto Relleno” (stuffed hot pepper served with potatoes and béchamel sauce) and the “Causa de Pollo” (a pie made from mushed potatoes with chicken and mayonnaise) and many other dishes, but since we don’t have a food blog, I won’t refer to our culinary experiences with more detail than this!

    After a week in Arequipa, we couldn’t keep postponing our departure. It was time to leave. Our next destination would be Tacna, the last town on the south part of Peru, next to its border with Chile (Arica). We hadn’t read much about Tacna. The only information we had was not deeper than it sounded: Tacna is the last town of Peru before the border with Chile. We only stayed 3 days there, trying (and succeeding) to spend the few Peruvian money we had (it didn’t worth the pain to change such a small amount). Three peaceful days thinking about our time in Peru…From our first days in this beautiful country with the kind and smiling people to the last ones, we never came across with any of the criminals, muggers and other scums we had been warned about. Maybe this reality exists somewhere and bad things have happened, but we have not even one bad memory from our stay there. Bad things can happen everywhere, but good things also happen! We will always remember the silly faces of the llamas and the alpacas, the magnificent places we visited and the legacy of the Inca Empire. However, above all, we will remember the people we met: the family in the small village of Santa Rosa who gave us the oranges, Yovana and Jan and their great hospitality in Cachora, the beautiful eyes of our Greek friend and our last meeting with our dear Galia…How can we forget all these people who made our stay in Peru unique!

    Some last smiles and off we went towards Chile. The narrow land between the Andes and the Pacific Ocean was waiting for us. From its northern part, the Atacama Desert with its mines and its tiny purple flowers, to the capital – Santiago and from there, to the famous South…

    Thanks for reading,
    Stergios & Alexandra
  3. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    After 180,000 kilometres in Europe, Africa and America, we are now sure that there's no place on earth not worth seeing!
    This is how we spent 2.5 years around the world on a Vespa...


    OZKAT, vtwin, Edmond Dantès and 7 others like this.
  4. OP1CANOP

    OP1CANOP n00b

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    Hi there, I have really enjoyed reading your adventures, if only I had the time & money to do that...I can dream !! Can you please tell me, as I do remember you have already answered this question before, but I cannot find the answer now, but what cameras did you use ? as the images are fantastic, although I am sure it is the photographer and not so much the camera that has done the work.
    Respect !
    s_gogos likes this.
  5. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

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    Hi,
    The camera we used for the video was the Drift Ghost and the Drift Ghost S (there are 1-2 shots we used a friend's Gopro as well).
    As for the photos, some times we use the Drift, but mainly we use mirrorless cameras (a Samsung nx100 for Africa & a Sony a6000 for S.America)
    :beer
  6. barba

    barba Adventurer

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    WOOOOOOW!! really great pictures!!!!!!!!!!! and great ride!!
    s_gogos likes this.
  7. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

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    Thanks!! :beer
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  8. OP1CANOP

    OP1CANOP n00b

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    Hi there, As I have said before, great pictures ! Do you use all the functions of your camera in manual mode, ie changing the aperture and shutter speeds, or do you normally use automatic modes ? Also some of the pictures look like you have changed to black and white & added colours on certain things by using some photo shop editing. I am a complete novice with photography and would love to hear how you use your camera. Thanks for the great story. By the way I have only got up to your time in chile as yet...still loads to read !!
    s_gogos likes this.
  9. kahlgryndiger

    kahlgryndiger Been here awhile

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    Hey Stergios,
    your brilliant RR is one of the main reasons my girlfriend has bought an old Vespa PX 125 (177) ...
    Hope you can live with that :D One of our next travels will lead us to Albania again, she with her PX and I take the Enfield as usual.

    Thanks for sharing your adventure :thumbup
    s_gogos likes this.
  10. RedDogAlberta

    RedDogAlberta High Plains Drifter

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    Edmonton, Alberta
    Also motivated by the adventure and looking at a GTV 300 ie in the spring. It's time to get back out there myself. I owe this thread a great deal for that. Thanks.
    s_gogos likes this.
  11. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

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    Thanks for commenting OP1CANOP!

    I never use automatic mode (at least not the full automatic one). I normally take pictures in A mode (aperture priority) so that I can control the aperture. In some circumstances I use manual mode (for time-lapses, night skies etc) or S mode (to control the shutter speed). Most of the cameras nowadays let you keep only a certain color in their menu. You don't need photoshop for that. You need photoshop to keep a color (or many colors) only in a certain part of your photo. You can do that by selecting the area of the photo you want and then making it black & white (there are many free tutorials on youtube).

    I hope I got you covered. If not, feel free to answer anything you want!

    Happy reading,

    Stergios



    WOW, I'm so flattered, thanks!! Wishing you and your girlfriend all the best!!



    You just made my day, thanks!!
  12. kahlgryndiger

    kahlgryndiger Been here awhile

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    Well, we've been in Albania this year and we had a lot of fun.
    And you know what? We've met Juvena in Albania on her way from Singapore to Europe :D

    [​IMG]

    RR in german
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  13. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

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    OK. The world is so small!!
  14. RedDogAlberta

    RedDogAlberta High Plains Drifter

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    I actually did try for a GTV300 but the local Vespa dealer didn't return emails and wasn't around in the showroom. Local scooter club guys said it would be like that. So, I found a BMW C600 Sport demo with 1,350 km in their showroom. Photo is in the delivery area at the back of the dealer. It's a big pig that's too heavy but it flies on the highway and is very comfortable. I hope you're well.

    C600sport.JPG
    s_gogos likes this.
  15. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

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    Either on a Vespa or on a BMW, enjoy your rides!
  16. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

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    Oddometer:
    217
    Location:
    Greece
    WERE BACK ON THE ROAD!!!

    We made it at last and after a long break in Greece, we're now back in South America :D

    Our first video from the road is ready and it has everything: endless kilometers, extreme heat, litres of sweat, some wild animals (well, not the wildest ones), tropical vegetation and a breakdown!

    Oh, and it's in Brazil!



    *Don't forget to turn on the subtitles*

    Enjoy :beer
  17. johnnybgood8

    johnnybgood8 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2013
    Oddometer:
    317
    Im still here brah :) Nice to see you back!
    s_gogos likes this.
  18. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    217
    Location:
    Greece
    Awesome! It feels great that we're back :D
    johnnybgood8 likes this.
  19. Ladybug

    Ladybug Bug Sister Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2005
    Oddometer:
    15,437
    Location:
    Spokane Valley, WA (the dry side of the mountains)
    :lurk
    s_gogos likes this.
  20. chipguy1

    chipguy1 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2006
    Oddometer:
    16
    Location:
    Sudbury, Ontario
    Very entertaining video. I love your attitudes and humor. Thank you!
    Tom
    s_gogos likes this.