Around the world on a Vespa

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by s_gogos, Mar 15, 2015.

  1. roadcapDen

    roadcapDen Ass, Grass or Gas, no free rides.

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    "In 2020, may all the roads be open"

    Soonish?
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  2. ItsNotTooLate

    ItsNotTooLate Adventurer

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    I wish YouTube paid better so we could see more of this guys videos. Yeah, I know he takes donations, did that already, but still.
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  3. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

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    I hope you liked it! I know it's all Greek to you :lol3 Alexandra is doing her best with the subtitling so can understand as much as possible!
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  4. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

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    :rofl
    We didn't know anything, I swear!
  5. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the help!
    We' re doing our best to share content more often but as we prefer to do some editing first, it takes a lot of time and effort, especially while on the road.
    The quarantine is a very good opportunity though!
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  6. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

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    Peeps our new video from Argentina is now online and available for you to watch :clap
    In this episode we are riding through smoke, I'm peeling eggs and Alexandra is running after crocodiles...
    Watch it here ↓ and don't forget to turn on the subtitles.
    Enjoy!
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  7. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

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    We had this idea the other day:
    the last 5 live-streams we did with our Greek friends
    on YouTube were very successful
    and most importantly WE enjoyed the whole process A LOT.
    We still have plenty of free time,
    we still have unlimited access to decent WiFi
    and we're still thirsty for some socialization.
    So why not do a Q&A with Alexandra this time,
    in English this time
    , answering the questions
    you may have regarding our trip, our way of living,
    our Vespa, the people we meet along the way,
    the different foods, weird animals, weird stuff
    or just anything else you might have in mind!
    Actually, I'm wondering why we haven't done this already.
    Anyway, if you feel you'd like to know something more about us,
    if you'd like to be part of our Q&A,
    please fire your questions down below

    and see you soon!

  8. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

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    Also now that I finally have the time I always wanted (the quarantine continues here in Argentina) it's maybe the time to put this thread in order!
    To share the stories I didn't and maybe add an index in the begging so that you can read it easier :smile6
    I'll start ASAP!
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  9. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

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    - New Q&A video -
    In this special episode, Alexandra and I answer 66 travel related questions.

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  10. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

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    I might have said I'll put the thread in order, but I haven't managed to find some free time to add new stories yet [​IMG]
    Anyway, I'll start in reverse and hopefully I'll reach the beginning [​IMG]

    Here's our latest ride report from Uruguay:

    A ride around Uruguay

    When we did our research about Uruguay, among the information on the interesting places, the endless beaches and the colorful towns, there was another kind of information, that worried us a bit: the high cost of living. We try to keep our daily budget low, which means that we don’t want to spend more than 20€ (that includes the costs for both of us and for Kitsos) so, we had to plan everything very carefully. Traveling in a country that seems more expensive than our home country, Greece, could easily drain our wallets.

    The procedure at the border wasn’t difficult at all, but due to a mistake the person in charge at the customs office made in Kitsos’ TIP (temporary import permit), we spent more time there than we had estimated. So, when we finally left the building it was already late and the sun would be soon setting. Just before it got dark, we made it to a gas station and asked permission to camp at their backyard for the night, as we used to do in other countries of South America. But to our surprise, the answer was “no”. We respected the new reality and headed towards the nearest town. When we asked the price for a night at the campsite, we almost cried with despair. We hadn’t paid that much in months – actually it was in Brazil, some time ago. So, we chose to continue on the NR3 going south. To where? No idea! The drivers in Uruguay were fast and they had their own “close shave” style in overtaking, so we had to find a place to stop soon.

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    It was almost 22:00 when we arrived at the “Termas de Guaviyú”, a municipal spa complex with campsite and rooms, next to some hot springs. It was our only option but luckily, the price was very reasonable AND it included unlimited access to the pools! Two days later, fresh and rejuvenated we left the Termas and continued south. The cold was almost unbearable and despite we had put on all our clothes, we kept on freezing. Our initial plan was to go towards the ocean, but according to the weather forecast, the next ten days or so would be the coldest of the year. And not only this, but the fuel, groceries and accommodation costs were higher than we expected.

    After one more night of wild camping at a random riverbank and many kilometers among endless “tidy” pastures and cultivated land – result of the industrialized stock-farming and agriculture, we were somehow tired. Maybe it wasn’t the ideal time of the year to visit Uruguay, so it didn’t take long before we made up our minds: we’d ride directly to Montevideo, spend some days there and then ride back to Argentina.

    Montevideo was an unexpectedly pleasant surprise! Uruguay’s capital had a certain je ne sais quoi that immediately caught our attention. Since the prices for accommodation were beyond our budget and we are not fans of 16-bed hostel dormitories, we tried our luck and rented an Airbnb room in a local’s apartment. And that’s how we ended up with the best memories from Uruguay! (well, from Montevideo in particular). Our host Sandino and his lovely family, welcomed us as if we were old friends. They introduced us to the unique cultural life of the city, we had interesting conversations about the history of Montevideo, about Uruguay and Greece; we laughed and shared some drinks and Sandino’s delicious pizza.

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    The week we spent in Uruguay’s capital was full of endless walks around the city center and the bohemian neighborhoods. We strolled along the Rambla (the esplanade), we took pictures of every corner of the casco antiguo (the oldest part of the city) and we spent hours wandering around at the famous street market “Tristán Narvaja” contemplating the old books, searching for used clothes, looking at the various artifacts and the thousands of antiques. One of the top moments of our stay in Montevideo was the luck we had to attend one of the famous llamadas (dance parade) taking place in front of Sandino’s apartment. The uplifting rhythm of the candombe and the whole dance performance is one of the most prominent parts of the Afro-Uruguayan heritage, and it’s difficult to describe the contagious, euphoric feeling spreading from the participants to the audience, making it part of the whole thing!

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    The time to leave Montevideo came and our next destination was the famous Colonia del Sacramento, the old town with the colorful historic quarter, which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. When we arrived at the town, we realized that the historic quarter was indeed a very beautiful place, but in our eyes it was too touristic. So, we just rode around its narrow streets for a while and off we went towards the border (Fray Bentos). We spent one last night in our tent, next to a small village on the shore of River Plate, looking at the lights of Buenos Aires in the distance. The next day we would be in Argentina again.

    To be continued…

    PS Here's the video I made for Uruguay (It might be all Greek to you [​IMG] but fortunately there are english subtitles available. Don't forget to turn them on!) Hope you like it [​IMG]

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  11. SteverinoB

    SteverinoB EstebanarinoB

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    Most excellent video ... Thankyou
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  12. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

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    Thank you!
    :beer
  13. franken

    franken Been here awhile

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    near Munich, Germany
    fantastic tour, fantastic pics.
    Thank you for sharing
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  14. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the comment :-)
  15. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

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    (though I created a new topic, I thought it was a good idea to share it here too, so that those who are following this thread won't miss it)

    This is how much it cost us to travel around South America for 1024 days


    Are you wondering how much it’s going to cost you to travel around South America with your own vehicle?
    Here’s what we paid…


    As we've told many times in the past, our lifestyle is not a luxury but a choice. Of course, some preparation is needed – if you want – and some money too – at least in the beginning – but there's no need to be a millionaire or a pensioner(!) in order to ride your scooter around the world.

    The most important part is to make the decision. Then, it's good to have the will to continue and not give up at the first hardship – and when I talk about hardship, I mean hard hardship...such as eating rice and legumes for days in order to keep the budget low. Oh, and you'll be pleased to know that if there's two of you in the equation, not only will you be able to share the unique experience of the trip, but also the expenses!

    After 1024 days of everyday, meticulous record keeping, we patiently gathered all our expenses and made some very detailed charts and pies. You'll see information about the scooter's fuel consumption as well as its 2T-oil consumption and the costs (psychological ones, too) we paid at various technicians. You'll find out how many kilometers we rode on paved and on dirt roads, how many nights we spent wild camping, couchsurfing etc. You'll also see how much we spent on tolls, insurances, food, medicines... Everything!

    I hope you'll find this post interesting and useful. And most importantly, I hope that it will give you one good motive to make the decision yourselves and take the first step towards a simple and beautiful life on the road. Or at least, to take the leap and set off on a big ride around the world.

    If reading is not your thing, you can watch the video I made just for you:


    Days on the road¹: 1024

    Days spent at one place (not riding): 821 (80.2%)
    Days on the road (riding): 203 (19.8%)

    Countries visited: 7 (Argentina, Uruguay, Brazil, Paraguay, Bolivia, Peru, Chile)

    Number of days in each country

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    Argentina: 528 (51.6%)
    Paraguay: 210 (20.5%)
    Chile: 102 (10%)
    Bolivia: 72 (7%)
    Brazil: 54 (5.3%)
    Peru: 41 (4%)
    Uruguay: 13 (1.3%)
    Airports / Airplanes: 4 (0.4%)

    Total distance traveled² : 45,099 km (28,023 mi)
    2,600 km (5.8%) on friends' cars or taxis (1,615 mi)
    390 km (0.9%) on friends' motorcycles (242 mi)
    42,109 km (93.4%) on the Vespa (26,165 mi), from which:
    37,871 km (89.9%) on paved roads (23,531 mi)
    4,238 km (10.1%) on dirt roads (2,633 mi)

    Average distance per day: 41 km (25.4 mi)
    Average distance per day counting only the days we were actually traveling: 207 km (128.6 mi)
    Average fuel consumption: 4,9 l/100km (48 mpg)
    Petrol: 2,059 litres (543.9 gal)
    2T Oil: 43 litres (11.3 gal)

    Type of accommodation

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    Apartments, hostels, hotels etc: 688 nights (67.2%)
    Campsites: 133 nights (13%)
    Wild camping: 100 nights (9.8%)
    Staying at friends' houses: 83 nights (8.1%)
    Couchsurfing: 16 nights (1.6%)
    Airplanes: 4 nights (0.4%)

    Average accommodation cost 2.94€ ($3.46) per person per night
    Average campsite cost: 3.65€ ($4.30) per person per night
    Average hostel/hotel/apartment cost: 3.60€ ($4.24) per person per night

    The total of our expenses per category per person

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    Accommodation: 3,005.50€ ($3,546) (30.8%)
    Supermarket³ : 2,510.10€ ($2,961) (25.8%)
    Eat out (street food, restaurants etc)⁴ : 1,362.50€ ($1,607) (14%)
    Maintenance, spare parts etc⁵ : 1,154.25€ ($1,362) (11.9%)
    Petrol: 763.35€ ($900) (7.8%)
    Tolls, insurances, paperwork etc⁶ : 242.75€ ($286) (2.5%)
    Sightseeing & transportation⁷ : 227.25€ ($268) (2.3%)
    Misc⁸ : 121.75€ ($143) (1.3%)
    Meds & doctors: 98.25€ ($115) (1%)
    2T Oil: 96.75€ ($114) (1%)
    Internet / Telephony⁹ : 91.25€ ($107) (0.9%)
    Clothing¹º : 69.25€ ($81) (0.7%)

    Daily expenses per country per person

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    Uruguay: 17.12€ ($20.20)
    Chile: 14.59€ ($17.21)
    Brazil: 14.45€ ($17.05)
    Peru: 9.85€ ($11.62)
    Argentina: 8.57€ ($10.11)
    Bolivia: 8.45€ ($9.97)
    Paraguay: 7.29€ ($8.60)

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    Expenses per country per person
    Argentina: 4,525€ ($5,339)
    Paraguay: 1,530€ ($1,805)
    Chile: 1,488.5€ ($1,756)
    Brazil: 780.5€ ($920)
    Bolivia: 608.5€ ($718)
    Peru: 403.9€ ($476)
    Uruguay: 222.5€ ($262)

    Grand total¹¹

    So, the total amount after 1024 days on the roads of South America (from which the 180 “trapped” in Argentina under the covid-19 lockdown) is 9,742.9€ ($11,496) per person or 9.51€ ($11.22) per person per day or 19,485.9€ ($22,993) for the two of us or 19€ ($22) for the two of us per day! Not that much, huh? Keep in mind that these numbers are based on our needs and habits. The text you just read is not a guide and its purpose is not to teach or give any advice – but now you know how little money it can cost. Maybe it gives you the “push” you need to start preparing your own trip and stop using the “but I'm not as rich as they are” excuse!


    Notes

    ¹ This is the sum of our travels in South America from January 2015 to August 2020.

    ² Airplanes not included :p

    ³ “Supermarket” category includes everything we buy from supermarkets, convenience stores, grocery stores etc. Food in general, that we don't intent to consume right away. If for example we stop by at a supermarket and share a sandwich, this cost will fall into the “Eat out” category.

    ⁴ “Eat out” category includes the money we spend in street food, restaurants, food in general that we consume but not prepare ourselves.

    ⁵ “Maintenance, spare parts etc” category includes the money we spend for maintaining our Vespa scooter in good shape.

    ⁶ “Tolls, insurances, paperwork etc” category includes the money we spend in toll roads, insurance for our vehicle, plus any costs related to bureaucratic procedures, like extending our visas or our Vespa's TIP or our own passports. In this category we've even included 351.1€ for the obligatory insurance and the road / registration taxes in order to have a Greek license plate.

    ⁷ “Sightseeing & transportation” category includes the money we spend on visiting national parks, museums etc. as well as on excursions, taxis, buses and all kinds of transportation without our Vespa.

    ⁸ “Misc” category includes the money we spend on anything that doesn't fall into any of the other categories. Few examples: haircuts, parking lots, gifts etc.

    ⁹ “Internet / Telephony” category includes the money we spend on buying local SIM cards and credit. The total amount in this category is relatively high, because we had to upload huge videos and many photos on our social media and keep our blog updated. Under “normal” internet use, we don't think we'd need more than ¼ of what we've spent.

    ¹º “Clothing” category includes the money we spend for buying or repairing clothes.

    ¹¹ The grand total differs from the total of the “Cost per country per person” because here we've included 351.1€ for the obligatory insurance and the road / registration taxes we pay in Greece in order to have our Greek license plate. The grand total doesn't include the Vespa's shipping costs from Africa to South America, our airplane tickets, nor any costs related to our blog (maintaining our website, buying hard drives, cameras, laptops etc).
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  16. roadcapDen

    roadcapDen Ass, Grass or Gas, no free rides.

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    Thanks, I wouldn't have thought there would be that much difference in $ between Paraguay and Uruguay!?

    I used to have a '60's VBB 150, clutch and gears on the left side handle bars took some getting used to.
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  17. s_gogos

    s_gogos Been here awhile

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    There is a difference in many things but remember that we didn't do a comparison between the countries we visited, meaning that we didn't spend our money in the exact same things.
    For example in Paraguay we stayed almost exclusively in small hotels/motels rooms (they were extremely cheap), whereas in Uruguay we could only afford staying at campsites or renting a small AirBnb room inside one's apartment (it was the cheapest choice we had).

    The left side handle bar and the gear system in general needs some time to get used to it for sure :lol3
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