Arts and Crafts for old guys; boat build

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by blues, Feb 18, 2019.

  1. blues

    blues Long timer

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    Time to build a boat, I must be right out of my mind but hey.

    Been retired 3 years and suddenly felt the need. After lots of discussion with a buddy decided to give it a go.
    Me, on and around the water for most of my life, generalist engineer, with a bit of wood working, buddy Stu, perfectionist, machinist, expert at digging out the obscure, and knows everyone.


    The boat. A lap strake, planing day sailor. I took an adventure sailing course last summer and the bug bit hard. A lot like adventure riding except to be a member of the ‘club’ you need to build your own. Lots and lots of work but mostly fun and interesting. And some really interesting characters. That and you can justify buying lots of tools. And beer.

    So ride along for the good, the bad, and the ugly. Will attempt to post pics as we go.

    upload_2019-2-18_16-56-24.jpeg

    The calm before the storm.
    #1
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  2. blues

    blues Long timer

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    Apparently they do plane, time will tell. Light boat, lots of sail.
    #2
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  3. thumpism

    thumpism Between bikes

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    You're doing this in the basement, right? That's the only way to build a boat.
    #3
  4. 9mm

    9mm Been here awhile

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    Make sure you build the boat slightly larger than you exit door. Got to keep those traditions alive.
    #4
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  5. toolfooldan

    toolfooldan Need a witty/profound phrase to put here...

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    Make sure you build a place to stow those bongos on the boat. When there's no wind for the sails you'll then have something to do.

    I'm a hobbiest woodworker and I've always wanted to build a small boat or canoe, even though I know zip about boating. I'll be following your progress.
    #5
  6. Solaros1

    Solaros1 Long timer

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    One very important tip for boat building - Pointy End Toward Door.

    A good friend of mine has built three boats in his basement a little 16' rowboat, a 17' Coquina sailboat and a 23 foot boat with a small forward cabin and a two cylinder diesel powerplant.
    When it came time for us to extract boat #3 from his basement I observed that it would have been a lot easier to get it on a trailer if the stern wasn't pointed toward the french doors that opened out toward his patio.

    As it was we had to remove the door and casing, replace the header and enlarge the opening in the brick wall by three inches and the boat barely cleared.
    I asked him why he hadn't thought this through a little better and his reply was "I built the other two boats that way".

    The other two boats could be carried up the sidewalk to his front yard - we had to get creative with the big boat.
    It involved taking down the fence into his neighbors back yard, disassembling a major part of the trailer, two winches and a Land Rover Defender to drag the whole thing down a steep wooded hill in his neighbors back yard.

    IMG_3312.JPG IMG_3314.JPG IMG_3309.JPG IMG_3308.JPG
    #6
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  7. Solaros1

    Solaros1 Long timer

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    Getting it out of the basement was only part of the adventure - that was day one. Day two involved more insanity.

    IMG_3323.JPG IMG_0008.JPG IMG_0013.JPG IMG_0025.JPG
    #7
  8. UtahGuido

    UtahGuido Long timer Supporter

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    You’ve also got to have a “moaning chair” in the shop - a comfy chair you can retire to when things go horribly wrong, or in which to have a nice cup of tea when things go really well.
    #8
  9. neppi

    neppi Been here awhile

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    My grandfather used to build boats in his living room. They were sized so that he could fit them out the window in the end. But just. Grandma told him in some point that its either the boats or her. He had to ponder about it for a while, but he chose well. The downside of it was that there were no new boats coming out of that window anymore...

    Another Finn, Pertti Duncker, just decided to build himself a steel boat and then ended up spending six years sailing it all over the world, for instance being the first Finn to sail to Antarctica and stuff...
    #9
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  10. scootac

    scootac Just a Traveler

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    Any picture of what it SHOULD look like when done?
    Good luck!!!
    #10
  11. blues

    blues Long timer

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    upload_2019-2-19_12-18-28.jpeg

    Moaning chair ready to go. Right now I’m contemplating the piece on the band saw which arcs about 80 degrees, tapers from 2 inches at one end to 6 at the other, with both sides beveled the whole way.
    #11
  12. blues

    blues Long timer

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    The plan is to do most of the woodworking in my basement cause that’s where the wood working equipment is and I have ( had) lots of room. We’re going to build the strong back and plank it in my buddy’s heated garage. Then we’ll flip it over onto a trailer and fit it out in my garage.

    upload_2019-2-19_12-38-25.jpeg

    Here I am clamping epoxied planks together after carefully alignment. This morning I found that any imperfections in the clamping surface will emboss themselves into the epoxy. I spent some effort accordingly so we’ll see how this one looks tomorrow.
    #12
  13. blues

    blues Long timer

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    Video of the boat in action.

    #13
  14. UtahGuido

    UtahGuido Long timer Supporter

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    Well you know you're going to make screw-ups, and leave evidence of it behind, and only you are going to really notice them. But you will. The boat will be fine (as long as they aren't too egregious).

    You'd enjoy this place if you haven't been. It's the Viking Museum in Roskilde Denmark where they craft viking ships by hand using the old methods & tools.

    [​IMG]

    They even forge the rivets onsite.

    [​IMG]
    #14
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  15. MrBob

    MrBob Rabbitbrush Ranger Supporter

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    Will your boat be stitch and glue or plank on frame?
    #15
  16. blues

    blues Long timer

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    It’s lapstrake made from a special, $$, plywood, held together with epoxy. You bevel each plank to provide appropriate 3/4” bonding surface between planks. Epoxy is really slippery stuff so the trick is to get it positioned exactly where it needs to go and clamp it down. A composite nailer really helps here.
    #16
  17. Grreatdog

    Grreatdog Long timer Supporter

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    It is good fun starting with plans, teaching yourself to read them, lofting the hull the way it used to be done and building a boat. Life and epoxy allergy developing got in the way of completely finishing it. But I will get back to it in the near future.

    I never actually planned to build a boat. I just wanted to teach myself to read old plans relative to lofting a hull. But, once I got that far, putting a marine plywood skin on it was easy enough. I decided not use okuume since it will be hard used if I ever finish it.

    So, I have a boat that just needs final bottom fiberglass and paint.

    Have fun, it's a trip building from plans rather than a kit..............

    sunbeam001.jpg

    sunbeam003.jpg

    DSCF0002-1.jpg
    #17
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  18. ArcticaMT6

    ArcticaMT6 Been here awhile

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    Sprinkle a tiny bit of sand on the epoxy in the joint before clamping. Will prevent it from slipping as you tighten the clamps.

    This is a fantastic channel to watch videos from about the building process.

    https://www.youtube.com/user/TipsfromaShipWright

    I'm a Naval Architect, so a boat is on my way too long list of things to build. I figure it's only proper. The boats I work on are quite a bit larger and rustier, though.

    For anyone else here, the boat in question is a Gannet designed by Ian Oughtred. http://www.oughtredboats.com/

    The one I've had my eye on the past few years has been the Phoenix III by Ross Lillistone.

    https://www.duckworks.com/product-p/ross-phoenix3-id.htm
    #18
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  19. Roam

    Roam If you want to

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    Where did you take the adventure sailing course and what did it entail?

    Good luck with the build. It'll likely be a horrible yet somehow addicting experience.
    #19
  20. emerson.biguns

    emerson.biguns All idiot, no savant

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    +1

    :ear
    #20