Ask your WELDING questions here.

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by KTM640Dakar, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    Maybe you could make a piece from steel and weld it to the little tab, then add another screw or two. But I think a good welder could weld that up just fine. Had an old Sportster that blew the trans thru the bottom of the case. I made a replacement piece and had an old friend with a welding shop graft it in. It was no problem for those guys.
  2. mnmlst

    mnmlst mnmlst

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    I’d be wondering if you could grind the case flat, make a nice stack of pieces from steel to match the ‘eyebrow’ shaped stop piece, couple countersunk screws through the stack into the case...
    2old2Bbold likes this.
  3. DirtMerchant

    DirtMerchant Long timer

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    I don't think anything screwed in will take the impact of the kickstart returning back into it. This is what my tab looked like...
    IMG_9831.JPG
  4. mnmlst

    mnmlst mnmlst

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    So - the first ‘layer’ of the stack is as thick as the mangled tab, uses the existing tab screw and the two new holes you tap into the case down in the ‘eyebrow’ area and it’s sort of ‘dog leg’ shaped (tab then bending into the eyebrow), then you build up the stack just in the eyebrow area. The tab is gone and the ‘stop’ becomes the built up edge of the stack, not counting the bottom layer. You’d be getting >2 screws (counting the existing screw). If there’s enough clearance nice #8 socket head cap screws. I’m thinking it may not even have to be nice and curved, but more angular if you have the space... thoughts.
  5. mnmlst

    mnmlst mnmlst

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    141A4FFA-476D-43CE-A3F8-8918B910CE12.jpeg
    ER70S-2 and larryboy like this.
  6. franko58

    franko58 Been here awhile Supporter

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    After you have cleaned the case as stated before. Can you get a piece of copper flat bar at least as thick as the piece that you want to replicate. Cut the shape that is needed into the bar. Use solid wire mig or tig to fill the hole in the bar in. After it cools, the bar will pull off leaving the lug in place. I've used this on steel, but it should work with aluminum.
  7. larryboy

    larryboy Stable genius.

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    mnmlst likes this.
  8. DirtMerchant

    DirtMerchant Long timer

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    I'll measure it later today but there is very little clearance between the kickstart gear and that arc shaped casting. This is the gear, the cam shaped attachment impacts the L shaped tab that is screwed down. BTW, that is someone else's pic, mine has not been welded...

    RGV Pic of crank plate.jpeg
  9. smilin'Ed

    smilin'Ed Ed

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    welding helmet - get one with a replaceable battery. mine would die every 5 years or so then I got a Miller with replaceable battery just to kick it on till there was enough current being generated by the solar cells to sustain it and recharge the little battery. But those batteries have a life.
  10. Kikemon

    Kikemon Buffoon Emeritus Supporter

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    I have another esoteric welding question in two parts...

    I was taught that you don't quench the weldment when you are welding up a piece for destructive testing purposes (eg, 3G and 4G stick welding bend test) because quenching will make the piece brittle and could lead to a test failure. This sounds like it is wrong to me for a couple of reasons. First, I would always be quenching it below its critical temperature and I think this shouldn't make it brittle. Also, when we are done welding, we cut the test coupons from the weldment using an oxyfuel torch (track table). The 3/8" thick test coupons get hotter than they do when I weld them when they are cut with the torch. I think that if I let the test coupons cool naturally after they are cut then this would take any hardness out of the metal if I did put some in by quenching it as I was welding it. Does this reasoning make any sense?

    Also, on a related note, I am still in school and have never tested for a job. I realize that when I do test for a job the option to quench or not to quench will probably not come up and I will need to let the piece cool on its own as I put in the various passes. Since laser thermometers are so cheap now ($30 or so), would it be worth getting one to know when I should stop welding to let the piece cool and when it is OK to start up again? Am I over thinking all this?
  11. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    Funny you should say that. Coupons are not quenched. My dad took his NYS DOT welding test. The CWI threw the piece in the snow. He failed for hairline cracks in the bend.

    CWI should not have done that.

    Don't sweat it, an employer wants you to pass the test. Relax, weld the piece and do your best. I don't know if a thermometer is allowed. When I practiced, I learned to wait a minute before the next pass and a few before the next one. You will do so many coupons it will be easy by the time you take the test.

    David
  12. mark1305

    mark1305 Old Enough To Know Better Supporter

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    Just a hobbyist welder since about 1998. For too many years just used a plain Jackson Journeyman and got really tired of trying to keep the MIG gun in place when flipping the helmet down. Few years ago picked up a Hobart auto darkening helmet at Tractor Supply for about $70. Can be switched between welding and grinding mode (I guess so sparks don't flash it dark if grinding something between passes). Unlike some inexpensive helmets I've seen, the batteries can be changed. I really like it. Should have made that move long ago.
  13. Hertz13

    Hertz13 Been here awhile

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    Yeah your reasoning makes sense in certain applications. Realize that all materials, filler metals, and welding processes are not created equally. It’s always best not to quench a coupon that will be tested even if your rational makes sense from a metallurgical standpoint. Why chance it if a potential job/cert is on the line? You’re also not always going to cut it with oxy ace and essentially normalize it.

    It’s good to show up prepared to monitor your interpass temps. It shows you understand that’s a requirement you need to follow on the WPS. IR temp guns are handy and it definitely doesn’t hurt to bring your own, but a prospective employer is going to be able to at least hand you a temp stick when you ask for it.
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  14. eddyturn

    eddyturn Eternal Wannabe Supporter

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  15. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority Supporter

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    "The electricity from the plasma cutter interacted with the battery, which created the release of gas from the battery followed by the explosion, Hanks said."

    Sounds like sparks from the plasma cutter got to the hydrogen from the battery was the cause.
  16. stormdog

    stormdog Long timer

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    Long time ago I was useing a big electric scissor lift to weld in the ceiling of a warehouse.
    Left it plugged in because the batteries were bad and it kept running out of juice.
    Lucky I didn’t rupture an ear drum when the sparks got to the hydrogen
  17. smilin'Ed

    smilin'Ed Ed

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    new lincoln 256 MIG welder. Won't run on new Honda 6500 generator - anybody know why?
    Gen output is 240 volts / tried with idle control on and off / tried at low and high output settings on welder / Gen is good - it will run the other Miller machines I have. Lincoln strikes an arc and immediately shuts off current, release trigger and same thing over and over again.
  18. MJS

    MJS Long timer

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    That Honda is a bit undersized if you're welding at high current. That welder needs a 12kW supply at max output. Is that Honda an inverter generator? I'll speculate that the welder pulls the supply voltage down when you strike the arc and that the Lincoln electronics don't like that. I'm guessing that is a transformer welder and not an inverter welder.

    Can you try the welder with a 10kW rotary (non-inverter) genset? Have you tried the welder at very low settings, i.e. set up for something like 18 gauge? I'm assuming you have used the welder with regular utility power and it works fine?
  19. ABuck99

    ABuck99 0.0

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    Electrical Wiring Guru’s:

    I just acquired a 200A inverter welder and need to install a 6-50 receptacle in the garage to power it. Welder specs: Max inrush is 33.6A @240 and Max input amps is 23A @ 240. 35% duty cycle. Will a 40A circuit be acceptable?

    I have a 60amp sub panel already in the garage that powers some overhead lighting and outlets: fairly under utilized. 6/3 wire feeds the subpanel from the main panel.

    Question: need to see if a 40A 240 circuit in the sub panel to power my welder is acceptable, or do if I need to run a 6/3 or 8/3 dedicated 50A circuit from the main panel to the garage exclusively for the welder? Theres room in the sub panel. Not looking forward to running a dedicated line from the main panel: going to be a colossal pita job running the wire.

    Attached Files:

  20. dbc

    dbc Adventurer

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    Are you the only one working in the garage? No other big power tools running at the same time? If so, your 60a sub panel should be sufficient.
    40a breaker using 8/3 is plenty big enough. Go over your owners manual and the outside of the welder very carefully, they usually spec the feed size. I have a 200a Lincoln inverter tig, I'm running mine on a 2 pole 30a 10/3 (Lincoln spec) set up with no problems over the last few years.
    BTW, I'm an electrician with over 40 years experience, but rarely reply to electrical questions- Too many if's and but's without actually physically seeing the situation in person.
    ABuck99 likes this.