Ask your WELDING questions here.

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by KTM640Dakar, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. ER70S-2

    ER70S-2 Long timer

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    Way to go, David. :thumb

    Hollow? :eek7
  2. blue72beetle

    blue72beetle Look at my Wee

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    Awesome, thank you very much
  3. The Cyclops

    The Cyclops Long timer

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    I have a Hobart 110V MIG, but need a stick from time to time for thicker and dirty stuff. I used to have access to a buddies with the DC option and liked the stability it offered, thinking about a Harbor Freight Commander 225 https://www.harborfreight.com/comma...der-225a-ac-150a-dc-230-volt-input-63620.html . I hear pretty good things about them, but there are a couple of others that are multi process that I am considering. I've never done TIG, but very intrigued by it as I never was able to do very well with AL on my MIG. Here are the others I was considering https://www.harborfreight.com/unlim...cess-welder-with-120240-volt-input-64806.html
    https://www.harborfreight.com/omnip...0240-volt-input-63621.html?_br_psugg_q=welder

    Anyone used any of these? Is TIG that hard to pick up or even needed around the house? In case anyone else is interested they have a coupon good until tomorrow on these (welders are always excluded from the 20% off).
    [​IMG]
  4. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    From my experience.... Tig is easy to learn (kinda like oxy/acet with an electric flame), makes pretty welds with almost no splatter and clean up, but the material must be very clean....no paint, rust, or oxidation and anything other than flat on your table can be hard to get to. I like my tig but miss the convenience of stick and the ease and quick set up of mig. Some tigs will do stick as well.
  5. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    ***************************************************************************
    but need a stick from time to time for thicker and dirty stuff. I used to have access to a buddies with the DC option and liked the stability it offered,
    ****************************************************************************

    First, who told you stick is for dirty metal? Clean everyting before you weld. Dirty makes for porosity and generally crappy looking welds.

    Next, almost any DC welder will TIG. Scratch start, no foot pedal. It can be one with argon and a tig torch hooked to the negative terminal. I have done it many times.

    Have fun
    David
  6. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority Supporter

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    Back in the 70's I had a job welding stainless restaurant equipment, my machine was a big old Hobart arc welder with a water cooled Tig torch handle set up. The torch handle had a switch to a solenoid that turned the gas on and off. Sc

    Hobart 001.jpg

    If you've got a TIG machine, try hooking up a arc welding rod handle, it gives you the chance to use HF start and a throttle!
  7. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

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    No idea how well those would work on Alu with a spool gun but as a reasonably experienced DIY stick welder, I found TIG quite easy to learn on steel. I got a 200A AC/DC machine so I can TIG Alu, it has DC stick too. Aluminium took some practice but it's not too bad. Study up on the basics & recommended settings & have at it on a rainy weekend... Foot pedal control makes welding Alu hugely easier & it's also really nice on steel, especially the smaller fiddly jobs. The versatility of the TIG is great, just flick a switch, swap a tungsten & pick up a different rod to change material. Really good on little motorcycle sized jobs, slower than MIG on bigger things but IMHO there's less chance of making a bad weld as you are watching it melt in as you go. Good out of position as long as you can fit everything into the space.

    Cheers
    Clint
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  8. blue72beetle

    blue72beetle Look at my Wee

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    Put the crash bars on. The extended bolt worked great, thanks a bunch David.

    [​IMG]
    ER70S-2 and thewbee like this.
  9. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    YW


    David
  10. AwDang

    AwDang Long timer

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    Tips needed for dissimilar thickness MIG.

    I have a Lincoln 100 with gas and .028 wire. I’m going to make some saddle bag supports out of .025 mild steel rod, then tab them to the bike with cut pieces of 16g sheet metal. My experience with this machine has been doing floor pans and other same thickness material up to .125

    Any recommendations for settings and technique?
  11. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    .023 wire?

    Favor the heavier metal. It shoold weld the tabs on to the .250 ? rod quite well. Point the wire more at the rod making sure you get enough on the tabs. Practice with the gun so you can go around the round stock in one or two motions. Run it hot.

    David
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  12. stormdog

    stormdog Long timer

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    If your Lincoln is the same as mine, there are base line settings for wire type and material thickness inside the door.
  13. AwDang

    AwDang Long timer

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    There are, and they work great when I’m using the same size materials.
  14. Dagofast

    Dagofast Full giggety ahead.

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    What I do when in doubt is to lay down some test beads using remnants of the material to arrive at a good setting. Then you can confidently weld up your fabricated pieces.
  15. Mini Trail

    Mini Trail n°°b

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    What is the standard plug & outlet for welders? I bought a cheap stick welder that didn't come with a plug. I tried to research what plug & outlet to use but couldn't find anything. I ended up with a dryer cord. I looked at a Lincoln welder at the hardware store & it has the plug in the picture. I think it may be called NEMA 14-30? But I'll be cracked it I can find a wall outlet to match.
    20190630_161934.jpg
  16. DSM8

    DSM8 Where fun goes to die....

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    Typically you want to use a 50 amp 220 that plug has one of the blade perpendicular to the other
    Depends what amp draw your welder needs my tig requires a 100amp 220 circuit so it needs a 100amp plug which is a whole nuther beast but if your uses a 50amp circuit then the one they sell at home depot will work show em this pic and ask for the corresponding outlet thats the plug side

    Attached Files:

    Strong Bad likes this.
  17. Mini Trail

    Mini Trail n°°b

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    Thanks for that. It looks like the 650p is what would work for that Lincoln. They did not have that at the HD but they did have one like the 630p. I couldn't help but notice that neither of them has a blade perpendicular to the other.

    Any idea if the 650 plug would fit a 4 prong 50A RV outlet? I already have that on site.
  18. DSM8

    DSM8 Where fun goes to die....

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    No idea never looked at rv plugs more concerned about amp ratings so keep that in mind
    Here is a 100amp plug for reference

    https://www.elecdirect.com/pin-slee...plug-100a-125-250vac-3-pole-4-wire-watertight
  19. Zahnarzt

    Zahnarzt Crashes Much

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    Which is more important in small, thin walled welds, volts /amps and feed speed or wire thickness.

    I'm wanting to weld frames and gussets to frames and my buddy has a Lincoln 215 shielded and I just couldn't get a nice small bead.
  20. DSM8

    DSM8 Where fun goes to die....

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    Actually it is a combination of both thin walled material needs smaller diameter wire and corresponding amps/wire speed.

    So really to know more like what are the material thickness we’re talking about and I assume not exotic also when doing tubing then we start talking about purging which changes the welding dynamics