Ask your WELDING questions here.

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by KTM640Dakar, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    About one amp per thousandth of a inch. 1/16 or .0625” would be about 62 amps which is not even selectable. About 18.6 volts with .023 wire using C/25. Approximately 120 inches per minute. One more volt for Co2.

    For thin stuff, use smallest wire.

    C/25 makes for less burn through compared to Co2.

    Your 215 will do it.

    I just reread your post. Shielded? Use the smallest wire you can get. NR 211 MP is good. I would not use over .030.

    David
  2. MJS

    MJS Long timer

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    Me thinks you meant .0625? :hmmmmm
  3. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    Yep
    Edited
  4. Zahnarzt

    Zahnarzt Crashes Much

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    Thanks for the info.

    I did not check the wire size when I was there, just went to practive on some stuff.

    I'll check when I go back.
  5. Zahnarzt

    Zahnarzt Crashes Much

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    So I will only be welding dirt bike frames.

    I do a lot of repairs on olDer bikes and there is always a tab or bracket broken off.

    Sometimes the frames are hairline cracked from abuse.
    It would be really nice if I could fix an alumin case as well.
    I think that is a spool gun atachment ??
  6. ADV8

    ADV8 Long timer

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    Here is a question and seems like a great place to ask.

    With 949cc pistons the Moto Guzzi crankshaft needed either a ton of material removed off the connecting rod big ends or tungsten/Mallory metal inserts to add weight.
    After drilling a hole with a ARTU drill I now need to T.I.G weld the plug to keep it in place but what filler wire is going to be suitable ?

    thumbnail_Image-82.jpg
  7. PeterW

    PeterW Long timer

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    I think you'll find those are generally peened. Even welding is going to be the same as peening if it works. Tungsten won't fuse at anything like normal temps so all you'd be doing is putting a cap on it, one which is likely to crack and the heat will screw up the crank. Grind small notches into the insert so there's something to peen into and have at it with a hammer and punch.

    I'll concede I'd like to be wrong there :)
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  8. ADV8

    ADV8 Long timer

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    Thanks for the reply Peter, by trade I am a Boilermaker/Welder but can't say I have had to do anything like this material wise.
    The engine balance shop could not drill it so said I would look into it having a small lathe and mill (as BM's do. :lol3)

    That crankshaft material was super hard all the way through and not sure it would peen over without fracturing.

    In hindsight I would have used a 12 mm ARTU drill and stoned honed to 1/2' ID size for a 0005" interference fit with Loctite but a bit late now, if the pin came adrift and moved inward it would be a tad messy with the engine running.
  9. PeterW

    PeterW Long timer

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    Melting point of tungsten is ~3400 C. It's not going to fuse with a normal TIG weld. It's fairly hard as well, you might be able to knurl it to turn it into an interference fit then push it in and back that up with one of the gap filling loctites.

    I'd suggest practicing with something like cast iron if you go that way. You can sometimes find chunks of old railway line. The trick will be not cracking the crank so precision is needed.

    I don't think bronze or silver solder will stick to tungsten but those might be worth trying. If you can get either of those to stick to the tungsten you can flow it around, turn it down until it's very thin push it in then braze it into place.
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  10. DSM8

    DSM8 Where fun goes to die....

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    One method would be to have the tungsten just below the surface then tigweld a lip around the hole that will behave like the peen you can weld in four small tabs on the crank then apply the green seeping locktight after it cools.
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  11. ADV8

    ADV8 Long timer

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    I think that is exactly what I will do so will need to find a compatible filler wire maybe even S/S.
  12. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority Supporter

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  13. DSM8

    DSM8 Where fun goes to die....

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    It has to compatible with the crank material not the plug if forged you should be able to use standard filler or stainless 309 iirc work well and flows really nice for this kind of application if the crank is cast
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  14. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    Stainless or pure nickel for cast. Stainless like 309L for small jobs. Bigger jobs it cracks next to the weld. This is just to hold the pin in. So I think either would be fine.

    David
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  15. DSM8

    DSM8 Where fun goes to die....

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    Thats my thinking if cast the 309 will basically replicate a peen in function I have done similar on cast iron which was non structural
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  16. greasyfatman

    greasyfatman Long timer

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    Would loctite 660 quick metal do it?
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  17. vtwin

    vtwin Air cooled runnin' mon

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    Hi everyone. I had a Home Depot Lincoln Weldpak 100 and it worked fine for what I needed it for. I did want to expand out of Flux core and into MIG. I looked into getting a gas setup for the little Lincoln, but it was over $200.

    PB180247.JPG

    I sold this good little welder for this..

    PB180246.JPG

    I spent a little over $100 plus what I sold the Lincoln for. I thought I got a good deal, but the Hobart 135 proved to be problematic. I only used it twice. The next time I tried to use it, the AMP switch got stuck and broke the knob. It also stopped feeding and working. The fan comes on, but nothing else. I banged on the relays and it now feeds. Still, no sparkles. I bought one of those control panels kits that the "Hobart Welders Forum" and seem to indicate this is a common problem. I also ordered a new switch, new from Miller. The first vendor I contacted took over 1 month jerking me around, "No, it didn't come in call me friday" "No it didn't come in today, call me monday" ad nauseum. I gave up on this unreliable company and ordered it over the phone from another company. It was here a week later. Well, it still comes on, fan on, wire feeds, not welding. That Hobart 140 is looking better and better, especially for under $500 from Northern Tool with free shipping. Eastwood 135 for under $300 on sale looks good as well. Any suggestions?
  18. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    You should have kept the Lincoln

    Hobart 140 is a great machine

    David
  19. vtwin

    vtwin Air cooled runnin' mon

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    I was looking at the Lincoln 140 as well.
  20. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    I have used the Hobart 140 and I even did an extensive amp test on it because you can't get 140 amps out of a 110 receptacle.

    All my welders are RED. I had one of the first SP100 purchased in 1985 up until about 3 years ago when the fan was dying.

    I have 7 lincoln welders and 3 wire feeders. I do have a miller Passport which is a kick ass welder especially when used as it was intended.

    Never used the Lincoln 140. If it comes with a 3 year warranty, you can't go wrong. I own a welding shop and these get used every day.

    My last purchase was the 200 amp AC DC TIG inverter. It replaced my arcmaster 200 which replaced my Arcmaster 185. They seem to last about 7 years under heavy use.

    All these red machines and I use a miller helmet.

    David