Ask your WELDING questions here.

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by KTM640Dakar, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. NitroAcres

    NitroAcres MotoBiggots Suck Supporter

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    ZhangXiaoLiang that is so nice to see you progress and make a Good Living On Your Own....:-)
    Very Impressive, The Spirit of Your Soul, I am sure your family is very proud of you.
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  2. vtwin

    vtwin Air cooled runnin' mon

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    A concrete shop floor will make your life a lot easier I would think Zhang.:D
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  3. Tripletreat

    Tripletreat Long timer

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    I need to have two 1/4 in. stainless steel plates welded. Is there some special challenge involved in welding stainless that is going to require a search for a specialized welder for this small job? TIA
  4. Hertz13

    Hertz13 Been here awhile

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    need more info. Type of stainless? what are the service requirements of this weld (what do you need it to do or withstand)? Thinking about doing it yourself? If so, what equipment do you have available.
  5. Tripletreat

    Tripletreat Long timer

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    I am not a welder and I have no plans to become one at present. It would be nice to learn, but under present circumstances... nope! I don't know what kind of stainless steel it is, but I can tell you it's destined to be a bracket for a side stand on a 500 lb. motorcycle. This much I do know: it's damned hard. I tried and failed to cut it out with a hand saw and then a cutting wheel. Could not do it. I had a machine shop cut out on a water jet cutter.
  6. stormdog

    stormdog Long timer

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    Stainless is both hard and soft.
    It cuts hard requiring higher feed pressure at lower speed to avoid work hardening
    It is a soft metal susceptible to bending and fatigue cracking.
    I’d take it back to the machine shop that cut it out. They should be able to weld it.
  7. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    Most machine shops around here know nothing about welding.
  8. Luke

    Luke GPoET&P

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    The equipment for 1/4" stainless is as basic as it comes, any shop that takes small jobs can do that. They'll want to know the alloy so they can choose the right filler rod to use.

    Regardless, just call some shops and ask until you find one that says yes. They know what they can do.
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  9. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    They make stainless stick rod for maintenance. It will blend with most stainless.

    For pretty, TIG is the way to go.

    316 works on a lot of common stuff.

    David
  10. crazybrit

    crazybrit Long timer

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    I'm trying to weld some 20ga stainless sheet. I read some recommendations to use pulse mode to limit the heat [i'm finding it easy to burn through]

    Anyone have any thoughts? My Thermal Arc 186 welder has the following pulse options:

    -- High Current - This parameter sets the High weld current when in PULSE mode.
    -- Low Current - The lowest point in the pulse is called the Low Current.
    -- Pulse Width - This parameter sets the percentage on time of the PULSE FREQUENCY for High weld current when the PULSE is ON.
    -- Pulse Frequency - This parameter sets the PULSE FREQUENCY when the PULSE is ON.

    I'm using 0.040" tungsten and 0.045" rod.
  11. SnowMule

    SnowMule still learning what is and isn't edible Super Supporter

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    Sounds like you've got all the settings available to make that waveform look like whatever you want.
    [​IMG]

    If you're having an issue with burn-through, shorter pulse width and longer pulse freq will decrease the duty cycle.
    Low current I'd set to just over what the machine needs to hold the arc.
    High current i'd set to maybe 120% of what you'd use for CC process.
  12. DSM8

    DSM8 Where fun goes to die....

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    Read up on this page
  13. David R

    David R I been called a Nut Job..

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    You could try 1/2 hZ or so. Use the pulses to time your dips.

    What type of joint?

    I had a 186. It will do the job. Warpage is my biggest problem.

    At the recommended one amp for one thousandths of an inch in one pass, you are only at 20 amps. You can turn that up and use pulse.

    On welding web, we had a thread on welding soda cans. It can be done, the trick is put the heat to the filler, not the can.

    David
  14. crazybrit

    crazybrit Long timer

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    Did you mean to include a link?

    Hmmn. I was imagining a lot higher than this.

    Ideally butt but it may end up being lap. I'm going to argon back fill.

    I've read this is usually derated 1/3 for stainless (uprated for AL). So 0.67A per 1 thou. I wasn't sure how it impacts the min/max values for pulse, from SnowMules recommendation above, high would be 38 thou * 0.67 * 1.2 or around 30A.

    Best frequency and pulse width were my main questions.

    I keep meaning to practice this.
  15. crazybrit

    crazybrit Long timer

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    This is an interesting video. 120A. Low frequency. No filler of course, just tacking. Lots to experiment with I guess.

  16. DSM8

    DSM8 Where fun goes to die....

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  17. crazybrit

    crazybrit Long timer

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  18. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority Supporter

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    I personally don't use the pulse, I'll control the heat with the peddle, arc length and rod. Pretty hard to give advice without knowing what you are welding. I say skip the pulse and learn that crutch on mild steel. Learn to weld Stainless first and then get fancy if you need to later.


    When welding 20 gauge you should be tacking (without rod) every 1/8 to 1/4 inch to help eliminate warping. Welding a flat sheet butt weld needs a backing plate or at least purge the back side. This is how I tacked up some SS work I did last year. I didn't back purge but I did have a chunk of aluminum as a backing plate:

    SS tacks.JPG

    Partially done.JPG

    SS finished.JPG

    Depending on what it is you are welding you may not have to use rod, but your fitment needs to per perfect.

    Use a super fine pointed tungsten and keep it really close to the work if you dip it, stop and clean it immediately. Clean the part with Denatured alcohol before you start tacking and if you are going to use rod wipe the rod with alcohol too.
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  19. DonM

    DonM Do-dah Do-dah Supporter

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    Damn! Nice.

    What does this creation do?
  20. crazybrit

    crazybrit Long timer

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    No kidding. The color of the welds in last pic is beautiful