Assembling a complete kit to repair flats & replace tubed tires (BestRest, Motion Pro and MotoPumps)

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Anby, May 27, 2020.

  1. Anby

    Anby Been here awhile

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    Hi everybody,

    I am trying to assemble a complete kit to do roadside flat repairs and change tires on my own. After some research I have found some products that are rated highly by many inmates.

    As someone who had never fixed a flat before, my first consideration in kit selection is the ease of doing the job. Of course I want something durable that will survive some falls on a motorcycle and cheaper is always prefered. I ride a 2005 F650GS thumper, and almost all of my rides are solo.

    What would be your pick out of the following items? If you know of a product that works equally well and cheaper, please share.

    Finally, am I missing any items (other than skills) to do the job?

    Thanks,
    Anby

    1) MotoPumps air shot ($59) vs BestRest CyclePump Expedition ($115) tire inflator
    https://www.motopumps.com/shop/air-shot
    https://bestrestproducts.com/shop/c...-inflator/cyclepump-expedition-tire-inflator/

    Note: Leaning towards MotoPumps Air Shot due to lower cost. Any idea how the pumps compare in operation/durability?

    2) BestRest CyclePump Tire Repair Kit ($30)
    https://bestrestproducts.com/shop/c...ire-inflator/cyclepump-tire-repair-kit-tubed/

    3) BestRest TireIron BeadBrakR kit ($230) vs Motion Pro BeadPro™ Tire Bead Breaker and Lever Tool Set ($65)
    https://bestrestproducts.com/shop/beadbrakr-tcm/beadbrakr-tibb-steel-irons-w-tcm-2/
    https://www.motionpro.com/product/08-0519

    Note: Leaning heavily towards Motion Pro here due to the massive cost difference.

    4) BestRest pressure gauge ($40) vs Motion Pro pressure gauge ($97)
    https://bestrestproducts.com/shop/c...edition-tire-inflator/cyclepump-ez-air-gauge/
    https://www.motionpro.com/product/08-0402

    Note: Leaning towards BestRest. Wonder why the one by Motion Pro is soo expensive.
    #1
  2. brianbrannon

    brianbrannon They'll ride up with wear

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    $8 Milton pencil gauge is your huckleberry.
    I use the dynaplug version of the airshot to air up after offroading
    #2
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  3. Migolito

    Migolito Prognosticator and MotoYogi

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    On a ride last weekend into the southern Sequoia NF, one in my group got a flat not 5 minutes into the ride. He put on a friggin clinic on how to change out a tire-I wish I had filmed the magic. It was a notoriously hard to change Tractionator HT w/a HD tube. Because of the piece of long steel that penetrated the tire/tube, he had to pull the tire off the rim. He changed out tubes and we road. He absolutely NEEDED a pair of pliers to pull out the steel. I carry small vise grips for such things.

    So, he didn't need a bead breaker. He didn't need a really accurate Air Guage. Just the standard pencil guage. He didn't need an electric pump, but, used one anyway. What he did need was 3 tire irons-2 with handle, 1 plain iron. A tube and tire patch kit, and a stem pull. and used the screw on cap to the tube to pull the stem, and an Endurostar trail stand (http://www.endurostar.com/)

    What I take (and I run no tubes). Motopumps, CO2 w/3 large cans (105 gm), Tire patch kit just in case I need to also patch the tubeless tire, 8 plugs and plug tools new tube of glue (large), 3 tire irons, 2 electric guages (1 in kit, 1 in tank bag), trail stand. I also have my shampoo for lube.

    Basically, you need a way to completely remove the tire from the rim...JIC. A way to add some air, and a way to patch not just the tube but the tire and a way to lay the bike over or a stand.
    #3
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  4. sieg

    sieg Wearing out tires......2 at a time, day after day. Supporter

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    With tube tires you need this stem fishing tool not the one that comes with the BestRest kit.
    https://www.ebay.com/i/153794708406...1291&msclkid=29f3b805f24d1f93940fe6cb0ebc8fbf

    Pump; buy the small one...……...and carry a bicycle pump for back up.

    Tyr irns; get the ones with axle and bead lock wrench.
    https://www.denniskirk.com/motion-p...ombo-lever-set-08-0589.p284175.prd/284175.sku

    Gauge; some cheap one in the pocket of every one of my MC jackets.

    Patch kit, front tube, trail stand if you don't have a center stand.
    #4
  5. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    For tubless and car tires, I have the cheapest compressors I can find. 10-15 bucks. The first thing I do to every vehicle I own is put a tire plug emergency kit in it. The one for the bike I remove all the plastic case parts for ease of storing.

    Get a sticky worm plug kit with T handle awl and plug insertion tool. 3-7 bucks for the kit, including tools, plugs and glue.

    One other point, when the tube of glue is opened, it'll dry up in a month or 2. I buy mini tubes and have a few extra on hand and a couple in each vehicle.

    #5
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  6. Anby

    Anby Been here awhile

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    Do you like your airshot?
    And how accurate are these pencil gauges? Sometime back I had bought one (not a pencil type) from a car parts store and it showed me a reading of 52 psi, while the one at the gas station had shown 34 psi.

    I will add a pair of pliers to the kit. Going by the description, my guess is your friend is an expert, which I am not by a long shot.
    What exactly do you mean by 3 tire irons? I am not sure I quite understand. I was under the impression that you need 3 irons. You could use two of the bead brakers, so basically one more iron would suffice?
    I am planning on carrying two CO2 cartridges, just in case the pump fails.
    Do you have any recommendation for the stem fishing tool?

    Got a center stand, got gauge in my tank bag. Will carry two CO2 cartridges as backup.
    This is the valve stem fishing tool right? Good point in getting the axle wrench. What is the bead lock wrench?
    [​IMG]

    I am running tubed tires on my F650GS thumper.
    #6
  7. sieg

    sieg Wearing out tires......2 at a time, day after day. Supporter

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    Yeap that the fishing tool you want pictured above. It screws into the internal threads of the stem, and will fit through the stem hole in the rim. The one pictured with the Best Rest looks like one that screws on the external threads of the stem, and therefore will not fit through the hole in the rim, it is for installing a new stem for a tubeless tire.
    Rim locks (I mistakenly called them bead locks) clamp the tire to the rim so you can run very low pressure or even completely flat without the tire slipping on the rim. Typically they have a 12mm nut. But if you don't run them you won't need the 12mm wrench so don't worry.
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  8. Anby

    Anby Been here awhile

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    Got it, thanks. I am not 100% sure if I would be running super low pressure, I am pretty new to adventure riding in the desert. It looks like rim locks require another hole in the rim for the lock stem to come out, I am not even sure if my bike rims have got it.

    upload_2020-5-28_18-47-27.jpeg
    #8
  9. sieg

    sieg Wearing out tires......2 at a time, day after day. Supporter

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    Most rims have the extra hole with a plug in it. It's nice to be able to ride on a flat for a few miles if you have too, without it you are stopped immediately with a flat on a tubed tire.
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  10. adv_sacrifice

    adv_sacrifice Been here awhile

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    Valve stem fishing tools seem silly to carry. Never needed one to get a tube in. Just stick your hand in there and push it in place.

    The motion pro beadbreaker irons work well for getting the bead popped but they do lack a bit of curve on the spoon side to really grab the wheel well. So id bring a nicer spoon as well.

    I have a drc foot pump. If youre on the trail then id just use a basic tire pressure gauge like an auto one. No need to be super precise
    #10
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  11. Grreatdog

    Grreatdog Long timer Supporter

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    I really prefer CO2. But after having to scramble to find cartridges after a five flat weekend, I switched to a Motopumps Airshot.

    It is small enough to zip tie inside the airbox of my EXC. So far it has been plenty reliable.
    #11
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  12. Motopsychoman

    Motopsychoman Not a total poseur Supporter

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    A lot of the same things others have recommended. I ride for weeks at a time, so my gear is pretty extensive. My kit has all of the following:
    1. 30"x30" piece of blue tarp to work on. Keeping sand and dirt out of the wheel bearings and the tire beads is important.
    2. MotionPro Bead Breaker FS. The longer, steel levers are great leverage for getting difficult 50/50 tires on and off the rims.
    3. MotionPro T6 combo lever. My third tire spoon, doesn't gouge the rims and doubles as my rear axle nut wrench.
    4. Plastic rim protectors. I use several .050" thick strips of UHMW plastic, but 1" strips cut from an old bleach bottle work well also.
    5. MotionPro Bead Buddy II. Just added to my kit, only used once but worked really well and sped up mounting a 50/50 tire.
    6. 4oz squeeze bottle of RuGlyde. Good lube makes all the difference. Enough to mount a few tires.
    7. Motopumps AirShot. Robust and pretty quick inflator. Nice feature allows checking tire pressure without removing the pump.
    8. Tire gauge. Repeatability is more important than accuracy. I use an Accutire MS 4710B. Easy to read and fits valves in cramped spaces.
    9. A Nealey plug kit for tubeless tires.
    10. A Slime tire patch kit for tube-type tires. Always carry a fresh, unopened tube of rubber cement. Toss once opened.
    11. A generic valve stem fishing tool for tube-type tires. Speeds up the process and saves my fingers.
    12. A 68gm CO2 inflator. My last-ditch effort to seat a really stubborn tubeless tire bead.
    13. A pair of leather work gloves. Changing tires is hard on the hands.
    My spare parts always include a couple of valve cores and extra metal valve caps.
    Tire tools make up more than 40% of the tool weight I carry.

    I change all my own tires at home and use all the same gear. The only tool I use at home that I don't carry on the bikes is my 2.5HP 4 gal Porter-Cable air compressor.
    #12
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  13. GravelRider

    GravelRider AKA max384 Supporter

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    I know you've never changed a flat before, but have you ever changed your own tires? If you haven't, practice at home in your garage with whatever tools you have on hand. Just take the tire and tube off and put them back on, you'll learn a lot about the tools you'll need, and you want to do it a couple of times at home before you need the skill on the trail. That's not the best time to learn to spoon tires on and off.

    For my bike with tubeless tires, the bead breaks so easily that I don't bother bringing along a bead breaker; just two small tire spoons (the motion pro combination spoon/axle wrench linked somewhere above). However, other tire/wheel combos will require some sort of bead breaker (or a buddy with a side stand). If you change it in your garage first, you'll know whether you need one or not.

    For an air compressor, I've got a $15 cheapo Amazon one I've had for ten years and probably fifteen or more flats, and it's still going strong. I also keep a very small bicycle hand pump just in case it craps out on me.

    I definitely suggest using a cheap stick air gauge. No need spending money for a super accurate one for a trailside repair. Hell, most people could air up reasonably accurately just by feel in comparison to the other tire. I'm not suggesting this method, just saying.

    That valve stem fishing tool is worth it's weight in gold IMO. It's not completely necessary, but a nice luxury considering the small size and weight.

    Once you get all your tools you're going to carry, change your tire in your garage using only those tools you plan to carry on your bike. You'll soon know if you've got an adequate setup or not.
    #13
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  14. tbarstow

    tbarstow Two-wheelin' Fool Super Supporter

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    Slime pump, motion-pro combo axle wrench tire lever, 2 more longer motion-pro levers, some baby powder to help the tube in, Gearwrench Quad-box wrench, for the pinch bolts and rim lock, valve stem fishing tool.

    Then practice at home before you need to do it in the field.
    #14
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  15. Grinnin

    Grinnin Forever N00b Supporter

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    I have a 12V pump and it works fine.

    I really prefer shorty Mt. Bike pumps. I have a few of them and they're small and cheap enough to leave on different bikes. Much quieter than electric and inflate in about the same amount of time. Quicker get out and to put away.

    I have repaired many flats and inflated to enough pressure to seat the bead with just those pumps. If I had 160-width tires, it would probably be too much exercise, but the bikes I ride usually have 100-width up front and 120 or 130 in the rear. For example, 120/90-18.

    One of those pumps is #3 in this photo.

    ToolsAndSpares.JPG


    If your bike doesn't have a center-stand, you may want a prop for the right side. That's #1 in the photo. There are folding and telescoping versions available but this is just an old 1/2" tent pole.
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  16. Anby

    Anby Been here awhile

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    Yes, I am adding MotionPro T6 combo lever as @Motopsychoman has recommended.

    I will carry a couple of cartridges as backup for the Motopumps Airshot (decided on it).

    Thanks for the detailed answer. What is a plastic rim protector, and would it interfere with the bead setting? Can you show a photo of it on your F650GS?
    And what is the purpose of the rubber cement?

    The only tires I have changed are on bicycles and an old Vespa scooter some 10-15 years back. Never changed any tire on my motorcycles in the past. I am certainly planning to take the current half worn Tourances tires on and off a couples of times for practice. Once I get the process right, I will put on the Anakee Wilds I have been thinking of getting. I will get the valve stem fishing tool, it seems tiny and I am planning to get anything that saves hassle on the trailside.

    Which longer Motion Pro wrenches do you use?
    I did get a Gedore Red kit, and a couple of torque wrenches to do DIY jobs on the motorcycle. I wonder if I should keep the Gedore kit at home and get a set to keep with the bike all the time.
    I have not seen anyone on this thread mention the torque wrenches yet. When you mount the wheels after tire replacement, they have to be torqued to spec right? Or do people do it the old fashioned way of tightening until it feels right?

    Thanks for showing your setup. My bike does have a centerstand. What is the total weight of your setup? And what re those bolts in #12?
    #16
  17. Grreatdog

    Grreatdog Long timer Supporter

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    Motion Pro rim protectors (there are at least two kinds) are all the rage now that everyone has black wheels. I have them but usually don't bother.

    I torque my rear wheel to a grunt and a stomp.

    I just lay the bike on it's side for flat repairs - even when I had a centerstand because it's always the front plus I don't like fiddling with crap I don't need.

    Motion Pro T6 levers rock but are easily chewed up - buy a cheap steel spoon and steel axle wrench for home and save the MP's for the trail.

    Some relative weights.......

    IMG_20181210_192119963.jpg IMG_20181210_192201224.jpg IMG_20181210_192407014.jpg IMG_20181210_192950802.jpg IMG_20181210_193020519.jpg

    How tightly I can pack my whole tool kit minus the tube .......

    IMG_20181215_192851_HDR.jpg IMG_20181215_192946_HDR.jpg
    #17
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  18. adv_sacrifice

    adv_sacrifice Been here awhile

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    Center stand wont do you much good unless you can get somewhere flat and solid. Be prepared to lay your bike on the side.

    If youve never changed a tire then definitely practice. Tubes can be pinched.
    Agreed. Rim protectors take space and imo a hassle to work with. Your rims are going to get scratched offroad anyways.
    #18
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  19. Motopsychoman

    Motopsychoman Not a total poseur Supporter

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    The "rim protectors" are just plastic strips about 1" wide x 4" long that you try to keep between the rim and the tire iron when levering the bead over. Keeps from rim from getting too torn up.

    Rubber cement is just the little tubes of tire patch cement for inner tubes.
    #19
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  20. tbarstow

    tbarstow Two-wheelin' Fool Super Supporter

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    The motion pro 11" set work well on the bike.

    https://www.motionpro.com/product/08-0006
    #20