Aus Plane Wrecks, where are they, plan them into a ride

Discussion in 'Australia' started by BygDaddee, Apr 27, 2019.

  1. grub61

    grub61 mild mannered maniac

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    A Lockheed Hudson crashed in Nov 1942 on Bong Bong mtn west of Dapto , near Wollongong. Apparently there are occasional guided walks to the site with the Illawarra Historical Society , however I have been told there is basically very little left in the heavy bush due to the plane having depth charges onboard that exploded and the authorities cleaned up the area as best they could at the time. A street in the new estate below has been called Lockheed Hudson dr. 4 young men lost their lives that day , lest we forget.

    Graham
    #81
  2. gavmac

    gavmac Been here awhile

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    My Father in law (who only died 18 months ago at 92) was in the same mob for the DC3, another one crashed at Cooktown. He was an air force w/o co-pilot. They ran a courier service between Archerfield in Brisbane & Manilla supporting General MacArthur. It was run like a pony express, the planes landed & refuelled at various points & then continued with a new crew to the next stop, the arriving crew departing on the next run.
    They used to carry some passengers or freight including fruit & veggies, 44 gal drums of oil etc. They had a DC2 as well as various DC3's , C49 & C51 versions. Some civilian registered, others USAAF, but always an ANA captain & RAAF co-pilot. The planes used to return to Essendon for maintenance.
    #82
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  3. Dean Ohlin

    Dean Ohlin inner city elite Supporter

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    #83
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  4. BygDaddee

    BygDaddee Where do I get a pie

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    #84
    stumps, Dean Ohlin and sidetrack one like this.
  5. Dean Ohlin

    Dean Ohlin inner city elite Supporter

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    #85
  6. glitch_oz

    glitch_oz Long timer

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    #86
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  7. Dean Ohlin

    Dean Ohlin inner city elite Supporter

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    This one at Palmwoods doesn't look like it'd be too hard to find.

    [​IMG]
    #87
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  8. Sebastionbear

    Sebastionbear Oh! heck...

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    #88
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  9. Dean Ohlin

    Dean Ohlin inner city elite Supporter

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    guess only but I wonder if the pilot was trying to find that old airstrip on the right between Hart's homestead and the bottom of the range?
    #89
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  10. Woody2627

    Woody2627 Grey Wobbler

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    My father might have helped build that, he was involved in airfield construction around there before we went to Borneo.
    When we went to the cape we asked a local tour guide why there were so many plane wrecks on the west coast of the cape. He said the Tanks came in to Brisbane before they were deployed to New Guinea, then sent North. Just keep Oz to your left and you will get there, they were told, so they did. Up they went, round the corner, then back down, with Oz still on their left, until they ran out of fuel. Good yarn, don't know about the truth of it though.
    #90
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  11. MultiDV8

    MultiDV8 Been here awhile

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    According to the ATSB report he had little or no idea where he was. Other aircraft were relaying his radio traffic with Brisbane control and they sent a helicopter out from Maroochydore to look for him while he was s till in the air. I rode along Hart Rd a couple of hours before the crash and fog was almost down to the road level. He had no instrument flight capability and without visibility he was in trouble. He was disoriented and went into the hill at full power.
    #91
  12. richo360

    richo360 Long timer

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    Thanks Sebastionbear, that ATSB link caused me to look this up:

    https://www.atsb.gov.au/media/5226403/197901353.pdf

    My uncle Barry Green was one of the fatalities, ripper of a bloke he was, larger than life. Remember him coming over when I was kid in the 1970's, with a playboy lifestyle, drove a green valiant charger, had a Merv mo and lamb chop sideburns, legend.
    They were flying to Qld to surprise a friend, they had a friend of one of the guys daughters' with them, she survived in the wreckage with 2 badly broken legs until it was found.
    Remember we were on Christmas holidays when told, both mum and dad were pretty distraught.
    #92
  13. Mackers

    Mackers Adventurer

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    In 1940, An Avron Anson crashed on the north face of Mt Torbreck, near Eildon Weir. There was some wreckage nearby when I visited in 1984. I understand that a walking track into the site has been built by volunteers.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    More details: https://www.ozatwar.com/ozcrashes/vic88.htm
    #93
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  14. Phil_Fong

    Phil_Fong Over Regulated Supporter

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    [​IMG]

    R4006 Mark I Dual Control RAF History:
    25/02/40 9 MU, RAF Cosford,
    17/10/40 47 MU, RAF Sealand,
    14/11/40 To RAAF.
    RAAF History:
    Currently Researching
    Served with 1 Bombing & Air Gunnery School, Evans Head.
    Crashed at Moss Vale, NSW, on delivery flight to No.1 Bombing and Gunnery School on 11/02/41.
    The wreckage was relocated in early 1995. Crew; F/Lt HW Ross.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I researched and found this site just out of Moss Vale some years ago. Actually needed the help of local Moto riders to locate the wreckage. Bush fires have consumed most of the fuselage but everything else was still there.

    Air Force has a sign there now in respect of the crew of 2. Hard to believe a plane can crash so close to town 1941 and isn't located until 1995.
    #94
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  15. llewdaert

    llewdaert Been here awhile

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    Anyone from Evans Head??


    Not A wreck, but it was close, and may be interesting to aircraft aficionados
    #95
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  16. llewdaert

    llewdaert Been here awhile

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    Mirage emergency landing at Evans Head.



    On the 16th April, 1969, a Mirage (A3-4) was conducting manoeuvres at the Evans Head Weapons Range when it encountered fuel problems. 76 Squadron had been engaged in an operational low level navigation exercise involving sections of four aircraft, a pull–up from low level to 15,000 feet in order to drop two live 500Lb MK 82 bombs on the Range, followed by a landing at RAAF Amberley. The exercise with live weapons was designed to simulate an actual combat situation associated with 76 Squadron’s responsibilities in the Ground Attack role.



    To provide as much realism as possible the low level navigation phase required the use of 376 gallon drop tanks. As the Mirage had been designed as a Cold War high level interceptor the fitting of drop tanks was an after thought which meant that the fuel system was difficult to manage. In fact it was a cow, so much so that one of the pilots failed to detect that one of his drop tanks had not fed. This meant that when he got to Evans Head he suddenly realized that he did not have enough fuel to get to Amberley.



    After getting the fuel flow procedure quite wrong, Jack "Sniffy" Hayden" then did all the right things and put the Mirage down in one piece on the runway at Evans Head. Actually it was feat in itself when the very high final approach speed, 195 Knots (230 MPH) of the Mirage and the length of the Evans Head runway is considered. It required an awful lot of pressure on the toe brakes which resulted in it severely damaging the Dunlops. The runway at Evans Head is only 4,275 ft in length (1,300m) which is a bit short as the Mirage, when fully serviceable and fuelled up, needs about 4,000 ft to pull up safely without soiling the underwear.



    [​IMG]



    Getting the aircraft out of Evans Head was the next problem so they called on Jim Treadwell (below), to do the honours. At the time, Jim was the CO of 76 Squadron. He had completed his exercise at Evans Head and was back on the ground at Amberley when he was informed that there was an aircraft down at Evans Head. He arranged for guards to monitor and secure the aircraft, got hold of an Army Pilatus Porter aircraft and flew down to Evans Head with the Senior Air Traffic Control officer from Amberley. Their aim was to access whether it would be possible to fly the Mirage out and save all the trouble of getting the aircraft out by road.



    After arriving at Evans Head they got hold of a heavy vehicle and tore up and down the runway to establish whether the surface would support a Mirage and to sweep it clean of FOD. They also consulted Mirage take-off performance data and, although tight, worked out that we could reduce take-off distance by just taking on enough fuel to get to Willytown.



    [​IMG]

    A Caribou rescue 8 was put on and a bunch of framies arrived from Willytown with some new bits and also jacks and new wheels and before long the aircraft was serviceable again.



    By now the news of the arrival of all those military aircraft, along with a bunch of blokes in various types of uniform, popping into the small Evans Head airport had spread like wild fire and a huge number of people had gathered at the airport to have a look see.



    Late next afternoon, after the framies had done their magic, it was crunch time. There was a quick call to the closest met office to get an actual then it was time to fire up the Mirage and line her up. The local policeman was asked to move all the people from the end of the strip, just in case the calculations proved not to be correct. Afterall, a RAAF Mirage at full chat plowing into a couple of hundred civvies wouldn’t look good on the news.



    Jim taxied to the very end of the runway, turned into what wind there was, held the aircraft on brakes and throttled the engine up to full bore. He then lit the after burner and let the brakes off while also selecting the “over speed” facility (this was an arrangement that in a marginal take-off situation the engine would rev to 110% and produce addition power). This time it didn't engage as the outside air temperature was not high enough.



    Initially the aircraft accelerated normally but then slowed as the wheels started sinking into the runway surface - but it was too late to stop. Jim could see the fence at the far end of the runway looming up and some of his body bits started to tighten. At 145 knots, 15 knots lower than normal take-off speed, he hauled back on the pole, the nose of the aircraft reared up and just then the over-speed clicked in. The fence was hellishly close. The aircraft leapt into the air with the nose at an alarmingly high angle but the additional overspeed thrust had done the trick.



    He missed the fence but scorched the paintwork on a few cars that had foolishly parked at the end of the runway. To get to a safe airspeed, he lowered the nose and some distance down the track got the aircraft up close to 600 knots, turned back and buzzed the airfield at a very very low level.



    45 minutes later he was in circuit at Willytown and shortly thereafter into the Mess for a thirst quencher or two.
    #96
  17. Happy Snapper

    Happy Snapper GOMOB.

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    I have walked into that one back in 1989.

    Good story about how they found it.

    It was on a flight from Redcliffe to Archerfield and never arrived.

    SAR could not find it and then a former RAAF WW2 pilot came forward.

    He told of a training flight in that area and flew between two peaks when he suddenly realised he was flying into a box canyon.

    Just managed to drag his aircraft up and over without incident.

    Showed the spot on a map.. and that is where they found the plane.

    Have some pix of the wreckage somewhere.
    #97
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  18. Brute

    Brute Melbourne , outer east .

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    I remember seeing a plane wreck in Princess Charlotte bay in the late 90's .Most of it was buried in the sand. I must have a dig through my old photos.
    #98
  19. Brute

    Brute Melbourne , outer east .

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    Haven't found the pic from Princess Charlotte bay yet , but I found this pic . These pilots took off and then accidentally selected reverse gear. 20180909_114922.jpg

    Attached Files:

    #99
  20. Brute

    Brute Melbourne , outer east .

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    I don't know how I put that parts listing in and I don't know how to get rid of it.