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Auxiliary lights and fuse blocks

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by wvcajun, Jul 10, 2007.

  1. wvcajun

    wvcajun Captain Innuendo

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    Oct 20, 2004
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    Is it possible to install 2 sets of aux lights to an 06 R12GS without an additional fuse block? If so, how? If not, how? Could someone please piont me to the best books on wiring basics for auto/moto applications. I am a very educated man, just not with wiring. I can pick things up quicky and am fairly mechanicall inclined, I just don't have any experience with that kind of stuff. When you all start talking about amps and alternators, etc - it is all greek to me. I feel fairly certain that I can follow a wiring diagram, but how to physically make the connections is between wires is the hard part. Which connections would be appropriate for the particular situation, etc. I searched the internet and it was very confusing. Thanks in advance.

    WVCajun
    #1
  2. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    Sure, just wire them directly to the battery using the supplied wiring. It makes it a bit crowded at the battery, but it works.

    Jim :brow
    #2
  3. wvcajun

    wvcajun Captain Innuendo

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    I would like to wire them with the regular light circuits. ie - the driving lights on with the high beams and the fogs on with the dims.

    wvcajun
    #3
  4. canuck479

    canuck479 Adventurer

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    You need to use a relay to control your lights. The lights power supply should come straight from the battery. Your relay control power will work best if you use the low beam power. That way the lights wont come on and draw any power until the bike is running. if you need some more details just send me a PM:clap
    #4
  5. Gringo

    Gringo simple by nature

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    Easy to do. Look for a DPDT relay (double-pole-double-throw; SPDT = single-pole-double-throw - you probably already got some of these with your aux lights, but don't throw 'em away just yet...). NAPA carries DPDT's but they usually don't know it and have to hunt a bit in their books to find one - I think my last was a Bosch from a VW A/C circuit. A DPDT has two (+) outputs, or in other words, two 'on' positions, one is 'on' when the relay is actuated by the excitation circuit, and the other is 'on' when relay is not excited. SPDT's are either on or off, like a light switch in your house.

    Run a wire from the excitation pole of the relay to a tap into your high beam (+) wire; then wire your two sets of lights to the two relay (+) outputs - fogs to 'default' or 'off' output, driving lights to 'actuated' or 'excited' ('on') output. Run one ~12ga. supply wire from battery (+) to the relay power input, NOT the excitation input - these two are easily confused. Put an inline fuse holder in this feed wire somewhere near the battery, and select a fuse to match the draw of the bigger of the 2 sets of aux lights - prolly 15A (blue). This way you only have to add 1 wire to your battery spaghetti, it only runs a short distance along the bike's backbone, and power feed splits after the relay. Ground both sets of lights to the frame somewhere near their mounting points, or near the relay and run 2 wires round-trip, to the lights and back to this ground. Don't forget to ground the relay too, off the appropriate pole.

    I've got 2 bikes with an Autoswitch controlling this setup; the autoswitch activates the SPDT relay it came with which is installed upstream from the DPDT and controls power feed into the DPDT power input; the DPDT is wired as descibed above to simply switch the output of this feed. When I turn the key only the headlight comes on, as no power is feeding the power input on the DPDT; hitting the autoswitch makes the SPDT hot and sends power into the DPDT, which then sends it to whichever aux lights are selected by low or high beam position. The switch means I don't have to always have the lights on even though I do always run them - comes from too many years living with an airhead charging system, and there are situations where I do want them off (idling in traffic, or in the woods to avoid rattling ex$pen$ive bulb filament$). The Autoswitch is an elegant solution, but you could save $$ and just use a cheap switch like what comes with aux light kits in its place, if you have a place to hang it, and switch the SPDT relay with that instead. Or on modern bikes with strong charging systems, some folks just wire this straight to the battery and always have the aux lites come on when the key is turned - your choice.

    You could also do it the way I think Canuck is talking about, using 2 SPDT relays you prolly already have - one taps its excitation off the low-beam, one taps off the high. Drawbacks are more complex (but perhaps more logical to you) wiring, more wires/connections to rattle loose, prolly 2 power wires, one to each relay, and depending on your relays there may be a very brief lag when switching from low to hi beam; with a DPDT something's always on so no 'dark blink' when switching, a bit more instantaneous. You could still feed both with a 3rd SPDT and switch turn the whole mess off like I do for those times when you DON'T want aux lights...
    #5
  6. spanker

    spanker Lake City, FL

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    The AUTOSWITCH http://www.autoswitch.com/ is a device that looks for two 12vdc pulses to operate a relay for aux lights, for example. I wired mine to the high beam flasher switch. I flash the high beam twice within 1.2 secs, it sends 12vdc to a heavy-duty, relay-operated aux lighting harness, closes the relay, and turns the lights on. Yes, the lighting relay is hard-wired directly to the battery. This link http://www.tpi4x4.com/KLR650/Electric.htm
    is for a KLR lighting harness, I can't seem to find the one I bought for the Beemer. Regardless, the install precludes the need for an ugly, non-factory switch on your handlebars. I don't see why you couldn't use an AUTOSWITCH to power more than one relay.
    #6
  7. wvcajun

    wvcajun Captain Innuendo

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    Anyone know where I can download a pictorial documentary of a DIY aux light install? Preferably on a R12GS? I have no idea how to find the proper wires to tap into. THEN, I have no idea how to properly tap into them. PLease point me to a resource that can help.

    Couldn't I wire the lights to the high/low beam switch (the factory one that is already there) without an "autoswitch," that way the drive lights would be on with the high beams and the fogs on with the low beams. I know some of you guys are reading this thinking "How can this guy not understand how to do these simple things?" BUT I have never seen these things done and didn't have much in school on electricity. I could wax poetic on the intracacies of the human body, but that's not going to help with bike maintenace.
    #7
  8. Jim Bud

    Jim Bud Long timer

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    Just taping into the wires won't work.....you need to find an experienced friend....or have a dealer do it.....its not rocket science....but you are playing with fire.....
    #8
  9. JDLuke

    JDLuke Ravening for delight

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    The problem with doing that is the capacity of that circuit. It's got small wires and small components for driving a small switch load, not big beefy well-fused feed-the-auxiliary-lights-some-real-wattage heavy gauge wiring. If/when you tap into the switch wires, it's for one purpose and one purpose only: To obtain an on/off signal.

    Now, as for what to do with that signal...

    You could run it directly to the lights. But that's a bad idea for the reasons outlined above.

    You could feed it into a relay. The relay is nothing more than an electrically-controlled switch. The on/off signal will turn the switch on/off, and that switch can handle plenty of power (if you have the right relay) to feed the lights. It's basically two circuits: One that turns the relay on/off, and one directly to battery power through an inline fuse (or a fuse block) that is switched by the relay and feeds the lights. You really *need* to do it at least this well.

    Better yet, take the above idea, and add one more switch between the low beam/high beam circuit you're tapping and the relay. You might as well, light kits COME with these switches. If nothing else, if you ever stuck twenty miles from home with a bad alternator, you *really* don't need to be drawing an extra 70 or 110 watts from your battery.
    #9