Aviation MegaThread!!!!

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by EvilGenius, Jan 1, 2009.

  1. mfp4073

    mfp4073 Long timer

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    Im sorry for your and everyone else effected loss. We are getting ready to do several shows with Memphis Belle in the next few weeks. Im suspecting those lost will be on my mind every time im working with the aircraft for a very long time.
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  2. chazbird

    chazbird Long timer

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  3. Old Blue

    Old Blue Shallow waterman

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    I did 10 years in a cubicle and have done 12 and counting at a refinery. Shitty eyes kept me out of a cockpit. But, if I could, I’d choose the bus ANY DAY.
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  4. Old Blue

    Old Blue Shallow waterman

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    And speaking of buses: We flew from San Juan, Costa Rica, to Houston IAH yesterday. The flight was delayed 2 hours, the weather was crappy, and the crew had to turn around and fly all the way back to Guatemala City. A long, tough day. Yet the pilots took the time to talk to my son and let him check out the cockpit. They spent quite a bit of time with him that they surely didn’t have.

    It made my boy’s (and my) day.

    Hats’ off to you guys who do it for a living. Thanks for doing what you do and keeping us safe.

    Adjustments.JPG
    eddyturn, 1911fan, FishHunt and 16 others like this.
  5. Vinz Klortho

    Vinz Klortho Square Peg Supporter

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    Sunrise this morning at DFW

    Mds.jpg
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  6. mfp4073

    mfp4073 Long timer

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    This is what happens when a P-40 and a P-51 get into it

    Athe Mustang was on takeoff roll when it struck the stationary P-40 and took a bite out of the wingtip.


    [​IMG]
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  7. airheadPete

    airheadPete Wherever they send me. Supporter

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    Thank you!
    We actually enjoy doing that. It’s nice to interact with the kids who think that this stuff is all so cool. It’s a tonic for us, as one tends to get a bit jaded, since at the end of the day, it is a job. The enthusiasm is neat to see.
    Good to see the FO flipped the light test switch to ON, so the cockpit looks like a Christmas tree. :D
    I’ve done this a couple of times in the last week. Funnily enough, they were both little girls! We could use more of those. One of them had lots of questions. One of them was “How do you talk to us?” So I grabbed the PA handset and put it in front of her mouth and told her what to say: “Good morning everybody!”
    The cabin got a kick out of that, as did she and her mom.
    Just a hint, if you want to do this, try to visit at the start of the flight. We should have time unless something is going sideways. (At the end of the flight, we’re in a hurry to get out and go home or find the next airplane.)

    I’ve never worked with a guy who wasn’t eager to show off our office.
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  8. UncaBuddha

    UncaBuddha Well, Okay then.

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  9. jdgretz

    jdgretz Looking for new places Supporter

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    Going back a bunch of years, say early 1970s, the "requirements " for joining the airlines was CMEL, Instruments and something like 1000 hours total. But in reality, no one was hired off the streets unless they also had a 4-year degree and a couple of thousand hours of multi-engine jet time that was not acquired in the military. Oh, and you had to be under 30. So, I got my degree in Aviation Management, had a couple of thousand hours of turbine time (military), CFI, CSEL, CMEL, Commercial Rotorcraft, Instruments, including rotorcraft, ground instructor stuff and a few more thousand hours in multis doing charters, flying mail, etc., and got my Military Test Pilot and Maintenance Officer qualifications added to the CV.

    I applied to all the majors and many of the smaller lines just about the time Braniff laid off a bunch of pilots - well, there went that market. Hard to compete with folks that have a bunch of hours and are already type rated in the aircraft you are hoping to learn to fly.

    Got more time, more air frames and waited until the next round of hiring. Late 1970s, to early 1980s there were a number of mergers and shutdowns that dumped more qualified pilots back into the market place. Then I turned 30. *sigh*

    So I did other things for a paycheck and continued to fly charters, instructed, some fire suppression work, and part timed with some of the local TV stations to give their main pilots some relief.

    Never made it to the majors or the cargo folks. I accumulated over 5000 hours of time before I really quit counting. I still fly with friends and sometimes manage to get time in some fun corporate stuff.

    Do I wish I could have done that for a living? - oh hell yes! Do I often think I should have gone back on active duty with the army, swapped my commission for a warrant and flown for 30+ years? That's another hell yes! (one of my friends retired with over 40 years in military aviation. He was the last Vietnam UH-1 IP on active duty when he retired)

    If you have a chance to fly, and it's what you love to do, and are willing to put up with whatever it takes to get that position, then go for it. Flying is like motorcycles - it gets in your blood. The only cure it to fly at some level.

    [/rambling]

    jdg
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  10. oldmanb777

    oldmanb777 Just say NO to socialism!

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    ^^^^ well said. It's an impossible bumpy road to a consistent, livable pay check, and many don't make it. Timing AND luck all play a major role.
  11. UncaBuddha

    UncaBuddha Well, Okay then.

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    I've been pretty lucky actually. AF pilot, when I put my papers in everyone was hiring and by March 92 when I got out only one major was hiring and the rest were on the cusp of furloughs. I sort of rattled around for 6 months and backed into a job flying Navajos in the Ditch. What an education! Biggest thing it taught me was the value of a UNION! Decided I would try to go to SW so I paid for a type and the day I passed the type check I got the letter from UPS asking me to interview and got hired. That was 25 years ago and, although the flying has sometimes been pretty tiring, the paychecks have never bounced.
    I guess if I could have made a living in the music industry I would trade but that's a pretty fickle mistress.
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  12. Heyload

    Heyload Bent but not broken Supporter

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    We'd do this on the C-5 sometimes during cruise during the pre 9-11 days. That put an end to that. But it was always fun to bring a kid up and let them sit in the jump seat between the pilots. I'd get them settled in and buckled, plop a headset on them, and let the pilots entertain them for 10 or 15 minutes.

    Those kids would ask some pretty good questions. My favorite was the one probably nine or ten year old kid that asked what our approach speed was on final.

    Then I'd escort them back to their parents. I made it a point to tell them, right in front of their parents; "You know all those grownups that tell you nobody is going to pay you to just sit and look out a window all day? They're wrong."
    Uke, Shaggie, fullmonte and 4 others like this.
  13. Zoef zoef

    Zoef zoef Long timer

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    I`m a bit puzzled by this one, how can the prop of the P-40 be intact?
  14. Uniturner

    Uniturner Adventurer

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    Has PM finished its race career? I know it had the fire, just curious about the intentions with the airframe?
  15. mfp4073

    mfp4073 Long timer

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    moving at the speed of money. the airframe is in cali. Honestly...and I dont know this for a fact, the unlimited class may be at the end of their career at reno. Right now its just stock warbirds making victory laps for the grandstands. The cost of operating an unlimited makes zero sense. Its MANY times the reward purse just to field a real race plane...which is very very sad to say the least.
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  16. chazbird

    chazbird Long timer

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    The "forces" behind that are kind of interesting and follow the evolved demand characteristics of other domains. Got a '57 sunburst Les Paul guitar? Its pretty much going to be rarely played - it'll be trotted out every once in awhile, admired, a few notes played and put back into its insured climate controlled storage. It seems to me surplus war-birds which can be (or were) modified, raced, blown-up, even crashed, are becoming a rarity no different from the Les Paul example. The only difference of the war-bird is its temporal distance from the present time back to WWII - but both represent long gone era's.

    50 years ago one could get a P51 (or '57 Les Paul ) for real cheap and you could do what you want with it. They weren't cheap so much because of their lack of rarity but because their historical significance was, at the time, rather ephemeral. There were about the same P51's and '57 Les Paul's now as there were 50 years ago, but the almost invisible forces of history, particularly symbolism, the kind deemed important to a cultures identity, is pushing towards artifacts retaining their symbolic purity. For better or worse I don't think any race purse is likely to overcome these forces. I guess we should be pleased that some of us (not me, really) were able to experience and appreciate the ingenuity of those which took the top technology of a particular era and modified it to unimagined levels before the artifacts were marched back to their original state.

    :photogpompous one ale post!
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  17. staticPort

    staticPort Meditrider Supporter

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    I'm one of those who never made the airlines and 'settled' for corporate, with mixed results. Got stuck in an office several times along the way. Landed a decent seat for the last 23 years though. And loved looking out that wonderful window every damn day till the chocks were set.

    There's nothing like it . . .
  18. oldmanb777

    oldmanb777 Just say NO to socialism!

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    ^^^ yep nothing like it. Pretty small group of humans that have seen what I took for granted. But what I remember most is living in a state of constant chronic fatigue in between expected furlough notices, or bankruptcies and pay and benefit cuts. Still, I probably wouldn't have traded for any other "salt mine".
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  19. UncaBuddha

    UncaBuddha Well, Okay then.

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    @oldmanb777
    Funny you mention the view as well. I'm always really disappointed when there is an undercast west of the 100th Meridian! Love looking down there and thinking of retiring and going exploring. I don't know of any other job that consistently gives you the views that pilots get!
    Sure that 8pm to 6am 4-legger is a ball buster. But the SDF-OAK daytime ride makes up for it!

    Hope you are enjoying retirement!
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  20. chazbird

    chazbird Long timer

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    The high's and the low's, among many, have already been succinctly described earlier in this thread but these two (low's) stick with me;

    @oldmanb777 's hotel room's sleep deprivation torture device - the adjacent ice machine. Sounds trivial but it summarizes the grind of life on the road.

    @No False Enthusiasm 's summertime high density altitude mountain takeoff in a Cherokee Warrior from Ruidoso, NM. Staggering into the air, wallowing along not climbing, and lucking out that the terrain ahead descended - then spending long hours alone over desolate east New Mexico and West Texas to contemplate that.

    Sounds like schadenfreude but if we're honest, all pilots (well, most) know very well that in one way or another we've been there.
    No False Enthusiasm likes this.