B.C. Collector Plate

Discussion in 'Canada' started by jackd, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. jackd

    jackd Been here awhile

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  2. Mach Z

    Mach Z Budding ADV Addict!

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    JackD
    I think the key is not to ask too many questions! (at the agent level I mean)
    Fill out this form http://www.icbc.com/vehicle-registration/Specialty-vehicles/collector-status.pdf , after reading this http://www.icbc.com/vehicle-registration/Specialty-vehicles/collector-status.pdf , provide your pictures. You can even state on your application that the Corbin seat is a period correct modification. I supplied pics with a Corbin seat with my application. Just drop off all the stuff with your usual agent (unless that's the person who thinks it doesn't qualify) and they courier it to ICBC. Within a couple of weeks you will get a call that your plates are in. It's just that easy!

    On my H2B application I listed all my modifications but made a point of indicating that they were "period correct".
    Expansion chambers, clubman bars, dual disc with reversed calipers, cafe mirror, etc.:deal

    Hope this helps!
    #2
  3. navi

    navi Been here awhile

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    I would not get to over worked about the paperwork. They ( icbc ) seem to have a handle on some stuff, or at least the bike collector plate.

    I had a 82 Kz1000J that was over the top not stock... but all the aftermarket stuff was " era specific " and no problems.

    I sent in the Photo's, wrote a nice note.. Done deal

    I wouldn't bother with talking too much to the person at the insurance ( business that collects the money ) place... they seem to be off the edge sometimes.

    Thats my 2
    #3
  4. sdbruns

    sdbruns Potemkin villager

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    I ran 2 bikes through the process in 2005. Neither bike (Guzzi Eldo and a Ducati 860) are near concours (bar end mirrors 'cause the stock ones made you dizzy using them and different turn signals since the stockers were unobtanium) but I had no problems. I actually think that they just look at the required 4 photos you provide and google the model and compare.

    It's worth a try - the insurance savings are considerable.
    #4
  5. DNF

    DNF Been here awhile

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    My friend has an old GS with collector plates. It is totally stock and he thought that is the way it had to be. Ran into a guy on the ferry with an old Kawi (whatever) with stupid aftermarket pipes, missing bits, whatever. He told me it was just the age of the bike. Cars however are another issue.

    But that is from some guy on the ferry.
    #5
  6. panorton

    panorton Charming as F**k

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    if they both filed a claim, who do you think would be denied?
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  7. Steve G.

    Steve G. Long timer

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    Hi Jack,
    I wouldn't place much credibility on that 'underwriter' you talked to.
    The only thing you require from the manufacturer in the form of a letter is the production numbers. Of course you know that this is only needed if you want to get a collector plate early [15-24 yrs old]. No physical description is needed from the manufacturer.
    There has indeed been some relaxation on certain 'period' accessories which can be on the bike. Corbin started making seats for the Paralever GS in the early 1990's, so clearly this is acceptable. The real big one these days has been the guys trying to get original exhaust for early 80's Japanese bikes, in particular the CBX [I've done really well there], 4 pipe Hondas, KZ series Kawasakis, and big GS Suzukis. Former ICBC Collector Plate boss Nigel Mathews came to a meeting of the British bike club before he retired stating that aftermarket 4 into 1 exhaust were indeed ok, but must be very clean condition. In fact, the cleanliness of the bike/car is very important.
    I put a 400-4 Supersport Honda through recently, no issues, of course it was cosmetically perfect and original, so this would not have tested the 15-24 yr scenerio. I cannot honestly say with confidence whether they would fail your bike without the decal kit. I put my Laverda Jota through successfully in the mid 90's without it's pinstriping. I know that since Nigel Mathews has retired, there is more emphasis on using internet pictures to confirm cosmetic accuracy, back in the mid 90's, this was not the case. It was only 5 yrs ago I did the striping, and sent followup pictures, including pics of original Jota mufflers I found new, for which they thanked me. I recently decided to run my Jota without it's factory optional Futura fairing, I sent pics of the bike in both configurations, telling them my intentions to swap from one to the other at my whim, no problems.
    I've been running period Norvil rearsets on my '74 Norton since the mid 90's, sent pics of the modification, no issues.
    My brother's '72 Combat Norton [of which I am now the caretaker] had some issues with ICBC re: the color of the paint, they argued the blue did not have big enough metal flake,,,,,not sure what transpired but he was able to get a plate no problem, and when I took ownership and re-applied, not a word about it.
    My RC30 required certain paperwork confirming production numbers [ I applied with the machine being 18 yrs old] , which Honda race division HRC [RC30/RC45 production facility] was not able [or willing] to offer. It took a letter to then Cycle World chief editor David Edwards asking if he could help. He sent a 1990 Cycle World article on the complete RC30 story, including production numbers,,,,,,which ICBC happily accepted.

    I've currently got a multi-vehicle collector plate, for the truly self indulgent self-spoiled among us. This allows me to decide in the morning which bike I want to ride, even swap the plate multiple times in a day, without going to the local agent. When my current restoration of this CT70 is completed, I will be getting it 'plated' and tranfered to the multi-plate, no extra cost in insurance.

    Steve
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  8. edwin

    edwin Been here awhile

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    what is the minimun age of a bike for collector status in BC now? it used to be 25 yrs....so that would mean a '87 model or older....you have a '90's bmw? it would be very cool to lower the age limit that is forsures.
    all the best!
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  9. Steve G.

    Steve G. Long timer

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    Normally it's 25 yrs,,, but 15 yrs under special circumstance, primarily limited roduction status, 1500 units per model per yr.
    Vintage plates are 30 yrs, a much less expensive plate to run, but also very limited use,,,,,designated club/event rides only, and less emphasis on cosmetic perfection.
    Steve
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  10. Steve G.

    Steve G. Long timer

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    So you've contacted that place and they've lost the file?
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  11. swellguy

    swellguy Been here awhile

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    One of the things to remember with Collector plates is that even though you get cheaper insurance, that really only counts on the ICBC portion. Any private insurance you might add like comprehensive, collision, might not be covered because fo the bike's age (Megson Fitzpatrick seems to be the best here) and there's no telling if that kind of insurance is much cheaper with ICBC.
    The other things is that you have to have at least one vehicle fully insured. When one of my bikes was CP''d (bone stock '73 Honda cb750) it wasn't an issue. One agent told me that the fully insured vehicle had to be a motorcycle, another said it could be a regular car or truck.
    I have one bike that ICBC refuses to give me collector plates for, a 1954 Harley Panhead. It's stock plus a number of additions that can be considered either natural additions through the life a 57 year old motorcycle or safety items that make it safer to ride today.
    Once it was refused solely because the gas tank had been painted with scallops. I argued that many of these bikes had been modified into "bobbers" and this was a period correct customization that made the bike part of a known class of historic motorcycles. They bought it.
    Then they declined the plate because I had changed the front brake from a drum to a disc brake. I argued that this was an inevitable evolution for safety purposes and they agreed on this point.
    Then they turned me down because the bike has newer Dunlop (Harley factory) tires. Again, I argued safety matters and they agreed.
    They turned me down because the bike had yellow grips (which match the scallops, kicker pedal, plug wires and a number of other bits as part of the bobber look). I reminded them of the bobber decision they made and backed down.
    Now they have declined my application because the motor is dual plugged.
    I just do this now every six months or so thinking someone else might go for it.
    #11
  12. DNF

    DNF Been here awhile

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    that is crazy.

    I freaking hate ICBC, I miss AB insurance.... sniff.
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  13. DNF

    DNF Been here awhile

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    guy on ferry has collector plates on a very non-stock kawi bike. Maybe he changed it later but he didn't seem like the lying type.
    #13
  14. 250senuf

    250senuf Long timer

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  15. Steve G.

    Steve G. Long timer

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    One could quite easily determine and decide that you are not using the the collector plate division option in the 'true spirit' of what it was meant to do, namely keeping old stock machines running.
    Nothing personal, but I don't buy the "bobber" and custom paint thing. If you get a plate good on ya, but it just means you've taken a short cut to cheap insurance instead of going the often harder route of making the machine a true representation of how it was when it left the factory.

    Steve
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  16. DaveBall

    DaveBall Long timer

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    It is odd how we can all get different info from ICBC about collector plates. I have one on my 81 BMW R100RT. When I originally applied for the plate, I had to change out the non-stock corbin seat and put on a stock one. Everything else was fine, except they said I had to get the R100RT decal installed on the side covers, until I was able to proove that the decals were not installed on all bikes from the factory.

    I later asked about replacing the original rubber brake hoses with braided stainless. They said that as the original rubber hoses are still available, it could only have the rubber. I tried to argue about safety and better braking ability with the stainless lines, they said it does not matter. Put on the stainless and the insurance in invalid.

    As the paint is original from 1981 (Smoked Red) and it is now starting to look rather tatty, faded, chips, etc. I called up ICBC head office to enquire if I could change the colour. There answer was that I could only paint it a stock colour that was offfered on the RT from 1979 to 1983, 2 years either side of the year of the bike. Well that sucks big time as to replicate the original paint will cost me more than to go and buy another bike from the USA and import it. So, it will keep it's battle scars and slowly look worse for wear.

    Then I talk to friends with heavily modified bikes and cars, and they have no issues whatsoever getting ICBC to cover them. One even has gotten a plate on a chopped Honda 750/4 that he sent the pictures in with a full raked front end, peanut tank, huge sissy bar, etc. Not a comment from ICBC except to go pick up his collector plate.
    #16
  17. sdbruns

    sdbruns Potemkin villager

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    It's discriminatory on ICBC's part since they make generous allowances for hot rod type cars vis a vis Collector plate, why not motorcycles?

    http://icbc.com/registration-licensing/specialty-vehicles/modified-collector


    Anyone who lives in BC needs a "shortcut to cheap insurance". ICBC is simply another method of revenue generation for the provincial government. Lower taxes for corporations and the rich and jack up the "fees" for the rest of us. Remember parking meters in the Provincial Parks?
    #17
  18. swellguy

    swellguy Been here awhile

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    No offence taken, believe me. I fully admit this is not a factory stock bike nor have I tried in any way to make it that. I've had it for ten years and much of the look of the bike was more or less done during the actual periods. The changes I have made were, if anything, to repair, replace or improve some of the period specific modifications the bike has undergone over time.

    I'd also like to make it clear that I have the utmost of respect for all those individuals who seek to return and restore their classic motorcycle to its original factory condition. That said, I'd venture to say that the overwhelming number of people who apply for collector plates in BC do so for the cheap insurance, not for a the love and reward of a Concours restoration,

    Plain and simple, it's a way to save money . . . lots of it in some cases.
    #18
  19. trex300

    trex300 Been here awhile

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    I was informed by my insurance agent that since there was no check box for "pleasure use only" and "to/from work" for motorcycles that I could get a collector plate and still commute to work.

    Is there any truth to this?

    Also what are the chances of getting the 1990 fighting red color on my 1987 Honda Transalp through? The '87 came with the white paint and red/blue stripes, where the '90 came with red paint and silver stripes.

    I'm contemplating trying to get it through ICBC just to see if it'll go.

    Thanks in advance for any and all insight into this matter,
    Rick in Chilliwack
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  20. sdbruns

    sdbruns Potemkin villager

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    Can't ride to work - that is why I hesitated getting CP's for a long time.

    From the ICBC website: http://www.icbc.com/registration-licensing/specialty-vehicles/collector-vehicles


    Driving restrictions
    Pleasure use: Vehicles with collector plates are restricted to pleasure use only. With collector vehicles, you may never drive to work or school.
    Important: Driving a vehicle with collector plates for reasons other than pleasure use could void your insurance.
    Driving after dark: If your vehicle doesn't have the lights and reflectors required by the Motor Vehicle Act Regulations, you may not drive it between half an hour after sunset and half an hour before sunrise.
    #20