Bakery Quest - a year hacking the US with our kid and dogs.

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by szurszewski, Oct 16, 2016.

  1. rubline

    rubline Coddiwomple

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    Thanks Josh!
  2. norton73

    norton73 drinkin' in the garage Supporter

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    Best book on flying ever;

    [​IMG]


    Gann starts as a barnstormer in the 30s and goes on to fly airliners to the early 60s. Almost takes out the Taj Mahal and has a few other adventures on the way. Yes, it's a true story written by a great writer.
    Dedicated to the 495 fellow pilots who didn't make it.
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  3. mracer

    mracer Adventurer

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    Just finished the whole trip, in aprox 3 hours... I am normally pretty busy around the weekend but it's raining all day and the pork shoulder is in the oven cooking while kids are visiting friends so i felt like diving into your adventure. And so after binging through the trip notes i need to clarify - Did you guys end up getting bakery going? And if so - where? Other than that - amazing trip, awesome story and hats off for getting the kid into this adventure - he will forever remember it and use it as a guiding light in his life and with his own kids.
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  4. szurszewski

    szurszewski Long timer

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    @mracer
    No bakery yet. Laura was doing the baking for an old friend’s restaurant up until mid March 2020, and has taken on a few small/commissions projects since.

    Jeremiah has (had!) really been enjoying the “normal” school/kid/life thing, and hanging out with his new and probably only first cousin, and so we did something crazy and bought a place to live. Once we figure out how to continue paying that mortgage we will likely foment some bakery ideas we’ve been quietly germinating.
  5. johnnywheels

    johnnywheels Been here awhile Supporter

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    I think the pandemic has brought about monumental changes in education. It’s made parents realize that in-person teacher-led education is not all it’s cracked up to be. Virtual learning empowers parents to make the best choices for their children and, if they so choose, place experiences at a higher priority than formal classroom learning. That single empowerment is incredibly threatening to the established education industry.
  6. Bruincounselor

    Bruincounselor North Plains Drifter Supporter

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    Interesting observation. There's an equal number of parents who figured out that teaching isn't easy and that kids need structure to be successful. I run a summer program and we offer high school courses via on-campus or synchronous virtual options. Registrations are fairly evenly split. The unions may be threatened by any change to status quo; but many teachers are embracing the opportunities this has created.
  7. szurszewski

    szurszewski Long timer

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    These are both great posts. Though I'm not nearly as involved in the education sphere as I was from '97-'16, I do think it's early to say how much change the pandemic will actually inspire - obviously the '20-'21 year itself was hugely and abruptly different, and hopefully we've learned a lot from it, but I don't think we'll see those results for a bit.

    As a primarily in-person educator, take this clearly coming from that bias, but I think in-person education is everything it's cracked up to be and more. Certainly not everyone learns best that way, and in-person education being great hinges monumentally on the quality of the educator, but in my personal experience, which includes designing and implementing contemporary and advanced versions of successful curricula for hybrid and fully online learning, and then observing the results...well, the in-person stuff works better for most learners.

    However, and hopefully this will be a lesson we learn from this experimental year, the best educational system is one that has the flexibility to offer options, and ideally lots of options, for its learners. Most of my "regular" teaching was done with at-risk students (my first paid teaching job was at a tiny alternative high school and it got more complicated after that) and even working with "regular" students it was easy to see that the traditional school model in the US, and most of the "western" world, is not the best or even a good fit for a lot of students. Some of those may find better success at online and self-paced instruction. Some need other things. Experiential education is fantastic, and I hope more parents do feel empowered - and compelled - to provide that for their children. Of course, that is way more expensive than our current model, but the results, I think, likely prove it a worthwhile investment.

    Our school district - the one Jeremiah attends, I mean - created a separate k-12 virtual academy and we opted into it for this closing school year. Not because we thought it would be better, but because we thought it would at least provide a consistent year vs the possibility of starting/stopping in-person classes as case numbers went up/down through the year. Those of you who know Jeremiah will not be surprised to hear that he did well, got great grades, was almost constantly as far ahead in all his classes as he was able/allowed to be, and even learned some stuff. But he is motivated to learn, can self-focus, has parents who value education and who had the time to make sure he was on task (hardly ever, if ever, necessary this year) and help him/find help for him whenever he ran into something he didn't get. That was not the case for a lot of kids - and I'd guess it was not the case in fact for most kids - who spent the year learning "virtually."

    So, while I don't know that I'd agree that virtual learning itself empowers parents to make the best decisions for their children's education, I do hope that the option for virtual learning - and hopefully many more options - will become more available and that parents will feel inspired empowered to learn about how their very individual children learn and then pick the best options for them.

    Jeremiah will, unless a team of horses decides otherwise and is able to catch him, be gleefully attending in-person classes in the fall and spending - I assume - as little time with his parents as he can ;)
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  8. Nixels

    Nixels Face fears - live life

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    How are you going to parlay that little talk into a stay-at-home income stream? :D








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