BaseCamp Tutorial

Discussion in 'Mapping & Navigation' started by smbjm, Apr 1, 2015.

  1. Podman

    Podman Rocketman Supporter

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    Are they asleep over at st-owners.com - I have tried multiple times to get them to send me a confirmation email - no response
  2. Bernie Echt

    Bernie Echt Adventurer

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    I may be a little late to the party, but I found a British youtube video, where the guy is creating a route from his tracks. And it stays stable when converted to the GPS units.
    He first makes a route using his profile (motorcycle) in BaseCamp. When he has the route the way he wants, he selects the drop down menu and creates a Track from his route in BaseCamp. Then he changes his Route Profile to the "Arrow" (Direct) activity icon. Now he selects the Track and creates a route from this Track. This route has a huge number of Shaping Points (silent). In your Preferences for BaseCamp (Mac) you can preset the maximum number of points when converting a Track to a Route. This is also available in BaseCamp for Windows.
    After you have created this route in the "Arrow" (Direct) Activity, you can change the Activity back to "Motorcycle" or "Car" and it will recalculate and become a route with directions. Your next step is do remove excessive Shaping Points. Also at this time you can add in any Waypoints you want the route to announce to you, like gas stations, restaurants, camp sounds, etc.
    Keep in mind, most of the newer Zumo/Navigator units can only handle 125 Shaping Points, between each WayPoint and I think only 25 Waypoints per route, before the GPS unit will split the route into 2.
    Here is a link to the Mac Video:
    Check his site, he also has videos for Windows BaseCamp.
  3. bross

    bross Where we riding to? Supporter

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    Maybe I'm missing something, but if you created the route in Basecamp initially, what's the point of making the track only to convert that back into a route???
  4. lkraus

    lkraus Long timer

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    The YouTube description says, "This video describes how to create a route from a track using Garmin BaseCamp Mac edition." If you have downloaded a gpx file, it will most likely be a track since that is the most generic format that will work with most devices. The author has other videos for creating a route from scratch.

    But there may still be value in going through the route>track>route conversion process for a route you have created yourself.

    One way you might quickly create a route from scratch is to let Basecamp determine an initial route between your start and end points, and just drag the result here and there a couple times to use the roads you want. This is fine until you get on the road and something causes a recalculation. If you only have a couple intermediate shaping points, the recalculated route can be very different from the original. The route>track>route conversion will automatically create a lot of shaping points, pinning down the route so that a recalculation cannot change it very much. So this could be a real time saver compared to adding a bunch of shaping points manually.

    I initially had trouble understanding why it was necessary to change the activity profile from Motorcycling (or Driving, or whatever) to Direct. Experimenting, I found that Direct is the only profile that adds via points between the start and end points. In any other mode, the created route has Start and End points, and no shaping points. In Windows, Basecamp asks about the number of points to add each time you create a route from a track in the Direct profile - it's not a preference setting as shown in the video using the Mac version, but it does seem to remember the number used previously.
    Bernie Echt likes this.
  5. Bernie Echt

    Bernie Echt Adventurer

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    The benefits for Tracks is a way to verify that you are on intended route, by displaying it on the map window of the GPS at the same time the route is displayed. The other benefit is that Tracks don't change. Tracks are a list of GPS Coordinates and they are the same in any navigating app or software. But Tracks don't provide routing instructions. That is one reason of off-road events provide Tracks for their Rallies. They also come in handy if you are sharing routes by email.
    The only reason I suggested to create a route from the Track is to give you a way to add Waypoints as stops to a Track someone had send you. Of course if you know how to edit a Track, you can add a Waypoint (GPS Coordinates) to it. But Tracks do not announce anything.
    Also remember that most newer GPS units will give you the option to display Tracks in different colors.
  6. lkraus

    lkraus Long timer

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    I really like the idea of using Direct mode to make a lot of shaping points automatically. When creating a route from a track previously, the first way I tried was to create via points, then add them to the route, but that was slow and keeping them in the right order was tedious. It was faster to use the hand tool to drag the route a little off the road and put it right back, but that is also slow and prone to placement errors. Letting Basecamp place lots of shaping points in Direct mode seems to be fast and accurate.
  7. Bernie Echt

    Bernie Echt Adventurer

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    Good evening Larry, when I make a route, I use the hand tool and just drag the route to the different roads I want to include. I do not worry if it is making Via-points or Shaping Points. After I get the route the way I want it, I open the properties window, highlight all of the points, I want silent and select the command to make them all silent (Shaping Points).
    This has work very well for me, as long as I don’t forget to silence them before loading the route or sharing it.
    If I decide later to add a stop into the route, I will just copy and paste the Waypoint into the route., at the proper place.
    The reason I have for using the conversion of a Route to a Track, is to have solid guidance of the original route, that the GPS can not modify. So when I ride a route that I made in BaseCamp in an unfamiliar area, I have assurance that the route is what I or whoever gave me the route is leading me the way it was planned.
    The advantage of being able to convert a Track into a Route is just another tool in the tool box.
    Sometimes I just search my old tracks from 10+ years ago and find areas I hadn’t visited for a few years. So it is easy to create a route, using those tracks. Or some folks rather share Tracks then Routes, because they use different route planning software.
    Also a lot of Phone routing apps can not handle GPX routes, but they can handle GPX Tracks.
    Emgo likes this.
  8. Menhir

    Menhir Been here awhile

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    Now that I'm (mostly) retired, I'm giving Basecamp another look. The motivating factor for me is the ability to plan my route in Google Maps first, as I found planning a route in Basecamp somewhat arcane in comparison.

    Here is what I need to know:

    1) I'd like to completely clean out my Basecamp, getting rid of all the sad detritus of my previous failed attempts...tracks, routes, points, etc. A clean slate, if you will. I tried some instructions from the web, but I always seem to have something left over. How can this be done?

    2) I'm running version 4.4.6 I recall upgrading quite some time ago but the newer version required Windows Media Player,* which I had long ago deleted. I rolled back to the version I'm using now. Will that still suffice? (PS: My maps are all current)

    3) Finally, can someone point me to an easy-to-understand tutorial on how the database filing system works. I'll happily admit to not understanding it well, nor what advantages it has over the good old file system other programs use.

    *All my computers run Linux these days. I have one computer with Windows 7, set aside specifically for the few remaining programs I need that will only run on Windows...Garmin stuff being one of them.
  9. Madman4049

    Madman4049 Been here awhile

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    Absolutely
    1. Should be as easy as deleting all files from where your points are saved

    2. Can't answer that but latest version works fine for me

    3. Here's two https://www.newenglandriders.org/learn-basecamp/ very detailed and if you go on youtube sorry can't get link from work computer but cruisermans garage he's a goldwing video guy he has a whole series on basecamp that's so easy I was able to follow it.

    Don't know anything about Linux.

    Basecamp is really easy once you get the gist and realize that they "Garmin" overcomplicate simple processes, it's great for a route with pre-determined stop points for gas, food for rides like Iron Butts. New England riders approach it from more of a device settings and off-road optimization perspective and Cruiserman goldwing does a well more road biased both intertwine well. If you read the articles and watch his cruisermans vids while you practice on a separate monitor as they go it will be a very productive afternoon.

    In a nutshell think of Basecamp as a Win97 flight sim or program with a 600page manual vs Windows 10 so easy a caveman could do it streamlined and it'll make sense. If you just want to go to a state park, town, etc and don't care how you get there it's horrible, if you want to fine tune the crap out of where and how you travel, plan in layovers, stop times, log contact details for each waypoint, and have a few cups of coffee/bourbon/hours to kill it's great.

    Hope that helped.
  10. terryckdbf

    terryckdbf Bumbling BackRoad Riders™

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    @Menhir

    Rather than deleting or trying to delete data in the existing (default) database, Basecamp allows multiple databases to be created, you can create a new database, name it whatever you like, and you will have a clean slate to work with. At any time you can switch to the default (or any other) database if there is something you want to bring into the new database from the old one. Just a thought.

    Terry
  11. Menhir

    Menhir Been here awhile

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    Thanks.
    It looks then, like there is no one-step way to delete everything so I went through everything piece by piece and I think that's all done. Step 1 achieved. :clap
    I'm just going to assume for now that the version I have on my computer will work acceptably well, so Step 2 is possibly achieved, too. :super

    As for the rest, My goal now is to use Basecamp only as the middleman between my device and Google Maps, or any other program that creates and saves routes simply and more efficiently.
    I actually enjoy planning the routes on Google Maps. Not so much on Basecamp.
    For the record, I already have devoted endless hours in the past learning and working with Basecamp (and I have the New England Riders tutorial, too) and I will never go down that road again. Ever. It's water under the bridge.
    Basecamp is not easy and yes, I agree that it is overcomplicated. This is made worse for me because I don't create routes very often so the relearning process on Basecamp each time I get back to it is too burdensome and time-consuming.
    I spend more time on the web and tutorials finding out how to do things again than I do getting things done. :doh

    Now that I have all that old info deleted, I'm hoping to get a fresh start. :-)