Beach bumming Mozambique

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Xpat, Mar 26, 2019.

  1. Xpat

    Xpat Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    799
    Location:
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    Intro

    Few years back I tried to ride on the little tracks I plotted on sat images along the Moz coast from Marracuene just north of Maputo all the way to Vilankulos. I have managed way less than half of the planned tracks and had to chicken out the rest on EN1 tar as I was just not good enough to drag heavy ass rally kitted KTM 690 through all that sand in the available time. That failure has been recorded for posterity here: https://advrider.com/f/threads/christmas-safari-3-mozambique-zimbabwe.1128396/

    So I had a score to settle. Being few years wiser I upgraded to KTM 500 to avoid big bike fatigue that defeated me last time. The plan was simple - start home in Midrand - Johannesburg, make it to the coast at Macaneta in Mozambique through Swaziland to avoid Komatjipoort, and then hit the tracks I have plotted along the coast all the way to Vilankulos. For return leg Runner gave me a pipeline track that shortcutted inland almost straight from Vilankulos to Komatjipoort and then back to Midrand via whatever dirt roads there are. Like so:


    [​IMG]


    I pinged two mates, whom I used for company on my last trip through Kaokoland, but they both used elaborate and improbable excuses to stay out - I'm pretty sure they wussed out because they were just scared of the sand and myself. So solo it was.

    With that sorted, I packed up and set-off on November 5th.
    #1
  2. Xpat

    Xpat Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    799
    Location:
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    Day 1 - Midrand to Maguga dam (Swaziland)

    Day 1 was just a long liaison, something to get done and over with as quickly as possible. To ease the pain of the long commute I plotted what I thought will be shortest route on as much dirt as possible.


    [​IMG]


    To my dismay that route turned out to be about 80% tar as most of the little roads I expected to be dirt have been tarred or cemented to handle the heavy mining trucks traffic. I hit the dirt properly only few dozen km before Swaziland and followed it to the Bulembu border post.

    I have managed to score my first flat within first 50 km near Bapsfontein when I stopped off tar for a piss. That must be my record as it was so far all tar, except that little dirt on the side of the road. I could not find more scenic spot - to be fair, at least there was garage on the other side of the road so I didn't have to pump the tyre up once fixed:


    [​IMG]


    I run Tubeliss, so the flat was quickly sorted with one plug. The only problem was that I didn't have that rough piercy thingy that is used to make the hole bigger before inserting the plug - luckily there was tyre repair shop behind the garage and I could borrow one there. The plug was leaking a bit, but nothing that pumping the wheel up a bit in the morning wouldn't fix.


    [​IMG]


    From then on it was just sheer boredom through the SA mining heartlands until the mountains at the Swazi border popped up ahead and I fiinally hit proper dirt. The track along the border to Bulembu is very scenic and enjoyable.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    A crossing where the dirt track I rode hit the tar road between Barberton and Bulembu. This is not an art - something went wrong with the colors in this picture when I exported it.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    The border crossing was a pleasant non-event and I hit the dirt road down to Piggs Peak and from there tar down to Maguga dam for an overnighter at Maguga lodge.

    The road to Pigg's Peak runs through the big forestry area and I was surprised at the method they use there to harvest the trees - they basically flatened huge areas of forrest giving the whole place an eerie post-apocalyptic look. I know nothing about forestry, but where I'm from in Europe they usually cut certain usually long and narrow stripes, that are intersped with lines of standing trees, so they never cut the big huge area. No idea what is better, but our way at least looks better.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    I arrived at Maguga lodge in the late afternoon, settled into a chalet and after early dinner retreated to bed early:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    #2
    River Rat, kiwial, Brick Top and 8 others like this.
  3. Xpat

    Xpat Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    799
    Location:
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    Day 2 - Maguga dam (Swaziland) to Macaneta (Mozambique)

    The route for day 2 had three distinct parts. First to follow in reverse a track I haven't finished few years back on one of the JustBlipIt's Swazi hardcore weekends due to flat tyre. The track ended in the middle of Swaziland and from there I would take whatever dirt / tar would take me fastest to and through the border in Namaacha. From the border I plotted dirt tracks to Macaneta, circumnavigating Maputo from the north via Moamba - I have been to Maputo twice before and I knew better than to get stuck in it again. It was a long day and I hence I started early at around 6:00 am.


    [​IMG]


    Mark's track running for about 40 - 50 km turned out to be quite tricky in places due to mud and land errosion. But I managed fine and it had plenty of fun. Maguga dam lake behind:


    [​IMG]


    And onwards east.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    Some sections were properly washed out and required a bit of scouting to find a way around:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    And onwars I rode:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    I made an half-assed attempt to ride over this palm tree instead of doing the clever thing and ride around it and paid the price - those things are slipery:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    #3
  4. Xpat

    Xpat Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    799
    Location:
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    There were few more tricky sections before I hit the main dirt road heading east towards Namaacha, but nothing 500 wouldn't take in its stride


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    Eventually I have emerged from the bush and hit the main dirt road heading east towards Namaacha. Here crossing the Komati river (I think):


    [​IMG]
    #4
    kpinvt, River Rat, LC8TY and 10 others like this.
  5. Xpat

    Xpat Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    799
    Location:
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    I arrived at the Namaacha border at about 14:00. I prefer this normally very quiet border crossing to the hustle and bustle of Komatipoort - on my prior two visits it was always pretty smooth going, even though I didn't have visa arranged upfront and had to go through the whole visa issue procedure at the border.

    But this time it came to bite me in the ass properly. It was pretty quiet, except lots of trucks loaded variety of second hand cars. That straight away gave it a bit dodgy feel, as I would bet at least some of those vehicles were not obtained legaly - seemed to me like the totsies found a new route to smuggle stolen cars from SA.

    More relevant there were quite a few bored touts milling around who naturally immediately zoomed in on me. Now I have done by now dozens and dozens of African border crossings, so I'm pretty adept at keep them at bay, but these clearly worked in cohoots with the border officials and I was badly outnumbered. The immigration was no issue (this time I got visa at the consulate in Pretoria), but the piece of c&*t officer at customs pretended not to speak English and one of the lingering touts conveniently swooped in to help fill some new customs form. I kept being an asshole as much as possible short of punching the guy, but I was clearly coming short in this game. The racket was, that I had to declare the value of the items I had on me and if it was over R1000, I would have to pay some kind of deposit on the border (like 30 - 40%), supposedly refundable on the exit of Mozambique. However if I kept the value less than R1000, I didn't have to pay any deposit.

    Now the tout who adopted me explained this to me (whether correct or BS I had no way to check as the officer was just incommunicado) and proceeded to change the value I have put in (about R3000 which was BS of course, but at least remotely believable) to R400 under watchfull eye of the piece of shit custom officer. Where they had me by the balls of course (unless they were bluffing all along and there was no such a thing as custom deposit), was that there were other custom officers waiting outside by the barrier who would according to the tout check the content of my luggage and easily estabish that my crap is worth way more than R400 (the smartphone on its own would probably suffice as evidence for them). So I had to fork out coule of hundred rand to grease the snakes to avert their eyes. From pure business perspective I would merrily pay that if it saved me hassle with the deposit (yes I'm pragmatist, not a moralist), but of course the whole episode left me with the sour taste in the mount as the situation was just stacked too much against me, and I felt that there most probably wasn't any such a thing as import deposit.

    I have somehow managed not to punch anybody and not call anybody too outrageaus names (except probably the tout, but he merrily took it for the cut he took from the bribe), but shot out of the border at pretty foul mood. The weather wasn't helping either - there were heavy low clouds rolling about threatening proper tropical downpour every minute.

    I rolled into the Namaacha town and stopped at the cash machine to get Meticais. Namaacha is a stark contrast to anything on Swazi side. It is very desolate and decreipt, looking like the war finished only a month or two ago. I've been here twice before so I knew what to expect, but with the bad weather closing in, it just looked particularly shitty.

    This can be actually extended to the whole of Mozambique. It is sunny day country. Meaning, when the weather is good it looks like tropical paradise with green palm trees, red dirt roads, white sand, deep green grass, turquoise seas and colorful houses provide myriad of dazzling colors and contrasts. People smile and even the neglected buildings widespready everywhere have nice latino kind of charm with sun shining on them.

    But as soon as the sun hides behind the consistent cloud cover, the place gets much more omnious and unpleasant feel. All the colors disappear into dark mush of grey and brown, people seem distinctly gloomy and the abandoned carcasses of ghostly moldy buildings (that has previously been clearly nice big properties) many of them with bullet marks that dot the landscape everywhere make one inevitably wonder about who built them, lived there and what end did they meet.

    In short, Mozambique didn't welcome me with a nice vibe, so I just put my head down and focused on getting to my planned overnight spot on the beach of Macaneta as fast as possible. I have made the mistake of riding to Macaneta through Maputo twice before, so this time I came ready and plotted a route bypassing Mapute in wide north west angle through Moamba. I thought I plotted it on tar, but to my this time pleasant surprise it turned out to me mostly very remote double track runninig up to Moamba mostly on rocky/muddy tracks along the Swazi hills and later from Moamba on sandy tracks roads towards the coast.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    I got caught out by quick intense downpour, that turned tracks in one section into a bit of clay nightmare. Even on light agile 500 I was sliding all over the show and duckwalking the bike for km or two. I don't know how to ride mud - I guess speed is key to keep tyres cleaning themselves, but I didn't have cojones to try that one out.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    So the sand after Moamba was a welcome change. I followed my track for about 20 km until I came upon two guardhouses with slits to shoot out from and was met by two soldiers with AKs and stuff. They didn't speak English and kept saying something about quarter or some such - which I figured is either prison or military camp (I couldn't see any other buildings in the bush though). What was clear was that I was not allowed to pass so I backtracked few km to a little settlement where I turned onto another much less used track that was heading towards another track I have remembered from my map research. After getting lost in the bush few times I have eventually found the other sand road connecting Moamba nad EN1 past Maputo and about 10 - 15 km short of Marracuene and pushed on as it was getting late.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    On tar I filled up and headed for Marracuene where I turned off and crosse Inkomati river on the newly built toll bridge. I have finally arived to Macaneta already in dark and headed for one of its oldest establishments (that I have never visited before) - Tan-N'-Biki lodge. It turned out to be big establishment and to my surprise it was almost completely empty. I got a chalet and rushed to the restaurant as they were about to close due to lack of clients I assumed. That would have been a disaster after testing day as I eat only once a day in the evening and the idea of that proper meal in the evening kept me going all the way from that bloody border.


    [​IMG]


    Anyway, I managed to get my obligatory 4 - 5 courses evening meal, so at the end of the day all is well that ends well. O0
    #5
    kiwial, DCrider, Shaggie and 4 others like this.
  6. Xpat

    Xpat Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    799
    Location:
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    Day 3 - Macaneta to Bilene

    The original plan for the day was to make it past Xai Xai along the coast and find a lodge or bushcamp somewhere on the beach. However when I woke up the weather was still pretty shitty with heavy low clouds all over the place promising plenty of rain soon. Which is not necessarily a bad thing on this track as this section to Bilene is probably the heaviest sand I have seen anywhere and the rain will make it easier to ride. But being wet through and through as I eventually ended up being gets old eventually, so I ended up calling it a day in Bilene where I retreated in heavy rain to my favourite there Complexo Palmeiras.


    [​IMG]


    I waited a bit in the morning to see if the weather wouldn't clear up a bit, but if that didn't happen I just geared up and set-off. First half up to Machubo I managed to stay dry, but afterwards the heavens opened up and very quickly I was soaked through and through.

    Leaving Macaneta:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    Then I hit the first set of dunes. Last time on 690 I battle here quite a bit, but this time it was a breeze:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    At places the track was quite a bit overgrown, but nothing to worry about too much:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    #6
    River Rat, kiwial, Brick Top and 4 others like this.
  7. Xpat

    Xpat Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    799
    Location:
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    I pushed on throught deeper and deeper sand. Clearly the track past Machubo towards Bilene is used much less as most people turn inland in Machubo and head for Manhica on EN1 via private plantation. I have also noticed only once deep into the track that T4A tracks call this track 'Restricted'. I didn't see any signs or barriers saying the same thing so figured I can always plead ignorance and pushed on:


    [​IMG]


    Eventually GPS started squeeking at me right about here:


    [​IMG]


    I don't follow GPS most of the time - use it just to record tracks, but the squeeking was annoying so I stopped to check it out. It said something like - 'Warning - land mines'.


    [​IMG]


    Now I remembered reading few years back in one of those Enduro magazines an article from a group of guys including one of my mates who were doing this track and turned back because of the possible landmine hazard. I have forgotten about it completely - it maybe explains the 'restricted' designation of the track.

    Anyway, the track I was on was well trodden and I had a bashplate anyway, so hey - what could go wrong? So I just pushed on along the lagoons heading north to Bilene:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    Something went wrong here, but hey, at least it is different:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    I have made it to Bilene without any undue explosion. I stopped at garage for petrol and to my pleasant surprise found out that I can withdraw money from my card at the garage - they just swipe your card for whatever cash you need and then give you cash. No need for ATM, may come handy in one of the more remote places.

    After that I ducked into the Complexo Palmeiras on the main lagoon. It was only about noon, but the weather continued to suck big time, and there is only so long I can ride with wet shrunken balls through mine fields.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    The weather continued to suck, so I just lazed about for the rest of the day in my chalet and restaurant nearby:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    #7
  8. Xpat

    Xpat Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    799
    Location:
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    Day 4 - Bilene to Zona Braza


    Next morning I finally woke to the clear sky and Mozambique improved straight away 1000%. So did my mood. Actually from now on for the rest of the trip in Moz I didn't have any more rain. This posed its own challenges as it turned horribly hot, but I managed just fine most of the days before 6:00 am and arriving to the destination at noon, or at 2:00 pm latest, to spend rest of the day lazing about the lodge and beach. That, plus light weight and agility (and lack of windscreen) of 500 which allowed me ride at quite a clip even in deep sand sitting down and hence have plenty of airflow to cool down.

    Initialy the plan for the day was to ride up the coast as far as possible and try to find somewhere along the beach to sleep over. I didn't know any place which made me a bit nervous - I came ready to bushcamp, but in my heart I'm a gastro-tourist and prefer creature comforts at the end of hard ride. Plus as I said I eat only once a day and then I eat like sabre tooth tiger on crack (or rather ganja, as most of sabre tooth tigers on crack I have seen looked like vegan zombies), and I didn't fancy to try to satiate myself with varienty of bully beef and bean cans I carried for self-defence.

    So I was very glad to discover on the internet that in about the right distance there is a nice beach place called Zona Braza and that became my objective for the day. Here is the route I planned and did end up riding:


    [​IMG]


    To contradict myself right away, I started only at 7:00 am because the track runs initially through some rich man development and they had a sign up that no bikes and quads before 7. Who am I to argue with a rich man so I obliged.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    I got lost almos straight away. I got lost well, if that makes sense. Like so:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    I somehow found myself on top of the dunes overlooking the beaches below:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    Another screwed up picture that looks like I'm riding Yamaha - not sure how to fix it so it will have to do:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    Now, on the account of the bike laying around like a piece of discarded garbge - yes, the sidestand - or rather the bolt holding the sidestand - wiggled itself lose and broke off before I hit the dunes. While this was mildly annoying at the time (the scenery helped to sooth me), it came to bite me hard later on in the trip. So from now on, only pictures of bike leaning against something or laying down.
    #8
    River Rat, Sandspit, Critic and 6 others like this.
  9. Xpat

    Xpat Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    799
    Location:
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    From the first set of dunes I then moved on to the next one, where I managed to get all the way down to the beach where I joined two Toyotas with Saffers with local holiday houses:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    Approach down to the beach:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    Hilax nad the wounded Katoom:


    [​IMG]


    Another screwed up picture:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    #9
  10. Xpat

    Xpat Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    799
    Location:
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    After I bummed this beach long enough, I set-off again finding my way back inlands and towards the EN1. However hard I tried in my planning, staring for along time at satellite images in a vain effort to find some ferry landing, I couldn't find any viable crossing of the mightly Limpopo river, apart from the bridge on EN1 (if anybody knows about ferry or some such down there - I'm sure there must be something). Plus I needed to fill up so I had to make a stop in Xai Xai - one of my least favorite places in the whole of Moz.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    On the way to EN1 I crossed village called succintly Vladimir Lenine. I am repeating myself, but I'm sitll intrigued who outside of USSR had the great idea to name a place after one of the biggest mass murderes of 20th century. I don't think there is place called Adolf Hitlere - actually I'm pretty sure there may be one tucked away somewhere in Argentinian Andes.


    [​IMG]


    Shortly after the leader of international proletariat I hit the EN1 for about 20 km to Xai Xai, where I stopped for petrol.

    Quick stop over at the Engen garage:


    [​IMG]
    #10
    River Rat, Shaggie, Dan Diego and 4 others like this.
  11. sirtwisty

    sirtwisty Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 6, 2010
    Oddometer:
    105
    Location:
    Brighton, Ontario in Canuck Land
    Holy Crapoly
    Riding this stuff kinda makes the Baja look like an Interstate highway.
    Enjoying your RR & pic's, with respect, you sure are one stubborn SOB.
    Ride safe
    #11
  12. Xpat

    Xpat Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    799
    Location:
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    After the refuel I gunned it through the choka a block traffic using pushing myself through every little gap I could find. Xai Xai is basically one big choke on EN 1 and hence always traffic jammed with people driving which and every lane they can to gain a meter or two here and there in typical african fashion. It was also early afternoon and properly hot, with fumes everywhere, so any civilized pretenses went out of the window and I just rode as fast and recklessly as I could through the town.

    Once I turned off EN 1 towards Xai Xai beach few km down the road, the traffic and myself calmed down and I quickly got beach bum vibe back, especially once I hit the very pictoresque sandy track following right along the beach for next 10 - 15 km. Like so:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    Eventually the track came to a fine speciman of one of those old abandoned carcass of previously grand building (couldn't figure out if it was former factory or beach resort). At this point the track turned inland, away from the beach:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    #12
    River Rat, Shaggie, Dan Diego and 4 others like this.
  13. Xpat

    Xpat Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    799
    Location:
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    Thanks :thumb
    #13
  14. mbanzi

    mbanzi Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2014
    Oddometer:
    130
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    Love this quote about riding through a possible minefield: "Anyway, the track I was on was well trodden and I had a bashplate anyway, so hey - what could go wrong?". Reminds me of a high school mate who plotted his route through the Angolan minefields using Google maps to find the big circles that had been cleared of mines!
    #14
    Frostguiding and Dan Diego like this.
  15. Throttlemeister

    Throttlemeister Long timer Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,553
    Location:
    Okie near Muskogee
    Great stuff Expat! Thanks for sharing your ride, like the style of living it up at the lodges in the evenings.
    #15
  16. WHYNOWTHEN

    WHYNOWTHEN where are the pedals?

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2009
    Oddometer:
    920
    Location:
    closer to Baja
    That’s frickin awesome!!!
    Thanks for sharing!
    If I was a bit closer I would love to join you on your next ridiculous ride
    #16
  17. Diobsud

    Diobsud Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2012
    Oddometer:
    44
    Location:
    NW WA
    Wow! Talk about an adventure! Thanks for the TR!
    #17
    Dan Diego likes this.
  18. steved57

    steved57 Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2007
    Oddometer:
    965
    Location:
    East Texas
    Great report and pics so far so keep me coming
    #18
  19. Xpat

    Xpat Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    799
    Location:
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    The sandy road headed inland most probably all the way to EN 1. I followed it for few km and then turned north again on the little tracks I have plotted on sat images. And I have to say I have done a great job :snorting:

    Main road:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    And onwards north following the coast through the sticks:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    There are plenty of inland lagoons like this one dotting the Moz coast. I took a break here and chatted to couple of locals who came out of the bush to check what is all the ruckus about:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    And onwards towards Zona Braza and medium rare fillet steak, followed by king prawns for a bit of Omega 3. Admitedly, even without the food option ahead, the riding was just sublime, the garden of eden kind of stuff (as long as the sun shines...):


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    Eventually I T-boned sandy road heading straight for the dunes on the beach that would take me to the Zona Braza lodge:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    The lodge was just what doctor ordered to get me back on the Moz side after the border debacle. See for yourself - first me casa:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    The amenities and scenery. What more can a gastro-tourist wish for?


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    #19
  20. Xpat

    Xpat Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    799
    Location:
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    Day 5 - Zona Braza to Zavora

    I woke up before sunrise and went for a stroll on the beach just as the sun came up:


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    With that sorted, I packed up and headed out.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    #20
    River Rat, nzrian, Red J and 14 others like this.