Bean Can gremlins woke up and tore up things...

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by One Less Harley, Jun 10, 2018.

  1. One Less Harley

    One Less Harley OH.THAT'S GONNA HURT

    Joined:
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    6,708
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    Well it was bound to happen, the dormant gremlins woke up and tore up the HES in the bean can...it was gonna happen. I was headed back home from a nice little ride when the bike backfired once loudly...so I checked the ODO and wasn't anywhere near reserve. In the time it took me to look and switch it back fired again and rather quickly died. I was about 35 miles from home.

    outside.jpg


    I called and got my Dad to pick me up..I could have had him get the spare beancan, but figured he'd not know what it was. I new about where it was, but just to keep the phone conversation simple...(trust me), it was better to have him just pick me up.

    So I waited inside the US Post Office while it rained....oh well the pig was a little dusty anyway....

    rain.jpg





    Once home I loaded up the trailer and extra bean can, and head back to Rochester KY..



    Quickly pulled the front cover and switched beancans....less than 2 minutes and she was running.

    front cover off.jpg
    #1
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  2. One Less Harley

    One Less Harley OH.THAT'S GONNA HURT

    Joined:
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    So tools were assembled and a new HES was pulled out of extra parts I had...or an easier way would be to buy the HES plate from Euromotoelectrics or Motobins.

    tools.jpg
    Tool list- Small picks, 1/16 and 1/4" punches, snap ring pliers, needle nose pliers, regular size Phillips, small and medium flat head screwdriver, small hammer, light grease and light grade oil, soldering iron, shrink tubing, and maybe some misc other tools.

    And doesn't everyone have an extra HES sensor lying around??? Not sure where I sourced this one from, but you can try by doing a search with the name and number on the box.

    HES sensor.jpg


    Removal of the bean can is easy only two different size allen wrenches and a small screwdriver or pick to release the spring clip at the electrical connection. Disconnect Pos terminal if bike has stock charging system.

    beancan topcover on.jpg


    Remove the two Phillips screws on the cover and pop the lid off. Mine took a little work since it was previously sealed with silicone.

    beancan cover off.jpg

    Then remove the two flathead screws to remove this plate above. Once that is off there is a spring clip which is held in place by spring pressure. Put one screw back in the spring clip and use that as a leverage point with a screwdriver to pry out of the grove. Sorry no pict of that.
    #2
  3. One Less Harley

    One Less Harley OH.THAT'S GONNA HURT

    Joined:
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    All that was the easy part. Do make sure to keep things in order when pulling appart as there are various shims between parts. Flip beancan over to where it mounts into the engine. The splined "cam gear" has a spring which needs to be removed to get the the locating pin. Gently pry the spring out with a pick or small screwdriver. Then use a punch to drift out the pin. Notice the locating marks on the cam gear and shaft...make sure these are in line when reassembling.
    The pin can only be driven out when lined up with the indentions of the housing body. Pull off the cam gear and carefully remove the shims note their location. Put them down on the table in an order you can remember.


    camgear.jpg



    Remove the three flathead screws in the bean can body. Then remove the guts and also the black plastic part is slid out at the same time. Once the guts are out remove the "timing wheel"...it is held in place by a circlip, a snap ring and 1/16" drift pin. !st remove the circlip with a small screwdriver, then with snap ring pliers remove the snap ring.

    This is where it get a little tricky, look at the bottom side of the cam wheel, there is a small ring at it's base, this will keep the drive pin from being knocked out from the top.. I had started driving the pin out but was having problems. Closer inspection revealed the ring, but when drifting the pin out it had pushed the snap ring away from the cm gear to allow enough room to use a small screwdriver to wiggle the snap ring down enough to drive the drift pin completely out. Be careful as the drift pin is very small and can be lost easily.

    timming disc.jpg

    Once the cam wheel is off the HES plate can be wiggled off, but make sure to pay attention to the advance weights and keep them in their location. No big deal if they move though. Old HES with pig tail cut off already, would have been better to have cut those wires close to the failed HES....New HES on the left.


    hes1.jpg
    #3
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  4. One Less Harley

    One Less Harley OH.THAT'S GONNA HURT

    Joined:
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    There are two plates on the HES, and one of the rivets is blocked by the lower plate. The two plates are held in relative position by a pin on the top plate and a hole on the bottom. I bent the bottom plate by wedging a screwdriver between the two. The carefully clamped the lower plate in a vice and drifted it around until the mounting rivet were completely exposed on the back side. Then used a dremel with a cutoff wheel to grind down the flattened head. When ground down enough the rivets were punched out and HES removed. Take this time to clean the beancan inside and out and also the HES late and cam weight plate. I used 400 grit sand paper on the shaft and a wire wheel on other parts to remove rust, dirt and old grease.


    hes2.jpg


    Place NEW HES in position on the plate and place HES facing down, making sure rivet head are on a suitable hard surface like a vice, or something that allows you to make good contact when flattening the rivets down with a 1/4" punch. Use good solid "taps" to flatten out the rivets.Take your time.


    Wires were soldiered together paying close attention to length to approximate as close to original as possible. Shrink tubing was used to insulate. Route wires close to the center and clip all three at the little black clip...or under the white plastic cover. Note- be careful if you have the plastic cover, be gentle when removing, just slightly wiggling a small screwdriver to loosen it up.


    hes3.jpg

    hes4.jpg

    Assembly is the reverse, but use light great or oil for any metal to metal contact.
    Silicone was also used at the top cover, sliding black plastic "door" for HES harness. Now would also be the time to replace the black o-ring.

    Exploded view (LESS SHIMS)

    thumbnail_IMG_20180610_184358991_HDR.jpg


    #4
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  5. mrclubike

    mrclubike Been here awhile Supporter

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    Tip about the solder joint

    Make sure you do not create a sharp spike that can pierce thru the shrink tube and short things out
    #5
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  6. One Less Harley

    One Less Harley OH.THAT'S GONNA HURT

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    #6
  7. One Less Harley

    One Less Harley OH.THAT'S GONNA HURT

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    no need to strip the wires back very far, a 1/4 inch of bare wire is all that's needed, then take time to twist them together nice and tight, add a dab of flux from a small screwdriver. FLUX is not an option, it is needed to help the soldier flow into the wires for a good joint.
    #7
  8. Geezerrv

    Geezerrv Been here awhile

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    Appreciate you posting this. I got a spare bean can to have just in case. It's old too so I should do this repair to it. Electronics are wonderfully reliable and trouble free up until they quit. Sometimes they cool off and work a short while longer then there's little one can do without new parts. I've had points weld together and the pivot arm break loose from them that would run long enough to get home or to civilization. A lot folks here are old enough to remember when the local garage had a tow truck but there weren't fleets of them. After electronics came on the scene fixing it on the roadside wasn't really possible anymore.
    #8
  9. Disston

    Disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    The real advantage to points was that you could see what was wrong with them when you knew what to look for. So yes there was a learning curve but points were the only thing to learn for 50 years or more.

    Maybe it doesn't work for everybody anymore but I'm running points today.
    #9
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  10. georgesgiralt

    georgesgiralt Been here awhile

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    #10
    FR700, spokester and mrclubike like this.
  11. ozmoses

    ozmoses .

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    Great post- this is the kinda thing that sucked me into the Boxerworks forum eons ago.
    #11
  12. Lee 303

    Lee 303 razryadka

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    Thanks for the tour. How many miles/years were on the failed HES ? Wait let me guess the odometer broke on the previous owners watch.....
    #12
  13. One Less Harley

    One Less Harley OH.THAT'S GONNA HURT

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    153000 miles those HES sensors are so unreliable do you think I should switch to points so I can start fiddling with them..LOL
    #13
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  14. ccmickelson

    ccmickelson MonoMania Supporter

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    I've always wondered about the mysteries of the bean can. Thanks for taking the time to post such an informative thread.
    #14
  15. Warin

    Warin Retired

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    You don't do much hot weather riding. Or the HES was particularly long lived. :1drink
    #15
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  16. georgesgiralt

    georgesgiralt Been here awhile

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    Well in south of France, weather is not that cold, and the bike spend it's first 30 years with an RT fairing. Mine died at around 200 000 km... (and I am the first and sole owner of the bike).
    So I won't, for any money, put points into the bike anymore ...
    Do as you like.
    As per the beancan, I've repaired a few for fellows inmates. They last very very long if they don't fry in the first week of installation.
    #16
  17. One Less Harley

    One Less Harley OH.THAT'S GONNA HURT

    Joined:
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    As per the beancan, I've repaired a few for fellows inmates. They last very very long if they don't fry in the first week of installation.

    OH don't tell me that I'm going on a trip next week!!! If it dies I'm cussing you out..
    #17
  18. hardwaregrrl

    hardwaregrrl Can't shoot straight Supporter

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    It does get a tad warm in Kentucky. I think mine made it to about 120k riding around the desert of Las Vegas and then the humidity of atlanta. It’s really easy to just swap the plates. I’ve rebuilt 2 cans now with a new sensor and I highly recommend a clean workbench and disassembly in a plastic baggie. I lost my locating pin the first time around. Ugh....
    #18
  19. motorrad3DP

    motorrad3DP motorrad3DP@gmail.com

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    nice. super helpful. fwiw rick has the HES sensor. not sure if he also has the harness (http://www.euromotoelectrics.com/product-p/ign-plug088set.htm). always happy to have an excuse to get something from rick. partly cause he was the first guy to help me sort my airhead. but also because he used the term “hors de combat” about my valeo which i had to look up.
    #19
  20. Cdubs

    Cdubs made for adventure

    Joined:
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    great post, I moved to points on my G/S but still have a couple of HES beancan airheads so this is great info :). I thought I read these were "non serviceable"
    #20