Belly of the Beast... 3 MN amigos to ride KLR's through Central America

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Ringobus, Oct 9, 2019.

  1. Boyscout1108

    Boyscout1108 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Looks like you're having a great time. Envious!!! Best of luck.
    #81
  2. Plebeian

    Plebeian Scruffy-Looking Nerf Herder Supporter

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    Zero was missed. They like being on the road. Geez......
    #82
  3. Sjoerd Bakker

    Sjoerd Bakker Long timer

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    I am Enjoying the pictures too, would be nice if you could add the names of a few places to show your progression .
    As KLR owner I think your oil consumption rate is not a worry ( yet ) because you are really running them at high speeds for hours .Going slower would reduce the rate of loss .
    ( up to 1 liter per 1000 km is considered an acceptable amount for just about any bike being used like that )
    Do take the time (`~ one minute:-) ) to reset the KLR doohicky tensioner every 5000km . It will reward you with longer engine service .
    #83
  4. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    No doubt they do...Iron Butt Latino edition.

    I do you you missed the gist of my post however.
    #84
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  5. Ringobus

    Ringobus Been here awhile

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    4CD2F371-8545-40F7-97AB-39AEC7DCF036.jpeg I have had 2- 1000 V-Storms and I would not take either on this trip however I would take a 650. My brother owns one and I think he would agree. The 1000 is just too much street bike feel for my liking and if I brought a fuel injected it would be a BMW 800 or 1200 like it took to Alaska. Dependable, comfortable and sturdy. We decided on killers Since they have little value and we could walk away and fly home without a huge loss. So far they are working pretty well. Since they are old school technology anybody down here can work on them and we also didn’t wanna look like we were loaded up with cash.
    #85
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  6. z1rider

    z1rider n00b

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    "killers" ..... I like that, though I doubt that's the first time a KLR has been referenced that way, it's the first I've heard of it.

    A friend and I entered Mexico yesterday via Laredo. He's on a gen 2 killer and I'm on the gen 1 I took to Alaska 2 years ago. We're headed for Panama to catch the Stahlratt (sp?) for transit to Columbia and beyond. Maybe we'll bump into you guys on your way back up.
    #86
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  7. Ringobus

    Ringobus Been here awhile

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    Actually the day I bought my gen 1 KLR back in 2007 new from the dealer I drove it over to my buddies house to show him the bike and his smart ass kid took one look the the KLR and said that bike it killer and that is why we call them that. He put 2 and 2 together by taking out the vowels.
    I like the gen 2 better for sure so let’s talk about my add ons.
    I added the Tusk carrying cases and crash bars. The cases are exactly what you need and nothing you need. I bought 2 of the slide in clothes bags (optional) to carry up to the hotel room at night. They slip in effortlessly. The cases lock easily and nothing moves around. The other side I have balanced with tools, tire irons, spare tubes, a compressor and chain lube. I never go into that one unless needed so that is why I strap the spare tire on in that location.
    Lastly when I bought the bike last spring it had an Apache hard case mounted on the back. Awesome. $65 at Harbour Freight or on eBay.
    The crash bars were excellent for highway pegs but I just rest my feet up on top of them from time to time.
    I also put on a 16 tooth front sprocket dropping the RPMs down about 400 to 500. I have mixed feelings about this because I do not have the low-end torque through the gears but love the highway cruising speed’s. I guess to do it all over again I would leave the factory sprocket on.
    Since we left Mexico our speeds have dropped by a bunch and we find ourselves going 55 to 65 as the norm.
    We ordered mechanical cruise controls for all three bikes at about 35 bucks each and it was worth every penny. We don’t use them often but they are great for stretching out your arm or getting blood flow going back into your hand.
    I bought a Sargent seat which sits a little lower and is wider making it easier to sit for long pokes and since I am a hobbit I can easily flat foot the bike without having the lowering link.
    I did a new chain and sprocket before the trip along with a full service since I had the most miles on my bike when we started at about 8000.
    Our rear Shinkos have held up great with little wear. We are now 2200 since we crossed into Mexico.

    2 upgrades I should have done was a fork brace and upgraded the springs in the forks that are on the 2014’s or 2015’s and newer.
    The rest is stock and I like it that way.
    #87
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  8. Ringobus

    Ringobus Been here awhile

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    F7D26C5C-01A2-4C94-9544-C74312823A97.jpeg
    #88
  9. Ringobus

    Ringobus Been here awhile

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    By the way I am in putting all of this on the fly on my iPhone 7 small screen. It is not easy putting it together but dropping photos in is simple.
    I’m a little behind on the postings so we will start with our arrival crossing the Guatemala Honduras border which was under an hour total. We drove past huge banana fields and went to Chiquita is huge hubs.

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    #89
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  10. Ringobus

    Ringobus Been here awhile

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    2FD48206-8008-410E-98AC-46759531BACF.jpeg 164C923D-4F09-4800-BF8B-1115FA24FD0E.jpeg D46E25E2-2A04-4202-9FA1-5D32D13B98CE.jpeg D46E25E2-2A04-4202-9FA1-5D32D13B98CE.jpeg BAB7ED46-6379-45CF-B980-AD4B614092EC.jpeg F827E253-69ED-4AFC-8889-EFA778C878EB.jpeg 0F78943A-8171-470C-BF6F-3D8F16003C41.jpeg From the border we worked her way over to Omoa Honduras to the Hotel Parasio.
    Awesome place close to the boarder on the Atlantic Ocean. The weather was sub standard so only a few photo of the resort, pool, ocean and food.

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    #90
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  11. Cal

    Cal Long timer

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    1/1/2 days to cross Guatemala? That hotel in Omoa sure looks nice!
    #91
  12. Ringobus

    Ringobus Been here awhile

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    I am so terribly sorry I am getting this to you late as we have been a little busy.
    To this the story line correctly I need to go back to yesterday morning and continue the story.
    As I mentioned before we ended up in Omoa Honduras at the Hotel Paraiso for the night ending the day with a light rain shower and a belly full of food and a few beers.
    We ended up with a 3 bed room for all of us to hang and go over the plans for the next few days.

    We are a group of pure riders and enjoy interacting with the locals but find it a bit challenging.
    Most of the days end up being in the saddle and that is how we like it. Everyone likes things a bit different like hiking and exploring. WE are all about the ride and what we found that Guatemala didn't disappoint. We loves it there.

    Staring out the day was with a light shower rolling through so we suited up just in case of a down pour. That didn't happen. From Omoa we continued on to San Pedro Sula which is a very large city and can be a huge challenge to go through. What all of you know about traffic laws and courtesy doesn't exist anywhere down here. Remember being told to drive defensively when starting out as a new driver? This is full on defense, offence and hold on for dear life and occasionally check your pants because you might have just shit your pants and I am not talking about the suspect meal you ate the night before. Thankfully we are very skilled and there are so many bikes down here the locals are always looking. No start seeing motorcycle stickers in a window of a car. That is another topic to talk about. People down here drive very small cycles and only out of necessity. They carry bundles of wood, bottle of propane, 3 family members into town and the list goes on and on. You will never hear anyone down here say "hey Pedro, lets go for a motorcycle ride this weekend for fun".

    Once we finally got through that hell we got into some of the best riding I have ever had in all of my years of riding. The main roads down here are excellent and full of hair-pin turns and 45-60 mph. Epic. As we continued on over the mountain range the temps dropped down into the low 60's and was refreshing since it has been really hot down here.
    Norm's bike starting acting up with fuel - carburetor problems. The bike was cutting out at 50 - 60 in what we believed was lack of fuel supply. We pressed on through Tegucigalpa
    (the capital city of Honduras) and headed to the border crossing into Nicaragua. It was seamless punching out of Honduras and Nicaragua's boarder patrol and process is bizarre.
    They bonced us around to a ton of different officials, photo copies, money exchanges and finally on our way. This was the longest crossing yet at 2 hours even. We are managing to average 1:15 at each which is different from what everyone has been saying but we are not on the Pan-American Highway yet. IMG_1860.JPG
    #92
  13. Ringobus

    Ringobus Been here awhile

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  14. Ringobus

    Ringobus Been here awhile

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    #94
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  15. Ringobus

    Ringobus Been here awhile

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    We woke to an incredible morning in Esteli and grabbed a little breakfast and out the door. Norm got up early to wrench on his cycle. Still issues throughout the day and unable to exceed 65 MPH.
    The border crossing out of Nicaragua was again a joke but entry into Costa Rica a breeze. 2:15 total. Welcome to the Pan American highway.
    The drive down to Puntarenas was easy until we got to road contraction. The line of cars and trucks were lined up for miles at a stand still.
    We noticed a police escort with about 15 BMW cycles on tour flew by and we started the bikes and jumped in line. We had to have saved over an hour taking advantage of the escort.

    We rolled into our rooms at a beautiful resort here. 2 more days to Panama City but hoping to get the border crossing out of the way today.
    #95
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  16. panchogarrancho

    panchogarrancho Been here awhile

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    The Triumph dealer in Managua keeps basic parts for KLR’s and DR’s
    Don’t miss Laguna de Apoyo on you way south
    #96
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  17. Ringobus

    Ringobus Been here awhile

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    #97
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  18. Ringobus

    Ringobus Been here awhile

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    We woke to another sunny day today. The weather so far on this trip has been extraordinarily awesome. We are fortunate for sure.
    A few observations about Central America...
    Dogs are everywhere on the roads and laying in the streets sleeping.
    Random people are popping up everywhere.
    In the middle of nowhere just walking along the road.
    Everywhere we go there there are people on cell phones and most are waiting at the bus stop with their nose buried in their phones. It’s sad just like the US.
    Traffic, fend for yourself in the cities.
    They communicating with their horns and they also whistle a certain way to get their point across.
    There a random animals tied to trees along the side of the roads like cows, goats and horses to cut down the ditch grass.
    Popcorn showers happen out of nowhere.
    The thought that these countries are all poor down here is a myth. We see nobody going hungry, they are well-dressed and people are up to speed with technology. Satrapies dishes on all of the homes.
    In the rural parts the houses look like squalor but in the cities society is pretty sophisticated.
    Toyota is the greatest engineered vehicle of all time. There are more Toyota vehicles dating back to the early 70s still rolling down here unlike any other brand and normally carrying twice the load they are rated for like 2 full sized cows in the back.
    There has been a tremendous police presence down here but they all appear to have nothing to do. Crime appears to be very low. We have gone through over 30 police checkpoints and not one time have we been stopped.
    The entire Hispanic culture honors their passed away loved ones unlike any other culture I’ve seen. Every weekend they go to the cemeteries and adorn the grave sites with the flowers and keep the sites all cleaned up. Wow!
    They build small houses or above ground crypts that are ornate and beautiful for the dead.
    The countryside is very beautiful and the roads are absolutely perfect unless you go off of the beaten path which we have done a bunch.
    I had people ask me before we left won’t you be afraid? There is absolutely nothing to be afraid of down here and if you’ve ever thought about seeing any of these countries don’t delay. It is absolutely worth the trip.
    Lastly the cost to travel here is approx half or less than anything in the US.
    More to come!
    #98
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  19. ApexJeff

    ApexJeff Been here awhile

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    [QUOTE="Ringobus, post: 38763042, l We have gone through over 30 police checkpoints and not one time have we been stopped.

    I had people ask me before we left won’t you be afraid? There is absolutely nothing to be afraid of down here and if you’ve ever thought about seeing any of these countries don’t delay. It is absolutely worth the trip.
    Lastly the cost to travel here is approx half or less than anything in the US.
    More to come![/QUOTE]


    I rode my 2000 KLR 650 from Tucson to the tip of SA and return. I left with around 3k miles on it. I returned after 8 years of fly and ride with over 50K and 2 speedometers, its now retired in Kino, for some well desired rest and sand for soft landings. BTW I bought it in MN.
    Great ride!!! Set your own pace, enjoy!!!
    If you can take a ride down to OSA, its the best of CR. Rio Sereno the border crossing into Panama rather than Paso Canoas is recommended.

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    #99
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  20. Dan Diego

    Dan Diego Long timer

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