BergDonk's DR650s

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by BergDonk, Dec 20, 2010.

  1. colyrider

    colyrider Adventurer

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    Politician Land
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  2. Dalmatino

    Dalmatino Been here awhile

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    Thanks for that information...Appreciated!
    I'm sure BergDonk doesn't mind, but all the same, we'll try and not sidetrack things much further lol.
  3. sh4kes

    sh4kes Been here awhile

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    I was similar. Maybe closer to 40kg on the back of mine all around aus an no problems (and I stuck as much to dirt tracks as possible, so it wasnt smooth rolling). Maybe just luck? :dunno
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  4. Precis

    Precis Maladroit malcontent

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    Aye - and BD is about my size but perhaps a tad ... stouter ... though i do know he rides with ... vigour.
    Our bikes were bought new - perhaps his were pres-stressed?
    Or we were lucky, as you suggest?
    I think we can rule out Suzuki making any running improvement during production?
  5. BergDonk

    BergDonk Old Enough to Know Better

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    Snowy Mountains Oz
    Have a proper go :lol3 you're all a bunch of wimps........ :D

    In the meantime did another 550 kms over the last couple of days. Damn hot, up to 35C yesterday afternoon, and engine temps are hotter than I'd like. Runs fine, but I can't keep my eye off the gauge on hills. Pulled up to let it cool down once 120C is reached a couple of times, although might have gone over that a tad at times too.

    Engine runs great, no sign of overheating as far as operation is concerned. Fuel consumption came in right on 19.8 km/l (46.5 US mpg), about 10% worse than I would have expected with its most recent 650 FCR40 configuration. However, another DR650 along for the trip, with Staintune and Staintune recommended jetting, which OTTOMH I don't recall, used about 10% more fuel again.

    790 with my setup then has a bit more off the bottom building to a lot more from 4k rpm onwards, revving a lot harder than stock from the mid range on, but perfectly linear and smooth at whatever throttle setting, so very easy to ride, just like a DR, only more. Gearbox remains great, quiet, no missed shifts, just works like a gearbox should.
    JagLite, toecutta and Nogoodnamesleft like this.
  6. BergDonk

    BergDonk Old Enough to Know Better

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    I decided to get some new stickers for DR1 to sort of match the missus' build, HE650RS. No longer an FE650, but an HI790S.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    think about it.......:drink
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  7. wiz.au

    wiz.au Long timer

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    Mi790ne... ??
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  8. Lerxstdawg

    Lerxstdawg Wait...what?

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    That's pretty clever


  9. SoPaRider

    SoPaRider Been here awhile

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    Bump!
  10. BergDonk

    BergDonk Old Enough to Know Better

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    Nothing much happening ATM, my test schedule was interupted by a kangaroo 3 weeks ago about 30 kms from home. Bike seems OK, some minor cosmetic damage is all I think, but I have 5 broken ribs and a now healed punctured lung. Every body function/movement etc is associated with the rib cage....... and 'someone' need to develop an innoculation for sneezing......

    Oil is in the works though, and I should have some info for those joining in on the test program real soonish.
    toecutta and JagLite like this.
  11. SoPaRider

    SoPaRider Been here awhile

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    All the best with your recovery.
  12. DIRT SQUIRTER

    DIRT SQUIRTER Bitumen is just a way of getting there!

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    No good mate, thought you were a bit too quiet... I did same going through a fence once, which I could share the tale, but I know you wouldn't appreciate humour ATM..
    Rest up.
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  13. Hazard14

    Hazard14 Adventurer

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    Sorry to hear the rib and lung damage Berg. Hope the Roo was not too badly hurt. The sneezing is Hell! I hit a flock of sheep August last year and it still hurts when I sneeze. Ribs and heavily bruised liver. Three sheep killed.
    Keep up the pain meds and look out for signs of Pneumonia. I was back on the DR inside three weeks but it was very sore for three months.
    Get well soon.
    Cheers, Bruce
  14. BergDonk

    BergDonk Old Enough to Know Better

    Joined:
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    Healing is happening, but too slowly as ever, and thanks for all the kind thoughts. I can sort of type a bit better now, so:

    I'd had a day out to Braidwood on Sun 14/01 with @DougW, @wiz.au and @colyrider, who incidentally, after a brief run on my 790, reckoned it reminded him of a KTM500. It was an excellent day out, and I was starting to get my bike fitness back a bit after Christmas and the 6 weeks prior rehab/layoff from my foot surgery. Doug and I decided that the following Tue and Wed would be good for an explore of some Errinundra tracks that have been on my to do list. Doug decided to drive down with bike in tow to home here Mon pm so we could get an early start Tue, and if we were late back Wed, he'd be able to get the further 1.5 hrs home in the comfort of his Prado.

    We eventually left home about 11:15 after a few delays! I live in the bush, aka rural Australia, where wildlife is a constant hazard on the road. Its worst at twilight, not good at night and can strike any time of day anyway. About 30 mins and 40 kms after leaving home we're on the gravel Tuross Rd, that gets even narrower at that point, to about 1.5 cars width, with trees and scrub to the edge of the gutter. I slowed down to what I estimate was about 50 kph. My speed selection is a function of my vision, and my estimate as to whether I can deal with what appears within it. Doug commented later that he wondered why he was suddenly in my dust cloud.

    I was perhaps 1.5 m from the gutter, about the middle of the left lane such as it is. We mostly travel on the correct side of the road in Oz, the left. There were some large trees a metre or two from the gutter/bank, along with some scrub. Suddenly a grey/black apparition launches towards my front wheel from behind a tree. Kangaroos when startled just launch without any logic or thought, they're not very bright, Skippy excepted.

    I recall mumbling 'Oh Shit' or similar and getting to, or at least trying for, the front brake, but probably didn't apply anything. Impact thud and the front wheel feels high somehow and is locked up. Seems the roo, estimated later at 1.2-1.4 m, has gone under my front wheel and is jambed between it and the bash plate.

    So at about 50 kph with the front locked and elevated, its now sliding down the camber towards the gutter. I recall pulling the clutch and locking the rear so that it followed into the gutter instead of getting sideways, muscle memory stuff I suppose, trying to keep the wheels in line and that maybe I can save it as I'm not down yet. Then the front wheel hits the off side of the gutter and climbs out up onto the bank, which meant the bash plate cleared the roo carcass and the rear wheel launched off it up the bank too.

    So now I have some large trees and a fence to dodge, while the bike is swapping from side to side. I sort of save it, I think, and the front wheel is pointing back towards the road in the desired direction. I recall thinking that I have saved now it and then I'm high in the air and on the ground, separated from the DR and in a lot of pain, gasping for breathes, hoping I'm just badly winded. Seems there was a half buried stump or log that finished me off in sight of my big save. I guess at the end I was doing 20-40 kph, dunno.

    I'm lying on my left side, looking in the direction I'd come from, and the bike is a couple of metres away, on its side, idling away, back wheel spinning. Doug pulled up and came to check on me. I travel with a mobile phone, which is useless in this place, a satellite phone and a PLB. Doug carries a Spot. My satellite phone was in my backpack and the PLB on my right front shoulder strap, which I could access.

    My breathing settled a bit, and we agreed that Doug should go to a nearby house and call home where my daughter was working from, having come home for a few weeks. She could bring Doug's Prado and trailer out and rescue me. My satellite phone is prepaid and to make anything other than an emergency '000' call a voucher needs to be validated first.

    Lying there, I hear a vehicle approaching from behind, from the direction we were originally heading. It slows and I wonder who will hop out and offer assistance, then it speeds up and disappears, hmmmmm. Did they see me? I’m not far from the edge of the road, but hidden perhaps, and perhaps the roo carcass got their attention, dunno.

    Then I hear another vehicle coming, from the direction we’d come from, which did slow and stop. A young bloke and his girlfriend hop out and undertake a primary survey. Seems he’s a ski patroller and up on first aid and she’s the daughter of a local GP who I’ve known for 30 odd years and is herself halfway through medicine at uni.

    Doug’s yet to return, but I’ve now realised that sitting up in a car isn’t going to happen and that I’ve suffered more than just a good winding. I ask Charlie, my good Samaritan, to extricate the satellite phone from my backpack and call 000. He manages to find it without inflicting too much more pain and I give him instructions on its operation when Doug returns, having successfully contacted home, so Prado is now enroute.

    Apparently, and not uncommon unfortunately, our location was a challenge for the 000 call centre to interpret. We’re on a public road, called Tuross Road, and adjacent to a street address! Eventually a coord position was accepted, and I suppose after the best part of an hour later, an ambulance and Police Pajero arrive.

    The paramedics try for some time unsuccessfully to get a cannula into me. I have challenging veins that are visible, but thick walled and springy. They weren’t happy, their professional pride was compromised, as it was again later on in both Cooma and Canberra Hospitals.

    Throughout I’m in a lot of pain. The paramedics gave up on the cannula and gave me a ‘whistle’ and then with the assistance of all present, removed some clothing. They talked about cutting my Klim Badlands jacket off, but I said no and I’d cope, which I did, somehow.

    The good samaritans, police and paramedics all remarked on the quality of my gear, Klim Badlands jacket, Arai XD4 hat, leather gloves, Klim Dakar pants, POD knee braces and Forma Predator boots, and that we had emergency comms well covered. And with the roo carcass in the gutter, no one was disputing my version of events and I had some sympathy.

    At some point in this my daughter arrived and she and Doug loaded up my bike which they reckoned looked hardly damaged, maybe only a mirror and a fairing crack, but TBC still.

    Bouncing and shaking for 50 mins or so to Cooma Hospital was difficult. After some hours there, with cannulas finally inserted and a chest drain for the pneumothorax I was transferred to Canberra Hospital where I spent the next 5 days. Doug put the word out and I had a few visitors. A few pooled together to buy me a get well stuffed toy kangaroo and a pot plant of kangaroo paw, which made my day, although I could have done without the laugh.

    5 broken ribs and a punctured lung hurts, a lot. EVERY body function/movement is connected in some way to your rib cage.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Lessons? Not sure, maybe damn the cost and keep the satellite phone validated, always ATGATT, ride at a 'safe' speed, whatever that is, never ride alone perhaps, but definitely that multiple busted ribs hurts like nothing else I've suffered over the years. I've ridden 20-30,000 kms a year since I retired 9 years or so ago and had a few close calls, so perhaps it was inevitable?

    As a sideline issue, my wife hit a kangaroo in the car coming home from work just before I went on my big trip last Oct. A bit of duct tape sorted it in the interim. Then while I'm foot rehabbing she scored another at the beginning of Dec. I decided to do an insurance claim which eventually resulted in a writeoff a couple of weeks ago and we collected a new car last week.

    If bad things happen in 3s, with 3 roo strikes in recent times, are we done?

    [​IMG]



    EDIT
    [​IMG]

    I finally downloaded the GPS. My estimate of about 50 kph at impact is pretty close I reckon. Not sure where it actually happened on the log, but speed went from 57 to 42 kph near the end and it would have happened in that leg I suspect. I think that I came off when speed was about 10-15 kph, almost at the end, but I did come down from a height.
  15. DeepBarney

    DeepBarney International Bumbler

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    Glad you made it out semi alright. Heal well.


    Damn 'roos really are a nuisance. At least it wasn't a wombat.
    BergDonk likes this.
  16. DR Steve

    DR Steve Been here awhile

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    Jan 21, 2012
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    Sorry to hear Steve. Quite the ordeal that's going to take a while to get over no doubt.

    Unfortunately I don't think there's anything for you to learn, but perhaps a few things for some of us in terms of preparedness.
    You were well prepared in terms of comms and protective gear and from your description traveling at an appropriate speed, it's simply a case of bad luck and part of the risk we all take as motorcyclists. Not riding is the only way to avoid these risks.
    The solo riding risk is something I think about often as it's something I do often with early starts and plenty of active wildlife.

    Hoping you heal quickly and without complications.
    BergDonk likes this.
  17. Fishnbiker

    Fishnbiker Tire smuddy, hook swet

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    My sympathies on your injuries, I too have learned the hard way, too many times.

    Maybe a lesson about speeding in the dark? On my road trip to the flinders last August, we had dinner in Hawker & had to get 40+km to Edie Owee in the dark. We ended up doing about 40kmh on the centreline due to all the roos. Next morning we had issues with wedge tail eagles flying out between the roadside bushes while feeding on the dead Roos. Counted 0ver 200 dead roos up to Leigh Valley.

    My last ride to Mexico we tried at all costs to be off the road before dark, reasons being ...

    #1 Oil from blown engines ...

    [​IMG]

    #2 Mexican transport ...

    [​IMG]

    #3 Donkeys on the road ...

    [​IMG]

    #4 Cattle on the road ...

    [​IMG]

    #4 Horses on the road, much bigger than Roos ...

    [​IMG]

    #5 Spikey cactus things if you do leave the road ...

    [​IMG]

    I learned to slow down.
  18. BergDonk

    BergDonk Old Enough to Know Better

    Joined:
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    Snowy Mountains Oz
    A few more random thoughts:
    • Broken ribs are a PITA
    • My wife still loves me, accepts that this can happen from time to time, and if I don't ride, I'm not me. She actually had an off herself some years ago, came to a stop, missed her footing and went down with 2 broken ribs and a punctured lung the result
    • Without good gear, I could have been worse off, maybe much worse
    • I acquired a new helmet for Christmas, but wasn't wearing it this time as the Arai still had some life in it, no more though
    • If things are to go wrong, its better that they happen closer to home, it simplifies the logistics
    • Broken ribs are a PITA, or did I mention that already?
    Noprogram, Precis, Te Hopo and 4 others like this.
  19. TRTN

    TRTN Adventurer

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    Sorry to hear about the roo-induced injuries - i suppose hitting one is inevitable when you ride many km's on australian roads. I'll make sure to eat an extra roo steak this week to keep the numbers down.

    On a group ride a few years back one of us had a low speed stack up a hill, hitting the blunt edge of a deep rut right under his armpit. Multiple broken ribs and a flail segment were the result - incredibly painful and slow to recover. Hope you get off the pain medication soon, the withdrawal is going to hurt but opiate dependency is a real risk with these injuries.

    ATGATT and be prepared for these things to happen is the real take away here i think. There's only so much defensive riding you can do with wildlife.

    And as a side note, the only gear i've seen that might prevent or reduce rib cage injuries like this is the tekvest rally max - full wrap around under the arms. Most pressure suits only do spine and chest plate. It's a lot of gear to be wearing all the time though - the usual trade offs apply.
    BergDonk likes this.
  20. sh4kes

    sh4kes Been here awhile

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    Oct 17, 2012
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    The Leatt body suit also has a good wrap around. I have a body armour suit and find the chest / rib area woefully lacking.